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Request for Proposals

The Equity Working Group of the Bloomberg American Health Initiative invites proposals for seed grants to support teams of Johns Hopkins researchers to begin or expand interdisciplinary research projects related to designing healthy communities. The deadline for proposals is January 15, 2018.

The seed grant program will provide up to $10,000 for pilot projects which will develop, implement, and promote sustainable, resilient and equitable communities.

Proposals must be led by a fulltime faculty member, research scientist, or research scholar affiliated with the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. This affiliation does not need to be a primary appointment, and other collaborators (coPIs) may be from any Johns Hopkins division. Collaborators can include faculty, staff, and doctoral students in any division of Johns Hopkins University. Staff of government agencies and nonprofit organizations may also collaborate in seed grant proposals.

For more information about the seed grant program, criteria, and proposal requirements, click here

 

Research

The Hopkins Center to Eliminate Cardiovascular Health Disparities is conducting three primary research studies as part of its initial five-year award.

The RICH LIFE Project (2015-Present)

The RICH LIFE (Reducing Inequities in Care of Hypertension: Lifestyle Improvement for Everyone) Project is a pragmatic cluster randomized trial in which we will compare the effectiveness of clinic-based standard of care plus audit, feedback and education (SCP) to an intervention that uses a collaborative care team, a community health worker and specialist consultation to deliver contextualized, appropriately stepped care (CC/stepped care) for reducing disparities in blood pressure control and improving patient activation among patients with hypertension. The study uses patient and broad stakeholder engagement and applies principles of community-based participatory research to refine and adapt intervention protocols and materials to the needs of participating organizations, clinic sites, and populations. Thirty primary care clinics, including federally qualified health centers, across Maryland and Pennsylvania are recruiting 63 patients each (total=1,890).

Eligible patients are 18 years of age or older; are non-Hispanic black, non-Hispanic white, or Hispanic; receive care at participating clinics; and have uncontrolled hypertension with or without comorbidities such as diabetes, heart disease, or depression.

The proposed intervention, if effective, will have potential for sustainability and scalability in real-world primary care practices—especially among safety-net health centers—due to its inclusion of stakeholders at all phases of the project.

  • Design: Pragmatic cluster randomized trial in which we will compare the effectiveness of clinic-based standard of care plus audit, feedback and education (SCP) to an intervention that uses a collaborative care team, a community health worker, and specialist consultation to deliver contextualized, appropriately stepped care (CC/stepped care) for reducing disparities in blood pressure control and improving patient activation among patients with hypertension. The study uses patient and broad stakeholder engagement and applies principles of community-based participatory research to refine and adapt intervention protocols and materials to the needs of participating organizations, clinic sites, and populations. 
  • Settings: Thirty primary care clinics, including federally qualified health centers, across Maryland and Pennsylvania are recruiting 63 patients each (total=1,890) Eligible patients are 18 years of age or older; are non-Hispanic black, non-Hispanic white, or Hispanic; receive care at participating clinics; and have uncontrolled hypertension with or without comorbidities such as diabetes, heart disease, or depression. 
  • Interventions: Potential for sustainability and scalability in real-world primary care practices -- especially among safety-net health centers - due to inclusion of stakeholders at all phases of the project. 

Project ReDCHiP (Reducing Disparities and Controlling Hypertension in Primary Care) (2010- 2015)

  • Design: Pragmatic trial to study health-system and clinic-level factors that affect implementation, quality improvement and reduction in disparities
  • Settings: Six (6) community-based practices in Baltimore, Maryland
  • Interventions:
    • Blood pressure (BP) measurement training for clinicians and staff
    • Patient care management targeting dietary strategies and medication adherence
    • Clinician education using health information technology to deliver audit/feedback and patient-centered communication skills training
    • Outcomes: implementation rates, guideline-concordant care, racial disparities in blood pressure control, sustainability

The Achieving Blood Pressure Control Together (ACT) Study (2010- 2015)

  • Design: Randomized controlled trial
  • Study participants: 265 African-American patients with uncontrolled hypertension
  • Setting: Urban community primary care practice
  • Interventions:
    • Hypertension self-management and problem solving training for patients
    • Training in shared decision-making for patients and their family members
    • Community health worker support
  • Outcomes: Blood pressure control at one year, costs, sustainability

Five, Plus Nuts and Beans Study (2010- 2015)

  • Design: Three-arm randomized trial of:
    • Printed Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet advice (only)
    • Dietitian-delivered DASH advice tailored to neighborhood
    • Written DASH advice plus a dietary supplement containing potassium, magnesium, vitamins C and D, and fish oil
  • Participants/Setting: 180 African-American adults with controlled hypertension on medications, seen in community practices
  • Outcomes: Change in 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure at 8 weeks, glucose, insulin, uric acid, costs
 
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