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Environmental Health Sciences

Course Offerings & Schedule

TWO WEEK COURSES

June 1-19, 2015

Full-Day Course

182.614.11 Industrial Hygiene Laboratory

5 Credits
June 8-19, 2015 (8:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.) 10 class days
(Lectures and Labs)

Morning Courses

180.601.61 Environmental Health

5 Credits
June 1-12, 2015 (8:00 a.m. - 11:50 a.m.) 10 class days
*This is a blended course: there is an online component that must be completed before class starts on June 1.

187.610.11 Public Health Toxicology

4 Credits
CLASS CANCELLED DUE TO LOW ENROLLMENT

Afternoon Courses

180.606.11 Case Studies in Food Production and Public Health

4 credits
CLASS CANCELLED DUE TO LOW ENROLLMENT

183.631.11 Fundamentals of Human Physiology

4 Credits
June 1-12, 2015 (1:30 p.m. - 4:20 p.m.) 10 class days

340.680.11 Environmental and Occupational Epidemiology

4 Credits
June 1-12, 2015 (1:30 p.m. - 4:20 p.m.) 10 class days


ONE-WEEK COURSE

180.607.11 Climate Change and Public Health

3 Credits
June 1-5, 2015 (1:30 p.m. - 4:20 p.m.)
Saturday, June 6, 2015 (8:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.) Full day field trip


ONE-DAY SHORT COURSES

180.613.11 Air Sampling Workshop

1 Credit
Saturday, June 13, 2015 (9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.)

180.656.11 Risk Analysis of Engineered Nanomaterials

1 Credit
CLASS CANCELLED DUE TO LOW ENROLLMENT

180.617.11 Aquaculture, Seafood, and Public Health

1 Credit
Saturday, June 13, 2015 (9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.)

For more information about the Environmental Health Sciences Summer Institute contact Ms. Carla Reinhard at 410-502-0742 or creinha2@jhu.edu.

If you need help identifying which courses overlap, please print the master course schedule.


Course Descriptions & Details

TWO-WEEK COURSES, JUNE 1-19, 2015

182.614.11 INDUSTRIAL HYGIENE LABORATORY

5 Credits
June 8-19, 2015 (8:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.)
Course Instructors: Ana Rule, PhD; Peter Lees, PhD

Uses laboratory and field methods and equipment to appraise occupational and environmental atmospheric conditions. Topics include grab and dynamic sampling; measurement of respirable and non-respirable particulates; particulates size analysis; fiber sampling and analysis; gas and vapor sampling and analysis by wet chemical and instrumental methods; and calibration of direct reading field survey instruments.

Learning Objectives:

Upon successfully completing this course, students will be able to:
1) Calibrate air sampling pumps using primary and secondary standards
2) Conduct air sampling for airborne particulate matter
3) Define criteria and equipment used for size-selective particulate matter sampling
4) Conduct air sampling for airborne gases and vapors
5) Describe adsorptive and absorptive sampling techniques
6) Select appropriate analytical techniques for air sample analysis
7) Conduct air sampling using direct-reading instruments
8) Perform a survey for airborne contaminants
9) Write a professional report for air sample survey results

Method of Student Evaluation: Written lab reports and a field project.


187.610.11 PUBLIC HEALTH TOXICOLOGY 

4 Credits
June 1-12, 2015 THIS COURSE HAS BEEN CANCELLED DUE TO LOW ENROLLMENT
Course Instructors: Michael Trush, PhD; James Yager, PhD

Students examine basic concepts of toxicology as they apply to the effects of environmental agents, e.g. chemicals, metals, on public health. We discuss the distribution, cellular penetration, metabolic conversion, and elimination of toxic agents, as well as the fundamental laws governing the interaction of foreign chemicals with biological systems. Students focus on the application of these concepts to the understanding and prevention of morbidity and mortality resulting from environmental exposures to toxic substances through a case study format.

Learning Objectives
Upon successfully completing this course, students will be able to:
1) Describe the chemical properties and the biological processes which modulate the toxicokinetics of chemical agents of public health importance.
2) Explain the significance of biotransformation reactions as a determinant of the toxicokinetic and toxicodynamic activities of chemicals.
3) Describe molecular, cellular and pathophysiological responses resulting from exposure to chemical agents relevant to human health.
4) Identify underlying susceptibility factors which contribute to the ability of chemicals to elicit bioeffects which contribute to human disease.
5) Explain the science underlying testing for the ability of chemicals to elicit adverse human health effects.
6) Put into perspective the role of toxicology in the risk assessment process.

Prerequisites: Background in college biochemistry and cell biology strongly encouraged.
Method of Student Evaluation: Student evaluation is based on six on-line quizzes at 12 points each, two individual written assignments at 30 and 50 points, and a mid-course and final exam at 100 points each.


180.606.11 CASE STUDIES IN FOOD PRODUCTION AND PUBLIC HEALTH

4 Credits
June 1-12, 2015 THIS COURSE HAS BEEN CANCELLED DUE TO LOW ENROLLMENT
Course Instructor: Keeve Nachman, PhD, MHS

Focuses on food production practices in the United States and the associated public health risks and benefits; discussions on animal and crop agriculture and food processing encompass both historical practices and modern methods. Presents case studies which delve deeper into specific topics, including industrial food animal production, aquaculture, veterinary drugs, agricultural policy, chemical exposures, rural communities and food animal worker health, and sustainable production methods. Lectures draw from the literature, and from the firsthand experiences of lecturers in research translation and agricultural production.

Learning Objectives
1) Upon successfully completing this course, students will be able to:
2) Describe in detail the major steps of the food production process, from farm to retail
3) Identify practices associated with crop and food animal production that may threaten public health
4) Inventory the pathways by which hazardous agents from farms reach humans
5) Categorize impacts of food production practices by affected population subgroups
6) Identify alternative farming and distribution practices that may protect public health

Method of Student Evaluation: Class Participation 30%, Final Exam 70%


180.601.61 ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH

5 Credits
June 1-12, 2015 (8:00 a.m. - 11:50 a.m.)
Course Instructors: Joseph Bressler, PhD

Examines health issues, scientific understanding of causes, and possible future approaches to control of the major environmental health problems in industrialized and developing countries. Topics include how the body reacts to environmental pollutants; physical, chemical, and biological agents of environmental contamination; vectors for dissemination (air, water, soil); solid and hazardous waste; susceptible populations; biomarkers and risk analysis; the scientific basis for policy decisions; and emerging global environmental health problems.

*Please note: This course is a modified blended course. Students are expected to prepare, listen, and read materials PRIOR to the class meetings. It is critical that students participate in the online lectures and readings in order to be prepared for the class meetings.

Learning Objectives
Upon successfully completing this course, students will be able to:
1) Define the major environmental agents (i.e. environmental chemical, biological, and physical agents that cause adverse effects on human health) and their sources
2) Discuss the transport and fate of these agents in the environment, and identify the carriers or vectors (air, water, soil, and food) that promote the transfer of these agents from the environment to the human
3) Describe the toxicokinetics of these agents in the body, including the effect of route of entry (inhalation, ingestion, absorption)
4) Describe the toxicodynamics of these agents, including biotransformation and the mechanisms by which they exert adverse health effects, and the use of models for prediction of the magnitude of adverse effects
5) Identify and define the steps in the risk assessment process, including both exposure and dose-response assessment, and the sources and magnitude of uncertainty
6) Describe various risk management approaches, including regulatory, engineering, and behavioral/risk communication options
7) Describe specific genetic factors (including gender- and ethnicity-related factors), physiologic factors (including age- and health status-related factors), and psychosocial factors (including SES- and social/cultural-related factors) that influence the risk of exposure and/or the likelihood of developing adverse health outcomes from exposure to environmental agents
8) Identify techniques for improving risk assessment and risk management strategies, including consideration of: (a) factors in the physical environment, (b) factors in the social environment, (c) community-based participation in both the assessment/management process and in basic environmental/public health research, and (d) issues of environmental justice/equity

Prerequisites: College courses in general biology, algebra, and physics or chemistry.

Method of Student Evaluation: Student evaluation will be based on 3 exams (equally weighted), which will include content from the online lectures that should be reviewed prior to the start of the face-to-face portion of the class.


340.680.11 ENVIRONMENTAL AND OCCUPATIONAL EPIDEMIOLOGY

4 Credits
June 1-12, 2015 (1:30 p.m. - 4:20 p.m.)
Course Instructor: Ana Navas-Acien, MD

Introduces the key health effects of environmental exposures and the epidemiologic methods used to identify and estimate those effects. Emphasizes the interplay of methodological issues, including the assessment of environmental exposures and the understanding of specific disease processes in identifying the health impact of environmental exposures in the population. Students learn about environmental exposures (including water and air pollution, food contamination, ionizing radiation, persistent environmental pollutants and emergent environmental exposures) and key methodological issues relevant for these exposures in population studies (including study design, exposure assessment and biomonitoring, disease clusters, dose-response relationships, susceptibility, geographic analysis, and evidence synthesis).

Learning Objectives
Upon successfully completing this course, students will be able to:

1) Identify the major environmental and risk factors for health-related outcomes in human populations
2) Explain the key methodological issues relevant to the identification and estimation of the burden of disease caused by environmental factors
3) Describe the pattern of burden of disease in a country using standard fertility and mortality indicators, estimates of disease burden measured in Disability-Adjusted Life Years (DALYs), data on disease incidence, prevalence, risk factors and geographic distribution and the concept of epidemiologic transition
4) Describe and analyze environmental health problems, and discuss exposure-disease relationships in human populations

Method of Student Evaluation: Mid-term paper (30%) Final exam (60%) Class participation (10%)


183.631.11 FUNDAMENTALS OF HUMAN PHYSIOLOGY

4 Credits
June 1-12, 2015 (1:30 p.m. - 4:20 p.m.) 10 class days
Course Instructor: Clarke Tankersley, PhD

Encompasses the integration of a variety of organ systems. Invites leading scientists in different fields of physiology to offer exceptional and up-to-date lectures that quickly move through the basic mechanistic principles. Applies basic mechanistic principles of each organ system to current public health issues and environmentally relevant topics.

Learning Objectives
Upon successfully completing this course, students will be able to:
1) Use their discussion of functional principles at the genetic, cellular and organ levels to describe the concepts of integrated systems physiology in humans
2) Apply these basic physiological principles to strategies for the solution of current and emerging relevant environmental health issues
3) Explain and discuss the significance of these principles in interaction with a broad spectrum of public health professionals

Method of Student Evaluation: Exams


ONE-WEEK COURSES


180.607.11 CLIMATE CHANGE AND PUBLIC HEALTH

3 Credits
June 1-5, 2015 (1:30 p.m. - 4:20 p.m.)
Saturday, June 6, 2015 (8:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.) Full day field trip
Course Instructors: Cindy L. Parker, MD, MPH

Explores the science of how and why the climate is changing, as well as the likely and potential impacts of climate change on public health in developed and developing regions of the world. Discusses how rising sea levels; worsening air quality; frequency and severity of weather-related disasters; and scarcity of food and drinking water are all influenced by the changing climate. Examines strategies for mitigation and adaptation, and the role public health professionals can play in these decisions. Concludes with a full-day field trip in the Baltimore area to get hands-on experience with local responses to climate change.

Learning Objectives
1) Explain the greenhouse effect and the resulting changes to the physical processes on Earth from climate change
2) List and prioritize direct and indirect health impacts of climate change
3) Compare and contrast strategies for climate change mitigation and adaptation with respect to co-benefits to public health
4) Describe potential actions of public health professionals to address climate change

Method of Student Evaluation: Homework assignments (4 x 10% each), participation (20%), final assignment (40%)


ONE-DAY SHORT COURSES


180.613.11 AIR SAMPLING WORKSHOP

1 Credit
Saturday, June 13, 2015 (9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.)
Course Instructor: Ana Rule, PhD, MHS

Introduces students to air sampling for occupational and environmental air pollutants. Discusses equipment calibration; passive and active sampling for gases and vapors; particulate matter (PM) sampling (including rationale and methods for conducting size-selective sampling); special methods for PM sampling (fibers, mold); and direct reading instruments. Discusses time weighted averaging, limits of detection, exposure standards and guidelines, and reporting of results. Demonstrations of sampling equipment will be conducted during the course as time permits.

Learning Objectives
Upon successfully completing this workshop, students will be able to:
1) Explain the importance of calibrating air sampling equipment
2) Select an air sampling method appropriate to the pollutant in question
3) Define criteria and equipment used for size-selective particulate matter sampling
4) Define criteria and equipment used for gas and vapor sampling
5) Describe adsorptive and absorptive gas and vapor sampling techniques
6) Select appropriate analytical techniques for air sample analysis
7) Compare and contrast the advantages and disadvantages of direct-reading instruments
8) Describe relevant standards and guidelines

Method of Student Evaluation: Quiz 100%

Target Audience: Practicing public health professionals with responsibilities for health, safety, and environmental matters in government agencies, non-government organizations, and industry; and for students who are interested in learning more about environmental health sciences concepts.


180.656.11 RISK ANALYSIS OF ENGINEERED NANOMATERIALS

1 Credit
Saturday, June 13, 2015 THIS COURSE HAS BEEN CANCELLED DUE TO LOW ENROLLMENT
Course Instructor: Ronald White, M.S.T.

Students apply environmental health risk analysis techniques (risk assessment, risk management, risk communication) to the use of engineered nanomaterials in nanotechnology and products. Discusses how nanomaterials are used in consumer, industrial and medical products and their potential health risks. Explores the current and emerging approaches for nanotoxicology, and examines nanomaterial fate and transport in the environment. Assesses the determination of nanomaterial exposures and explores various approaches to the management and communication of nanotechnology risks and benefits.

Learning Objectives
Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:
1) Describe how fundamental principles of risk assessment, risk management and risk communication are used for engineered nanomaterial products and technologies
2) Identify key issues and approaches to assessing and managing the health impacts of engineered nanomaterials

Prerequisites: Introduction to the Risk Sciences and Public Policy or equivalent academic training or professional experience. Consent required for auditors and students with no previous training in the risk sciences.

Method of Student Evaluation: Grading for the course will be based on the following components: final paper (75%) and class participation (25%)


180.617.11 AQUACULTURE, SEAFOOD AND PUBLIC HEALTH

1 Credit
Saturday, June 13, 2015 (9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.)
Course Instructor: David Love, PhD, MSPH

Seafood is an important source of nutrients and protein, but it is often sourced in unsustainable ways, including certain wild and farmed production methods. We will examine the public health and environmental impacts of fishing and aquaculture production methods. Through lectures we introduce students to important relationships between seafood production and consumption, and provide a tangible real-life experience with an alternative small-scale aquaponics system. Using hands-on experiences we will explore how aquaponics systems are increasingly recognized for their potential to improve food security in urban environments and for their educational opportunities.

The class will be held at the Cylburn Arboretum and will be conducted in two parts: the morning session will consist of lecture and discussion; afternoon session will consist of demonstrative experiences in the Center for a Livable Future Aquaponics greenhouse. Discussions about crop selection, water testing, integrated pest management, and greenhouse management will be integrated into the experience.

Learning Objectives
Upon successfully completing this course, students will be able to:
1) Describe the connections between aquaculture, seafood, public health, and the environment
2) Compare alternative methods of seafood production
3) Assess the potential contribution of aquaponics to the aquaculture industry and to the broader concept of food security

Method of Student Evaluation: Short written assignment 100% of grade