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Johns Hopkins International Injury Research Unit

A World Health Organization Collaborating Center for Injuries, Violence and Accident Prevention

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Keyword: uganda

On Friday, March 8, 2019, research from the Johns Hopkins International Injury Research Unit team was presented at the 10th Annual Consortium of Universities for Global Health (CUGH) conference.

Doctoral Candidate Nukhba Zia presented a pair of posters stemming from JH-IIRU’s traumatic brain injury (TBI) project in Uganda.

In “Traumatic Brain Injury in Uganda – Development of Hospital Based m-health Registry Using Injury Surveillance Framework,” JH-IIRU researchers and collaborators took a scientific approach to data collection in low- and middle-income countries, and detailed the steps of developing an internet-based TBI registry in Uganda.

Zia also presented on behalf of the team in the poster on “Causes and Outcomes of Unintentional and Intentional Traumatic Brain Injuries among Children in Uganda: Analysis from Hospital-Based Traumatic Brain Injury Registry,” which assessed the causes and outcomes of unintentional and intentional TBI among children presenting to a tertiary-care hospital in Uganda.

The Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health was well represented with exhibitors, as Global Health NOW and the Department of International Health greeted conference visitors in the conference exhibition.

To learn more about the annual CUGH conference, please click here.

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JH-IIRU Doctoral Candidate Nukhba Zia presents a pair of posters at the 10th Annual CUGH Conference on March 8, 2019.

Professor Rashid Jooma, a renowned neurosurgeon from Aga Khan University, Pakistan and former Director-General Health of the country visited Markerere University School of Public Health as part of the “Traumatic Brain Injury Across the Lifespan in Uganda” project. This project is a partnership between the Johns Hopkins International Injury Research Unit (JH-IIRU) at Johns Hopkins University and the Makerere University School of Public Health and its affiliated Mulago National Referral Hospital in Uganda, funded by the Fogarty International Center of the U.S. National Institutes of Health.

During the visit, Dr. Jooma engaged with several neurosurgery colleagues through lectures, as well as teaching sessions. In addition to visiting Makerere University, Dr. Jooma and associates toured Mulago Hospital in Kampala, Uganda, where he reviewed the proposed traumatic brain injury management protocol for the hospital.

“Kampala was exciting and our colleagues were very welcoming,” said Dr. Jooma. “I spent some time with the neuro surgical team and got a good sense of their work and challenges. Thus, when it came to reviewing the head injury guidelines, we were in a better position to factor in the local context and produce a final product that may be more useful.”

Dr. Jooma’s visit supports the overall goal of the traumatic brain injury (TBI) program to strengthen research capacity on the prevention, hospital based care, and economic consequences of traumatic brain injuries across the lifespan in Uganda through an innovative model of sustainable capacity development.

Dr. Amber Mehmood, Assistant Scientist at JH-IIRU and project manager said, “Dr. Jooma’s visit is one of the culminating experiences of our TBI project and shows how we have enabled south-south interactions as part of this study.”

For more information, see the TBI project description here.

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Dr. Rashid Jooma presents on traumatic brain injuries at Makerere University School of Public Health. 

The Johns Hopkins University-Makerere University Chronic Consequences of Trauma, Injuries and Disability in Uganda (JHU-MU Chronic TRIAD), is funded by the Fogarty International Center of the National Institutes of Health. Coordinated by the Johns Hopkins International Injury Research Unit (JH-IIRU) in the Department of International Health at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, the JHU-MU Chronic TRIAD supports four cohorts of long-term trainees.

In February, five fellows from our third cohort successfully defended their TRIAD-related dissertations and graduated from the program.

The JHU-MU Chronic TRIAD program aims to strengthen research capacity on the long-term health and economic consequences of trauma, injuries and disability across the lifespan in Uganda through an innovative model of sustainable capacity development.

The program is based on the close partnership between Johns Hopkins and Makerere University School of Public Health, two academic institutions with a strong commitment to understanding the long-term impact of trauma and injuries, experience in research, and a history of collaborative work.

Learn more about the program here.

Below are the fellows and their dissertation titles: 

  Chronic TRIAD Jennifer
 
Jennifer Namagembe successfully defended her dissertation, “Assessment of the nature of pre-hospital care provided to road traffic injury patients reporting to Mulago Hospital.”
 
  Chronic TRIAD fellow Claire
 
Claire Biribawa successfully defended her dissertation, “Alcohol intoxication among bodaboda drivers, related injuries and health costs at Mulago National Hospital.” 
 
 Chronic TRIAD Fellow Phoebe

Phoebe Alitubeera, a fellow from our supplementary training program on the intersection between Trauma/Disability and HIV in Uganda (JHU-MU supplementary grant), successfully defended her dissertation, “Utilization of post exposure prophylaxis among health workers following percutaneous injuries in public health facilities in Kampala Capital City.”

  Chronic TRIAD Arthur

Arthur Kiconco successfully defended his dissertation, “Determinants of occupational injuries among building construction workers in Kampala City, Uganda.” 

  Chronic TRIAD Lillian

Lilian Kauma, a fellow from our supplementary training program on the intersection between Trauma/Disability and HIV in Uganda (JHU-MU supplementary grant), successfully defended her dissertation, “HIV-related disabilities and utilization of rehabilitation services by people living with HIV receiving care at the Mulago Immune Suppresive Syndrome Clinic, Kampala, Uganda.” 

The Johns Hopkins International Injury Research Unit was recently awarded a five-year training grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to study trauma, injuries and disabilities in Uganda. The Johns Hopkins – Makerere University Chronic Consequences of Trauma, Injuries and Disability (JHU-MU Chronic-TRIAD) award will allow researchers from the Johns Hopkins International Injury Research Unit (JH-IIRU) to strengthen research capacity on the long-term health and economic consequences of trauma, injuries and disability across the lifespan in Uganda.

JH-IIRU director, Adnan A. Hyder, will lead a team that includes faculty and researchers from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine and Makerere University School of Public Health in Uganda. Dr. Olive Kobusingye, a well-known expert in trauma and injury prevention in Africa and developing nations, will lead the project for Makerere University.The team will develop a collaborative program that will train a core group of researchers in Uganda to generate relevant data and apply it for promotion of key national priorities to reduce the growing chronic burden of disability from trauma and injuries across the lifespan.  In addition the team will also establish a sustainable training program that will provide a home for faculty across Makerere University, and develop an annual forum in collaboration with the Ugandan Ministry of Health for research-to-policy dialogue on the chronic consequences of trauma, injuries and disabilities.

To read more about this new grant, visit the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health news page:
http://www.jhsph.edu/news/news-releases/2012/hyder_trauma_research.html

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