Johns Hopkins International Injury Research Unit (JH-IIRU) scientists Drs. Qingfeng Li and Nino Paichadze conducted a workshop on advanced analytical methods for injury data on June 11 and 12, 2018 in Hanoi, Vietnam. Held as a product of the Johns Hopkins University-Hanoi School of Public Health Trauma and Injury Research Program in Vietnam (JHU-Hanoi-TRIP), the sessions welcomed about 50 participants from Hanoi Preventive Medicine Center, Hanoi Medical University, Hanoi School of Public Health (HUPH), among other institutions.

“This training workshop went quite well,” said JH-IIRU Associate Director Qingfeng Li, PhD, MHS. “Through our partnership with the Hanoi School of Public Health, we’ve been able to lead critical trauma and injury training sessions to passionate students and public health practitioners in Vietnam.”

Following opening remarks from Dr. Cuong Pham, director of the Center for Injury Policy and Prevention Research (CIPPR) at Hanoi University of Public Health, Dr. Li kicked off the training with a presentation on the principles of injury prevention before Dr. Paichadze held sessions on the risk factors for trauma and injuries, and data sources for trauma and injuries.

On the workshop’s second day, participants were engaged in group exercises to analyze sample injury data using statistical methods introduced by Dr. Li on day one. Each group made presentation on their work and received feedback from Dr. Li.

After the workshop Dr. Paichadze led a seminar on Information and communications technology (ICT) approaches for capacity building in public health.

JHU-Hanoi-TRIP spawned from a five-year grant on injury training in Vietnam from the Fogarty International Center of the National Institutes of Health (NIH). The grant builds on existing collaboration between the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and HUPH and addresses global injury barriers through a collaborative training program. The program’s overall goal is to strengthen research capacity on injury and trauma in Vietnam, as well as its long-term health, economic, and societal consequences through an innovative model of sustainable capacity development.

To learn more about the program and grant, please click here.

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Instructors and participants join together for a picture at the conclusion of the workshop in Hanoi, Vietnam.