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Center for Gun Policy and Research

Reducing Gun Violence in America
To order a copy of “Reducing Gun Violence in America” from JHU Press, please click here. To read the 2014 Update, please click here. More
Gun Policy Summit January 14-15, 2013
Johns Hopkins University convened more than 20 global experts on gun policy and violence to summarize relevant research and its implications for policymakers and concerned citizens. Click here for archived video of the event
The Case for Gun Policy Reforms
A synthesis of prior research and analysis conducted by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Center for Gun Policy and Research examines policy reforms and initiatives for reducing gun violence in the U.S. Download the Report
Legal Issues
The Center monitors and evaluates the effectiveness of major gun laws, including those related to: "Saturday night special" handguns; handgun registration and licensing; child access prevention; and minimum purchase and possession age. More
Gun Trafficking
The Center is committed to studying and reducing illegal firearm trafficking. The Center's work in this area focuses on the role of gun dealers, straw purchases, and firearm theft in the transfer of guns from legal to illegal markets. More
Keeping Guns from Youth
The Center studies policies and behaviors related to gun access and carrying among youth. Center research focuses on trends and prevention of youth homicide, suicide, violence, and unintentional injury by firearms. More
Domestic Violence
The Center studies policies and behaviors related to gun violence perpetrated by domestic violence offenders. Center research seeks to identify whether current legal practices effectively keep guns out of the hands of batterers. More

Keeping Guns from Youth

Young people in the United States are at risk for being both victims and perpetrators of firearm-related violence. In 2007, there were more than 4,900 firearm-related homicide victims age 24 and younger. In this same age group, almost 2,000 adolescents and young adults committed suicide with a firearm. The Center seeks to understand the risk factors for youth violence, and to translate that information into effective programs and policies. Center faculty and staff are equally committed to evaluating the effects of these interventions to determine which work to reduce violence and which do not. We provide information to legislators, police, public health professionals and others to help implement sound, science-based solutions.

Center Research

FIREARM INJURIES (book chapter)
In: Injury Prevention for Children and Adolescents: Integration of Research, Practice and Advocacy
Frattaroli S, Vittes KA, Johnson SB, Teret SP. 
American Public Health Association, 2nd edition, in press.

RISK-TAKING BEHAVIOR AMONG ADOLESCENTS WHO SAY THEY CAN GET A HANDGUN:
COMPARISON WITH THOSE WHO SAY THEY CANNOT GET A HANDGUN
Vittes KA, Sorenson SB. 
Journal of Adolescent Health 2006; 39(6):929-932.

USING LOCAL PUBLIC HEALTH POWERS AS A TOOL FOR GUN VIOLENCE PREVENTION:
THE BALTIMORE YOUTH AMMUNITION INITIATIVE
Lewin NL, Vernick JS, Beilenson PL, Lindamood M, Mair JS, Teret SP, Webster DW.
Am J Public Health 2005;95:762-765.

HOW DELINQUENT YOUTH ACQUIRE GUNS: INITIAL VERSUS MOST RECENT GUN ACQUISITIONS
Webster DW, Freed LH, Frattaroli S, Wilson MH
Journal of Urban Health 2002;79:60-69

 

For more research on firearms and youth, click here to browse the database of scholarly works by Center faculty.

Highlighted Research

J Womens Health (Larchmt). 2010 Jan;19(1):93-8.
Shootings are the most common method by which women are killed by an intimate partner in the United States. More
Am J Public Health. 2010 Oct;100(10):1856-60.
A widely publicized study of the relationship between gun shows and gun violence is being cited in debates about the regulation of gun shows and gun commerce. We believe the study is fatally flawed. More
J Urban Health. 2010 May;87(3):352-64.
Our findings should help law enforcement's illegal gun units to consider which of the thousands of crime gun traces to follow up with an investigation of possible trafficking. More
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