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Johns Hopkins International Injury Research Unit

A World Health Organization Collaborating Center for Injuries, Violence and Accident Prevention

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Keyword: childhood injuries

More than three out of 10 injury-related hospital admissions in Oman were children under 15 years of age, according to a new study from researchers at the Johns Hopkins International Injury Research Unit.

Study findings came from data from Oman’s Khoula and Nizwa Hospitals—and looked at injury characteristics, such as external cause of injury, place of injury, care at scene, and injury severity score.

Published November 12 in BMJ Paediatrics Open, the paper was led by JH-IIRU Associate Director Amber Mehmood.

“Through this research, we’ve found that an alarming number of injuries were of vulnerable populations, such as children under 15 years old,” said Mehmood. “These injuries—coming from falls, home injuries, and burns—comprise totals that highlight the need for age-targeted interventions and injury control programs.”

To review the epidemiology and risk factors for childhood injuries, the team assessed data from November 2014 and April 2015 of patients with a diagnosis of injury and trauma admitted to the hospital, as well as those who had trauma team activation in the emergency department.

Out of more than 2,600 cases, nearly 800 were of children, ages 15 and younger. The evaluation found that more than one-third were children 1-5 years of age. Two-thirds of all cases were males. More than half of all the cases were from transport injuries and the most common anatomical injury among all children brought into the hospital were head injuries. It was also found that children with head, face and neck injuries had higher odds of undergoing surgical treatment.

“Childhood injuries in Oman: retrospective review of a multicentre trauma registry data” was written by Amber Mehmood, Priyanka Agrawal, Katharine A Allen, Ammar Al-Kashmiri, Ali Al-Busaidi, and Adnan Ali Hyder.

The research was supported by The Research Council of Oman through grant #TRC/SRG/RS/13/003.

To read the full paper via open access, please click here.

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), unintentional injuries, particularly road traffic injuries, drowning and fire-related burns are among the leading causes of death for children 1-19 years. This translates into more than 2000 child deaths each day as the result of an unintentional injury.

Despite these shocking numbers, child injuries have not received much attention in the public health community. In fact, to date, few studies have examined exclusively the global child injuries of all age groups and even fewer have provided evidence-based solutions for tackling this burden.

The Johns Hopkins International Injury Research Unit (JH-IIRU) is committed to reducing the global burden of childhood unintentional injuries. From our assessment of the potential of child injury prevention in "Saving 1000 children a day: The potential of child and adolescent injury prevention"(accessed here) to our Global Road Safety Program work in low- and middle-income countries that focuses on interventions like seatbelts and child restraints, JH-IIRU is dedicated to using reliable data to assess risks and introduce effective interventions. We have analyzed hospital data on pediatric burn injuries in South Africa, examined child road safety education programs in Malaysia and done extensive home injury risk assessment work in Pakistan.

On February 27th, the Unit will announce an important new project in Bangladesh that will once again focus on reducing the number of childhood fatalities in that country. We'll have more information available here in the coming days.

Until then, follow these links to access information on the unit's extensive work in preventing childhood unintentional injuries:

http://ajph.aphapublications.org/doi/abs/10.2105/AJPH.2013.301607?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub%3dpubmed&

http://adc.bmj.com/content/99/1/62.long

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3709307/

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0020138312005566

http://qhr.sagepub.com/content/22/11/1476.long

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22710788

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/15389588.2011.645382?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub%3dpubmed#.UwttpmJdXh4

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3337295/

On March 16, 2013, JH-IIRU director, Adnan Hyder, staff member Siran He and associated faculty, Courtland Robinson, attended the Third Annual Emergency Medicine Conference (AEMC) held at the Aga Khan University (AKU).  With approximately 300 medical professionals from around the world attending, the conference focused on emergency care for children in a country where a staggering one in 10 children die before the age of five.

Dr. Adnan Hyder presented “Why is Emergency Care for Children NOT on the Global Health Agenda?” during the opening plenary session, along with a presentation by Dr. Junaid Razzak, chair and associate professor at the AKU Department of Emergency Medicine (AKU-DEM) and longtime JH-IIRU collaborator. Dr. Razzak noted that one out of every four patients in emergency rooms is a child.

Dr. Courtland Robinson, who is the associate director of the Center for Refugee and Disaster Studies at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, chaired a session on injury prevention in public health, as well as participated in a plenary session on disaster preparedness.

The conference, ‘Emergency Care for Children,’ was jointly organized by the AKU-DEM and Johns Hopkins University-Pakistan Fogarty International Collaborative Trauma and Injury Research Training Program.  

AEMC group
Left to Right: Dr. Courtland Robinson, Siran He, Dr. Adnan Hyder

Hyder Razzak panel
Dr. Junaid Razzak (far left) and Dr. Adnan Hyder during a panel discussion.

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