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Stroke Risk and Death Rates Fall Over Past Two Decades
Fewer Americans are having strokes and those who do have a lower risk of dying from them, finds a new study led by Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health researchers. Learn More
Underage Drinkers Exposed to Magazine Ads of Alcohol They Consumer
A new study from the Center on Alcohol Marketing and Youth found that underage drinkers were heavily exposed to magazine ads for they alcohol brands they drink. Learn More
More Midwives in World's Poorest Countries Could Save Millions of Lives
Increasing the number of midwives in the poorest countries could save millions of women's and babies' lives, researchers from Jhpiego, a Hopkins-affiliated nonprofit, found. Learn More
Broccoli Sprout Beverage Enhances Detoxification
In a 12-week clinical trial in China, researchers found that consuming a half cup of a broccoli sprout beverage once a day enhanced detoxification of air pollutants. Learn More
Baltimore Hookah Bars Contain High Levels of Carbon Monoxide
A study of seven Baltimore water piper or hookah bars found higher levels of carbon monoxide and air nicotine than in establishments that allowed smoking. Learn More

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  1. Measuring Calcium Buildup Is a Better Way to Predict Heart Disease in Those With Chronic Kidney Disease, Study Finds

    Calcium buildup in the coronary arteries of chronic kidney disease patients may be a strong indicator of heart disease risk, according to a new study led by Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health researchers.
    Fri, 22 Aug 2014 16:31:39 GMThttp://www.jhsph.edu/news/news-releases/2014/measuring-calcium-buildup-is-a-better-way to-predict-heart-disease-in-those-with-chronic-kidney-disease-study-finds.html
  2. CDC Awards $4 Million to the Johns Hopkins Center for Injury Research and Policy

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has awarded $4 million to the Johns Hopkins Center for Injury Research and Policy at the Bloomberg School of Public Health
    Mon, 18 Aug 2014 15:48:27 GMThttp://www.jhsph.edu/news/news-releases/2014/cdc-awards-four-million-dollars-to-the-johns-hopkins-center-for-injury-research-and-policy.html
  3. Harnessing the Power of Bacteria’s Sophisticated Immune System

    Researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health say they now have a clear picture of the bacterial immune system and say its unique shape is likely why bacteria can so quickly recognize and destroy their assailants.
    Thu, 14 Aug 2014 18:13:04 GMThttp://www.jhsph.edu/news/news-releases/2014/harnessing-the-power-of-bacterias-sophisticated-immune-system.html
  4. Researchers Uncover Clues About How the Most Important TB Drug Attacks Its Target

    Researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health say they have discovered a new clue to understanding how the most important medication for tuberculosis (TB) works to attack dormant TB bacteria in order to shorten treatment.
    Wed, 13 Aug 2014 13:32:54 GMThttp://www.jhsph.edu/news/news-releases/2014/researchers-uncover-clues-about-how-the-most-important-tb-drug-attacks-its-target.html
  5. Maryland Colleges Release Results from New Alcohol Survey

    A statewide collaborative led by 10 Maryland college and university presidents released the results today of the first annual Maryland College Alcohol Survey (MD-CAS), providing a comprehensive look at excessive drinking among Maryland college students.
    Tue, 12 Aug 2014 13:19:18 GMThttp://www.jhsph.edu/news/news-releases/2014/maryland-colleges-release-results-from-new-alcohol-survey.html
  6. A Vaccine Alternative Protects Mice Against Malaria

    A study led by Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health researchers found that injecting a vaccine-like compound into mice was effective in protecting them from malaria.
    Mon, 11 Aug 2014 19:17:28 GMThttp://www.jhsph.edu/news/news-releases/2014/a-vaccine-alternative-protects-mice-against-malaria.html
  7. Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health Launches Tobacco-Free Campus Initiative

    The Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health is now a tobacco-free campus. In launching the Tobacco-Free Campus Initiative, the School prohibits the use of any tobacco product – not just cigarettes – in all buildings, facilities and vehicles.
    Thu, 07 Aug 2014 17:03:30 GMThttp://www.jhsph.edu/news/news-releases/2014/johns-hopkins-bloomberg-school-of-public-health-launches-tobacco-free-campus-initiative.html
  8. Maryland State Health Secretary to Join Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

    Joshua M. Sharfstein, Secretary of the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, will join the faculty of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health as Associate Dean for Public Health Practice and Training effective Jan. 1, 2015.
    Wed, 30 Jul 2014 14:29:01 GMThttp://www.jhsph.edu/news/news-releases/2014/maryland-state-health-secretary-to-join-johns-hopkins-bloomberg-school-of-public-health.html
  9. Brand Specific Television Alcohol Ads A Significant Predictor Of Brand Consumption Among Underage Youth

    Underage drinkers are three times more likely to drink alcohol brands that advertise on television programs they watch compared to other alcohol brands, providing new evidence of a strong association between alcohol advertising and youth drinking.
    Tue, 29 Jul 2014 17:02:03 GMThttp://www.jhsph.edu/news/news-releases/2014/brand-specific-television-alcohol-ads-a-significant-predictor-of-brand-consumption-among-underage-youth.html
  10. Life Expectancy Gains Threatened As More Older Americans Suffer From Multiple Medical Conditions

    With nearly four in five older Americans living with multiple medical conditions, a new study by Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health researchers finds that the more ailments you have after retirement age, the shorter your life expectancy.
    Wed, 23 Jul 2014 13:48:18 GMThttp://www.jhsph.edu/news/news-releases/2014/life-expectancy-gains-threatened-as-more-older-americans-suffer-from-multiple-medical-conditions.html