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Access to Care
Access to Care
Differences in access to health care can have far-reaching consequences. Those with limited access to basic health care may live shorter and more constrained lives.
Environment
Environment
The surroundings in which people live affect their health. Air and water quality, safety and green space all contribute to a community’s health status.
Quality of Care
Quality of Care
Quality health care requires that providers routinely asses the effectiveness of medical tests, treatments and measures to improve the delivery of services.
Exercsise
Exercise
Regular exercise, especially aerobic exercise (exercise that lasts long enough and is done regularly to keep your heart and lungs in good condition), has many benefits, including increasing one’s length and quality of life.
Family & Social Support
Family & Social Support
Positive social support (family, friends, peers) plays an important role in one’s ability to make healthier choices.
Food Access
Food Access
Availability of healthy foods like fruits and vegetables increase the likelihood of having a nutritious diet. In areas known as 'food deserts,' healthy food options are limited or non-existent.
Income
Income
Having a low income is a major contributor to higher incidence and severity of illness and earlier death.
Public Policy
Public Policy
Policies and legislation that support individual and community health efforts can have a positive influence on the health of a population.
Education
Education
People with higher levels of education-of any race or ethnicity-are more likely to report better health. For instance, high school graduates are nearly twice as likely as college graduates to have sub-optimal health.
Stable Housing
Stable Housing
Affordable and safe housing is critical to the well-being and health of families.
Treatment Adherence
Treatment Adherence
A key component of improved health is the patient's adherence to a prescribed treatment regimen.

Welcome

The Hopkins Center to Eliminate Cardiovascular Health Disparities is established as a partnership of the Johns Hopkins Schools of Medicine, Nursing and Public Health. Diseases of the heart and blood vessels (cardiovascular disease or CVD) include high blood pressure, coronary artery disease and diabetes. CVD is a leading cause of death for people living in Baltimore. CVD is also a major reason that a twenty-year difference in lifespan exists among the city’s residents.

The scope of the Center is broad, targeting many different parts of our community. We are striving to improve the health of the diverse population that calls Baltimore home. The first goal of the Center is to improve cardiovascular health for residents of the Baltimore Metropolitan Area. Our second goal is to reduce the disparities in cardiovascular disease among racial/ethnic groups in Baltimore.

We hope you find this website user-friendly. You will find specific pages created for the community’s use. You will also find pages that are to be used by clinicians and students as resources. I hope you find this website a useful tool to improve the health and well-being of you and your family. Please visit us on the site often, and send us your suggestions for making the site better.

Sincerely,

Lisa A. Cooper, MD

Lisa A. Cooper, MD, MPH, FACP
Professor of Medicine & Principal Investigator
The Hopkins Center to Eliminate Cardiovascular Health Disparities

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Highlights

  • The Hopkins Center to Eliminate Cardiovascular Health Disparities is one of ten National Institutes of Health-funded Centers for Population Health and Health Disparities.
  • The Center includes 23 faculty from the Schools of Medicine, Nursing, and Public Health, who are working in collaboration with Johns Hopkins Community Physicians and focusing initially on improving control of hypertension in African Americans, who are disproportionately affected.
  • A thirty-member advisory board composed of community members (representing patients, faith- and community-based organizations, neighborhood associations, historically black colleges, practicing clinicians, and local public health agencies) helps guide the Center to achieve its research, training and dissemination objectives.

 

 Cooper in Atrium

 

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