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Chain Restaurants Reduce Calories on Menu Items
Large chain restaurants introduced items with fewer calories, 60 on average, in 2012 and 2013, a new JHSPH study finds. The move is likely in anticipation of new federal rules requiring calorie counts on menus. Learn More
Small Spills at Gas Stations Could Cause More Harm Than Thought
A new JHSPH study finds that small spills at gas stations could present public health risks over time due to soil and groundwater contamination in residential areas close to gas stations. Learn More
Talk Therapy, Not Medication, Better for Social Anxiety Disorder
Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), a form of talk therapy, proves more effective, with longer lasting effects after treatment, than medication, a new JHSPH study finds. Learn More
Drug Addiction More Stigmatized Than Mental Illness
A new JHSPH study found that people harbored more negative feelings toward drug addicts than those with mental illness. Both are treatable conditions. Learn More
The Medium Is the Text Message: Eat Healthy
A weekly text message reminder can improve awareness around healthy food choices and calorie budgets, including those on FDA-mandated food labels, a new study has found. Learn More

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  1. Changes at the Grocery Store Could Turn the Burden of Shopping With Children On Its Head

    Caretakers of children under age 16 propose changes at the grocery store, such as altering product placement, hosting healthy food tastings, to encourage healthier food choices by children, a Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health study finds.
    Thu, 23 Oct 2014 14:40:36 GMThttp://www.jhsph.edu/news/news-releases/2014/changes-at-the-grocery-store-could-turn-the-burden-of-shopping-with-children-its-head.html
  2. One-Quarter of Women in Rural Bangladesh Report Pregnancy and Childbirth Complications

    A new study led by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health shows that over one-quarter of women in rural Bangladesh experience complications during pregnancy -- hemorrhage and sepsis as the most commonly reported complications.
    Wed, 22 Oct 2014 16:37:40 GMThttp://www.jhsph.edu/news/news-releases/2014/one-quarter-of-women-in-rural-bangladesh-report-pregnancy-and-childbirth-complications.html
  3. Johns Hopkins Researchers Elected to Institute of Medicine

    Two pre-eminent Johns Hopkins researchers – and another who will join the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health in January – have been elected the Institute of Medicine (IOM), one of the highest honors in the fields of health and medicine.
    Mon, 20 Oct 2014 16:11:50 GMThttp://www.jhsph.edu/news/news-releases/2014/johns-hopkins-researchers-elected-to-institute-of-medicine.html
  4. Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health to Collaborate on New AIDS Research Project

    The Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health is one of six organizations that will collaborate on a five-year global initiative supported by an award from USAID that provides up to $70 million in funding.
    Mon, 20 Oct 2014 14:11:40 GMThttp://www.jhsph.edu/news/news-releases/2014/johns-hopkins-bloomberg-school of-public-health-to-collaborate-on-new-aids-research-project.html
  5. I Have to Walk How Many Miles to Burn Off This Soda?

    Easy-to-understand signs linking exercise to sugar-sweetened beverage consumption, including soda, helps teens make healthier choices, according to new Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health research.
    Thu, 16 Oct 2014 20:05:18 GMThttp://www.jhsph.edu/news/news-releases/2014/i-have to-walk-how-many-miles to-burn-off-this-soda.html
  6. In-Home Visits Reduce Drug Use, Depression In Pregnant Teens

    Successful intervention in American Indian communities could be used widely in low-income groups across the country, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health researchers say.
    Fri, 10 Oct 2014 14:21:40 GMThttp://www.jhsph.edu/news/news-releases/2014/in-home-visits-reduce-drug-use-depression-in-pregnant-teens.html
  7. Large Chain Restaurants Appear To Be Voluntarily Reducing Calories in Their Menu Items

    New research from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health finds that large chain restaurants introduced newer food and beverage options that, on average, contain 60 fewer calories than their traditional menu selections in 2012 and 2013.
    Wed, 08 Oct 2014 13:42:53 GMThttp://www.jhsph.edu/news/news-releases/2014/large-chain-restaurants-appear-to-be-voluntarily-reducing-calories-in-their-menu-items.html
  8. Mathuram Santosham Receives 2014 Fries Prize for Improving Health

    Mathuram Santosham, MD, MPH, a professor at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and director of the Johns Hopkins Center for American Indian Health, has been awarded the 2014 Fries Prize for Improving Health.
    Tue, 07 Oct 2014 20:10:34 GMThttp://www.jhsph.edu/news/news-releases/2014/mathuram-santosham-receives-2014-fries-prize-for-improving-health.html
  9. Small Spills at Gas Stations Could Cause Significant Public Health Risks Over Time

    A new study suggests that drops of fuel spilled at gas stations — which occur frequently with fill-ups — could cumulatively be causing long-term environmental damage to soil and groundwater in residential areas in close proximity to the stations.
    Tue, 07 Oct 2014 16:02:30 GMThttp://www.jhsph.edu/news/news-releases/2014/small-spills-at-gas-stations-could-cause-significant-public-health-risks-over-time.html
  10. Study: Public Feels More Negative Toward People With Drug Addiction Than Those With Mental Illness

    People are significantly more likely to have negative attitudes toward those suffering from drug addiction than those with mental illness, and don't support basic benefits for them, new Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health research suggests.
    Wed, 01 Oct 2014 13:47:33 GMThttp://www.jhsph.edu/news/news-releases/2014/study-public-feels-more-negative-toward-people-with-drug-addiction-than-those-with-mental-illness.html