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Welcome

The Johns Hopkins Center for Health Equity (formerly the Johns Hopkins Center to Eliminate Cardiovascular Health Disparities) was established in 2010 as a partnership of the Johns Hopins Schools of Medicine, Nursing, and Public Health. The Center's mission is to promote equity in health and healthcare for socially at-risk populations through advancing scientific knowledge, promoting sustainable changes in practice and policy, partnering with communities, raising public awareness of health inequities, and training scholars.

On this website, you will find the following:  information on how you can connect with us on social media; an area specially designed for community members to find resources; and a page dedicated to our published research among other resources and documents. I hope you find this a useful tool to improve you and your family’s overall health. Please use this site as often as you’d like and send us feedback at healthequity@jhmi.edu on how we can make this a more user-friendly place.

Sincerely,

Lisa A. Cooper, MD

Lisa A. Cooper, MD, MPH, FACP
Bloomberg Distinguished Professor & James F. Fries Professor of Medicine.
Center Director, The Johns Hopkins Center for Health Equity

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Highlights

  • The Johns Hopkins Center for Health Equity includes 30 faculty members and 28 current trainees from the Schools of Medicine, Nursing, and Public Health. We use transdisciplinary research collaborations to promote equity in health and healthcare for socially at-risk populations.
  • The Center uses community-based participatory research principles to build strong ties among researchers, healthcare provider networks, community members, and policy-makers. The Center includes NIH and PCORI-funded intervention studies to improve the identification, treatment, and outcomes of patients with cardiovascular disease risk factors, including hypertension, diabetes, and kidney disease; a Training Core; an internal Steering Committee; and a 50-member Community Advisory Board (representing patients, family members, faith and community-based organizations, neighborhood associations, historically black colleges and universities, practicing clinicians, and public health agencies).

 

 Cooper in Atrium

 

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