In November 2016, Moore Center staff attended the 35th Annual Research and Treatment Conference sponsored by the Association for the Treatment of Sexual Abusers (ATSA) in Orlando. The focus this year was “Different Roles, Same Goals: Preventing Sexual Abuse.”

The Moore Center research team presented current projects to researchers, scholars, treatment providers, advocates and other ATSA members. Below is a quick recap of those presentations:

Moving the Field: Developments in the Assessment, Treatment, and Prevention of Sexual Abuse by R. Karl Hanson, Mark E. Oliver and Elizabeth J. Letourneau

  • Speakers presented the argument that child sexual abuse is a preventable public health problem and maintained that focusing on prevention of youth-perpetrated sexual harm is a worthwhile and feasible endeavor.

Help Wanted Project: Addressing Needs of Adolescents Sexually Attracted to Children by Ryan T. Shields and Amanda Ruzicka

  • Speakers presented a general description of the interview subjects (individuals with a sexual interest in children, but who have not acted on their attraction) and common themes.
  • Subjects reported attempting to seek help but were unable to find any.
  • They also reported that their main struggle was not refraining from acting on their attraction, but rather with figuring out how to cope with such an attraction and how to live a happy and healthy life.

Impact of Sex Crime Policies on Youth and Their Families by Geoffrey Kahn and Cierra Buckman

  • Key findings from this study include that youth who are required to register as sex offenders are four times more likely to have attempted suicide in the past 30 days and are three times more likely to be approached by an adult for sex than youth who do not have to register. 
  • Caregivers of youth who are required to register experience an increased average number of negative consequences than those who are not required to register. 

ATSA’s mission is dedicated to preventing sexual abuse through research, education and shared learning and the effective management of individuals who have sexually abused or who are at risk of doing so. The annual conferences attract around 1400 attendees and have hundreds of speakers.