Skip Navigation

Johns Hopkins International Injury Research Unit

A World Health Organization Collaborating Center for Injuries, Violence and Accident Prevention

Bookmark and Share

News

Keyword: injuries

On May 14, 2018, the Johns Hopkins International Injury Research Unit (JH-IIRU) hosted a panel of trauma and emergency care experts at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health as part of its ongoing 10th anniversary year. The event, “Trauma and Emergency Care across the Lifespan,” featured multidisciplinary trauma experts JH-IIRU associate director Amber Mehmood and senior technical advisor Junaid Razzak, as well as Safe Kids Worldwide founder Dr. Martin Eichelberger.

JH-IIRU director Adnan A. Hyder welcomed participants—watching both in-person and via a streaming webcast—to the event before deputy director Abdul M. Bachani introduced each panelist and facilitated discussion at the conclusion of each presentation.

Razzak led off the series of speakers with a presentation on emergency care in Pakistan. In his talk, he outlined the definition of an emergency care system and focused on Karachi, Pakistan—the third-largest city in the world.

Mehmood followed with a talk on trauma care in low-income countries and shared a case study on traumatic brain injury (TBI) across the lifespan in Uganda. She shared new results from a collaborative effort with JH-IIRU and Makerere University: a third of all patients presenting with TBI suffered a drop in the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS), a critical indicator, during emergency department stay. This finding, Mehmood remarked, should lead to improved assessment and interventions.

Dr. Eichelberger, in the final presentation of the event, discussed pediatric trauma. From his work at Children’s National Medical Center and Safe Kids Worldwide, Dr. Eichelberger shared childhood injury statistics both domestically and globally.

In 2018, the Johns Hopkins International Injury Research Unit is celebrating its first decade of innovation and research in global injury prevention and control. To honor the anniversary, JH-IIRU is hosting a number of special events throughout the year. To learn more about the Unit and its 10th anniversary, please click here.

alt

Dr. Martin Eichelberger presents on pediatric trauma during JH-IIRU’s 10th anniversary event, “Trauma and Emergency Care across the Lifespan,” at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health on May 14, 2018.

Professor Rashid Jooma, a renowned neurosurgeon from Aga Khan University, Pakistan and former Director-General Health of the country visited Markerere University School of Public Health as part of the “Traumatic Brain Injury Across the Lifespan in Uganda” project. This project is a partnership between the Johns Hopkins International Injury Research Unit (JH-IIRU) at Johns Hopkins University and the Makerere University School of Public Health and its affiliated Mulago National Referral Hospital in Uganda, funded by the Fogarty International Center of the U.S. National Institutes of Health.

During the visit, Dr. Jooma engaged with several neurosurgery colleagues through lectures, as well as teaching sessions. In addition to visiting Makerere University, Dr. Jooma and associates toured Mulago Hospital in Kampala, Uganda, where he reviewed the proposed traumatic brain injury management protocol for the hospital.

“Kampala was exciting and our colleagues were very welcoming,” said Dr. Jooma. “I spent some time with the neuro surgical team and got a good sense of their work and challenges. Thus, when it came to reviewing the head injury guidelines, we were in a better position to factor in the local context and produce a final product that may be more useful.”

Dr. Jooma’s visit supports the overall goal of the traumatic brain injury (TBI) program to strengthen research capacity on the prevention, hospital based care, and economic consequences of traumatic brain injuries across the lifespan in Uganda through an innovative model of sustainable capacity development.

Dr. Amber Mehmood, Assistant Scientist at JH-IIRU and project manager said, “Dr. Jooma’s visit is one of the culminating experiences of our TBI project and shows how we have enabled south-south interactions as part of this study.”

For more information, see the TBI project description here.

alt text

Dr. Rashid Jooma presents on traumatic brain injuries at Makerere University School of Public Health. 

On May 10-11, 2017, Johns Hopkins International Injury Research Unit (JH-IIRU) faculty, including Drs. Adnan Hyder, Abdul Bachani and Nino Paichadze together with colleagues from Makerere University School of Public Health, Drs. Olive Kobusingye and Milton Mutto, participated in a Fogarty International Center (FIC) Noncommunicable Diseases (NCD) Networking Meeting in Rockville, MD. The goal of the meeting was to highlight the FIC grantees under the Chronic, Non-Communicable Diseases and Disorders Across the Lifespan Program. The meeting consisted of workshops, oral presentations and poster presentations from both researchers and trainees.

Dr. Hyder panel discussion

Dr. Hyder participates in a panel discussion 

On the first day of the two-day meeting, Dr. Hyder presented “Building Capacity for Injury Research: A Case Study from Uganda” to highlight the results and achievements of the Johns Hopkins University-Makerere University Chronic Consequences of Trauma, Injury and Disability in Uganda (Chronic TRIAD) Program. Following his presentation, Dr. Hyder participated in a panel discussion alongside Dr. Isabel Scarinci, University of Alabama at Birmingham; Dr. Gail Wyatt, University of California, Los Angeles; Dr. Erausquin, University of South Florida and Dr. Kobusingye, Makerere University.  On the second day of the meeting, the Chronic TRIAD project team presented a poster.

The objectives of the meeting were to: provide a forum for both researchers and trainees to share their research findings through talks and posters; provide opportunities for investigators to network with each other and deepen the collective understanding of research capacity building at in-country sites and engage in thoughtful discussion about current and future work.

To read more about the Chronic TRIAD program, please click here.

Drs. Nino Paichadze, Abdul Bachani and Olive Kobusingye

Drs. Nino Paichadze, Abdul Bachani and Olive Kobusingye

Recently, Johns Hopkins International Injury Research Unit (JH-IIRU) faculty and staff, including Drs. Abdul Bachani, Amber Mehmood and Isaac Botchey, traveled to Munyonyo, Uganda to attend a symposium and injury forum.

On April 25, 2017, the team attended a National Symposium on Emergency Medical Services (EMS). The objectives of the symposium were to: review the status of EMS in Uganda; clarify the roles of the various sectors and agencies in the EMS; make recommendations on how EMS in Uganda can be organized; and identify challenges to the delivery of care. Dr. Amber Mehmood presented a paper on a comprehensive EMS assessment in Kampala, Uganda. Presenting on different prehospital care models, Dr. Mehmood recommended to adopt a health systems approach for improving prehospital care. 165 people attended the symposium.

Dr. Mehmood presents a paper

Dr. Amber Mehmood presents a paper on EMS models

On April 26, 2017, faculty and staff attended the 3rd National Uganda Injury Forum. The theme of the forum was “Mainstreaming injury prevention and control within and across sectors.” The objectives of the forum were to: describe the work of various sectors in addressing road traffic injuries, gender based violence and occupational injuries; explore the opportunities for working together; and propose practical ways of working across sectors. At the forum, Dr. Abdul Bachani chaired a session on multi-sectoral response to road traffic injury. Nearly 200 people attended the one-day forum.

The forum and symposium were both organized by the Johns Hopkins University-Makerere University Chronic Consequences of Trauma, Injury and Disability (JHU-MU Chronic TRIAD) program, funded by the Fogarty International Center of the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Read more about the Chronic TRIAD program here.

Group photo

Drs. Abdulgafoor Bachani, Olive Kobusingye and Amber Mehmood with fellows of JHU-MU Chronic-TRIAD program

The Johns Hopkins University-Makerere University Chronic Consequences of Trauma, Injuries and Disability in Uganda (JHU-MU Chronic TRIAD), is funded by the Fogarty International Center of the National Institutes of Health. Coordinated by the Johns Hopkins International Injury Research Unit (JH-IIRU) in the Department of International Health at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, the JHU-MU Chronic TRIAD supports four cohorts of long-term trainees.

In February, five fellows from our third cohort successfully defended their TRIAD-related dissertations and graduated from the program.

The JHU-MU Chronic TRIAD program aims to strengthen research capacity on the long-term health and economic consequences of trauma, injuries and disability across the lifespan in Uganda through an innovative model of sustainable capacity development.

The program is based on the close partnership between Johns Hopkins and Makerere University School of Public Health, two academic institutions with a strong commitment to understanding the long-term impact of trauma and injuries, experience in research, and a history of collaborative work.

Learn more about the program here.

Below are the fellows and their dissertation titles: 

  Chronic TRIAD Jennifer
 
Jennifer Namagembe successfully defended her dissertation, “Assessment of the nature of pre-hospital care provided to road traffic injury patients reporting to Mulago Hospital.”
 
  Chronic TRIAD fellow Claire
 
Claire Biribawa successfully defended her dissertation, “Alcohol intoxication among bodaboda drivers, related injuries and health costs at Mulago National Hospital.” 
 
 Chronic TRIAD Fellow Phoebe

Phoebe Alitubeera, a fellow from our supplementary training program on the intersection between Trauma/Disability and HIV in Uganda (JHU-MU supplementary grant), successfully defended her dissertation, “Utilization of post exposure prophylaxis among health workers following percutaneous injuries in public health facilities in Kampala Capital City.”

  Chronic TRIAD Arthur

Arthur Kiconco successfully defended his dissertation, “Determinants of occupational injuries among building construction workers in Kampala City, Uganda.” 

  Chronic TRIAD Lillian

Lilian Kauma, a fellow from our supplementary training program on the intersection between Trauma/Disability and HIV in Uganda (JHU-MU supplementary grant), successfully defended her dissertation, “HIV-related disabilities and utilization of rehabilitation services by people living with HIV receiving care at the Mulago Immune Suppresive Syndrome Clinic, Kampala, Uganda.” 

©, Johns Hopkins University. All rights reserved.
Web policies, 615 N. Wolfe Street, Baltimore, MD 21205