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Keyword: road safety

COVID-19 Lockdown Led to Relative Increase in Speed-Related Traffic Violations and Fatal Crashes in Japan

As a result of COVID-19, government-implemented lockdowns led to a relative increase in speed-related traffic law violations and fatal motor vehicle collisions in Japan, according to research at the Johns Hopkins International Injury Research Unit.

Using police-reported data on the number of fatal motor vehicle collisions between January 2010 and February 2020, researchers forecasted the number of fatal collisions per day from March to May 2020, when Japan was under COVID-19 lockdown. Over the 10 years of data analysis in the country of more than 120 million people, the team reviewed 37,000 fatal collisions.

“Through this work, we can conclude that drivers who continued to drive during the lockdown were in fact more likely to commit speed-related violations that cause fatal motor vehicle collisions than the overall drivers did before the lockdown,” said study lead author Haruhiko Inada. “It is necessary for road users and law enforcement to understand that drivers who remain on the road during a lockdown can be at an increased risk for committing such violations that result in fatal motor vehicle collisions.”

The findings, published online on October 16 in Injury Prevention, could build upon the growing conversation on the pandemic’s effect on global public health, specifically road safety.

“COVID-19 lockdown and fatal motor vehicle collisions due to speed-related traffic violations in Japan: a time-series study” was written by Haruhiko Inada, Lamisa Ashraf, and Sachalee Campbell.

To learn more about the research, please click here.

Study Finds Enforcement Efforts Effective in Increasing Correct Motorcycle Helmet Use in Colombia

The presence of enforcement increases the correct use of motorcycle helmets, according to a study led by researchers at the Johns Hopkins International Injury Research Unit and Grupo SUR at Universidad de los Andes.

Semiannual observational studies of motorcycle users in six randomly selected sites in Bogota were conducted between 2015 and 2018. In observing more than 70,000 motorcycles, researchers found that enforcement, increases the correct use of helmets especially in principal roads.

“Our work emphasizes the direct relationship between enforcement and correct helmet use among motorcyclists,” said lead author Luis A. Guzman of Universidad de los Andes. “And it is critically important to understand how we can better protect our motorcyclists and encourage correct helmet use. Here in Colombia the number of motorcyclists has nearly doubled between 2013 and 2018.”

The findings, published online August 21 in Traffic Injury Prevention, could help inform decision makers all across the globe and particularly in low- and middle-income countries where evidence-based road safety interventions are most needed.

In the work, researchers also found that though 99% of drivers and passengers wore helmets, only 89% of drivers and 82% of passengers used them correctly. Female, adult, and single riders were are all more likely to correctly wear helmets. The study also noted a relationship between the concentration of fatalities and incorrect helmet use in 80% of the observational sites.

“The relationships between correct helmet use, enforcement presence, and mortality in a Latin-America city: The case study of Bogota, Colombia” was written by Luis A. Guzman, Andres Ignacio Vecino Ortiz, Vanessa Guzman Mesa, Jose Pablo Camargo, Katharine A. Allen, and Adnan A. Hyder.

To learn more about the research, please click here.

Johns Hopkins International Injury Research Unit Leadership Participates in Latest United Nations Road Safety Collaboration Meeting

Dr. Abdul Bachani, Director of the Johns Hopkins International Injury Research Unit (JH-IIRU), will be in Geneva, Switzerland on October 29-30, 2019 for the 28th UN Road Safety Collaboration (UNRSC) meeting. Dr. Bachani joins road safety experts and collaborators from around the world.

While in Geneva, members of the UNRSC will participate in critical conversations on global road safety and also prepare for the 3rd Global Ministerial Conference on Road Safety held in Stockholm, Sweden on February 19-20, 2020. A member of the High Level Consultative Committee, Dr. Bachani and JH-IIRU have been closely involved in preparations for the conference....Click here to read more.

Johns Hopkins International Injury Research Unit Co-Hosts Global Road Safety Leadership Course

From September 8 to September 20, 2019, the Johns Hopkins International Injury Research Unit and Global Road Safety Partnership co-led a two-week training course on road safety in Baltimore, Maryland.

Supported by Bloomberg Philanthropies, the course included more than 60 participants from 30 low- and middle-income countries around the world. Over the two weeks, participants and organizers -- including leadership, faculty, and staff from JH-IIRU -- worked to build leadership capacity to design, advocate for, and implement effective road safety programs and policies....Click here to read more.

Johns Hopkins International Injury Research Unit Co-Leads Road Safety Course in Fortaleza

Leadership and faculty from the Johns Hopkins International Injury Research Unit (JH-IIRU), and international partners led a one-week road safety course on the campus of Universidade de Fortaleza (UNIFOR) from August 5-9, 2019. The course, “Implementing Effective Road Safety Programs: Translating evidence to practice for road safety,” invited more than 70 participants from 20+ different cities in Brazil to gain training on the most important aspects of road safety through theoretical and practical sessions tailored for the Brazilian context.

JH-IIRU Director Dr. Abdul Bachani, along with core JH-IIRU faculty Dr. Andres Vecino Ortiz, and partners at the Global Road Safety Partnership and UNIFOR, based the course off of the twice-annual Global Road Safety Leadership Course (GRSLC), which builds leadership capacity to design, advocate for, and implement effective road safety programs and policies.

“This past week here in Fortaleza has demonstrated the investment the city and its local and regional leaders are making to improve road safety,” said Dr. Bachani. “The passion our Brazilian participants have in making their communities better, safer places is inspirational. We look forward to seeing this group apply lessons learned in the course in their day-to-day work.”

With sessions on everything from risk factors and leadership principles to successful cases of multisectoral action for road safety, the comprehensive curriculum sought to generate evidence-based skills and knowledge to the local and regional leaders in road safety, so they can improve design and policies in their own municipalities and departments.

Site visits – to such locations as roadside police checkpoints, bus rapid transit system, and local children’s hospital – provided participants with real-world applications of course content. Also, throughout the course, participants were divided into smaller cohorts for group work, before delivering final presentations at the conclusion of the course.

A number of GRSLC alumni reunited with course organizers. Luiza Amorim (GRSLC 2017), Omar Jacob (rGRSLC 2018), Dante Rosado (GRSLC2017), Flavio Cunto (GRSLC 2018), and Andre Correia (rGRSLC 2019), all led sessions during this offering, demonstrating the real impact that the Global Road Safety Leadership Course is having on creating leaders in road safety.

“It was marvelous,” said Correia, Enforcement Coordinator with the Bloomberg Initiative for Global Road Safety in Fortaleza. “We got to share the same [road safety] problems, but even better, we looked for solutions together. We are in a globalized world, we need to find those solutions together.”

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JH-IIRU Director Dr. Abdul Bachani presents during the one-week road safety course in Fortaleza.