Skip Navigation

Johns Hopkins International Injury Research Unit

A World Health Organization Collaborating Center for Injuries, Violence and Accident Prevention

Bookmark and Share

News

On Wednesday, November 28, Johns Hopkins International Injury Research Unit team members participated in a parallel session panel at the 15th International Conference on Urban Health in Kampala, Uganda.

Titled “Health systems for all: responding to the increasing burden of disability and its consequences,” the panel was chaired by JH-IIRU Director Dr. Abdul Bachani and featured additional presentations including a session by JH-IIRU’s Nukhba Zia.

In addition to chairing the panel, Dr. Bachani kicked off the event with a presentation of his own, on strategies to address disability from a global perspective. He then introduced Medi Ssengooba, a disability activist and lawyer, who took the podium and spoke about experience living with disability in an urban setting.

Zia, a PhD candidate at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, then presented on measurement approaches and understanding the burden and consequences of disability. Uganda Ministry of Health’s Dr. Stanley Bubikire wrapped up the panel with his presentation on addressing disability in Uganda.

The conference, organized by the International Society for Urban Health, runs through Friday, November 30. The theme for this year’s event is “Managing Urbanization for Health: A Priority for All Nations” and focuses on six critical sub-themes to be addressed: 1) the governance of complex systems; 2) culture and inclusivity; 3) disasters, epidemics, and the unexpected; 4) cities as economic engines; 5) safety, security, and justice; and 6) spiritual health in the city.

To learn more about the conference, click here.

alt

JH-IIRU Director Dr. Abdul Bachani takes the podium to present during the conference's panel in Kampala, Uganda.

On November 14, Johns Hopkins International Injury Research Unit Research Associate Priyanka Agrwawl, MPH, presented work on interpersonal stranger violence faced by American Muslims at the 2018 American Public Health Association in San Diego, California.

The presentation, entitled "Interpersonal stranger violence and American Muslims: An exploratory study of lived experiences," featured work by JH-IIRU's Agrawal and founding director Adnan Hyder from the past year. In her work, Agrawal explored the interpersonal stranger violence faced by American Muslims in the Maryland area, as well as coping strategies and future recommendations to deal with such violence.

Information generated from the research-- funded through the Bloomberg Initiative-- can be used to make need-based, culturally appropriate recommendations on interventions and programs to improve health and well-being of American Muslims in the United States.

alt

JH-IIRU Research Associate Priyanka Agrawal and Yousra Yusuf at APHA 2018 in San Diego, California.

More than three out of 10 injury-related hospital admissions in Oman were children under 15 years of age, according to a new study from researchers at the Johns Hopkins International Injury Research Unit.

Study findings came from data from Oman’s Khoula and Nizwa Hospitals—and looked at injury characteristics, such as external cause of injury, place of injury, care at scene, and injury severity score.

Published November 12 in BMJ Paediatrics Open, the paper was led by JH-IIRU Associate Director Amber Mehmood.

“Through this research, we’ve found that an alarming number of injuries were of vulnerable populations, such as children under 15 years old,” said Mehmood. “These injuries—coming from falls, home injuries, and burns—comprise totals that highlight the need for age-targeted interventions and injury control programs.”

To review the epidemiology and risk factors for childhood injuries, the team assessed data from November 2014 and April 2015 of patients with a diagnosis of injury and trauma admitted to the hospital, as well as those who had trauma team activation in the emergency department.

Out of more than 2,600 cases, nearly 800 were of children, ages 15 and younger. The evaluation found that more than one-third were children 1-5 years of age. Two-thirds of all cases were males. More than half of all the cases were from transport injuries and the most common anatomical injury among all children brought into the hospital were head injuries. It was also found that children with head, face and neck injuries had higher odds of undergoing surgical treatment.

“Childhood injuries in Oman: retrospective review of a multicentre trauma registry data” was written by Amber Mehmood, Priyanka Agrawal, Katharine A Allen, Ammar Al-Kashmiri, Ali Al-Busaidi, and Adnan Ali Hyder.

The research was supported by The Research Council of Oman through grant #TRC/SRG/RS/13/003.

To read the full paper via open access, please click here.

Beginning on November 5, 2018—leadership, faculty, and staff from the Johns Hopkins International Injury Research Unit shared work, engaged with researchers from around the world, and advanced the field of injury prevention at the 13th World Conference on Injury Prevention and Safety Promotion (Safety 2018) in Bangkok, Thailand.

The conference, which ran through November 7, is a biannual gathering of students, researchers, and organizations across focus areas within injury prevention. Over the event’s three days, JH-IIRU team members presented research through poster and oral presentations, participated in organizational meetings, and staffed a booth in the exhibition hall.

Director Dr. Abdul Bachani led the Unit with presentations, such as his State of the Art session on evaluating multi-sectoral actions.” Dr. Bachani also presented a parallel session on home injuries among children in Malaysia, and facilitated a panel on injury-related disability.

“The Safety 2018 conference is a unique opportunity for our team to share work and interact with so many colleagues and collaborators from around the world,” said Dr. Bachani. “Having the Unit so well represented for this year’s event is a testament to the quality of work we conduct. I’m proud of the team and our research and look forward to connecting with others so passionate about advancing the field of injury prevention.”

Associate directors Dr. Amber Mehmood and Dr. Olakunle Alonge each presented at the podium on childhood injury mortality in Bangladesh and mHealth applications for injury surveillance and control, respectively.

Prior to the start of the conference, Dr. Bachani and Associate Director Qingfeng Li participated in a series of meetings, which included presentations on child injury and drowning prevention.

The conference officially kicked off on November 5 with an opening ceremony, featuring Princess Maha Chakri Sirindhorn.

Staff from JH-IIRU represent the Unit in the exhibition hall at booth No. 1 and all conference participants were encouraged to visit for information on online courses, professional opportunities, and more.

To learn more about Safety 2018, please visit the conference web page here. For all the updates from the JH-IIRU team, follow the Unit on Twitter at @HopkinsINJURIES for presentation highlights and conference updates.

alt

On October 10-12, 2018, Johns Hopkins International Injury Research Unit team members participated in a series of meetings at the Bloomberg Initiative for Global Road Safety (BIGRS) Partners Meeting, held at Bloomberg’s headquarters in New York City.

The gathering invited partners of the BIGRS consortium to connect and hear from one another on project updates and research and intervention highlights from around the world. Partners—including Vital Strategies, Global Road Safety Partnership, World Bank, and World Health Organization—joined together with JH-IIRU for the three-day event.

Michal Bloomberg, former mayor of New York City and founder of Bloomberg Philanthropies offered welcoming remarks on Wednesday, October 10, before introductions from Bloomberg Philanthropies’ Kelly Henning and Kelly Larson and brief highlights from local city officials who shared success stories as results of the consortium work.

JH-IIRU Director Dr. Abdul Bachani then took the podium to provide a status report on seven rounds of observational studies that he and his team led across the 10 BIGRS cities: Fortaleza and Sao Paulo, Brazil; Bogota, Colombia; Bandung, Indonesia; Bangkok, Thailand; Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam; Addis Ababa, Ethopia; Accra, Ghana; Mumbai, India; and Shanghai, China.

“The work conducted by our team during this second phase of the Bloomberg Initiative for Global Road Safety program has generated such positive results across a number of risk factors,” said Dr. Bachani. “To present our work alongside partners from the consortium who are on the ground implementing these interventions, it’s a real opportunity for continued in the field of road safety.”

Later in the week, Dr. Bachani joined Global Road Safety Partnership program manager Judy Fleiter for a presentation on the Global Road Safety Leadership Course. Through five offerings, the course has certified more than 300 participants from 50 different countries. It was also announced during the presentation that the next regional offering will take place in Buenos Aires, Argentina in the spring of 2019.

alt

Johns Hopkins International Injury Research Unit team members join alongside Bloomberg Philanthropies officials and BIGRS consortium partners.

©, Johns Hopkins University. All rights reserved.
Web policies, 615 N. Wolfe Street, Baltimore, MD 21205