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Center for a Livable Future

 
Will Allen - Speaking at JHSPH
1:14:47
April 19, 2012
Will Allen - Speaking at JHSPH

1:14:47
April 19, 2012
Will Allen - Speaking at JHSPH
 
22:39
April 12, 2012
The title of Ms. LaDuke's talk is "Food Sovereignty, Biopiracy, and the Future." As part of her visit, she met with Center for a Livable Future staff, as well with members of the Johns Hopkins Center for American Indian Health. Information about her work on food sovereignty with the White Earth Land Recovery Project may be found on Native Harvest website. Presented by: The Center for a Livable Future and The Marc Steiner Show The Johns Hopkins School of Public Health
 
1:19:48
April 9, 2012
Session 6, February 21: Economics, Faith and Future. Before the Industrial Revolution, most people believed that they had little choice regarding what to do with their lives. They were "prisoners of circumstance," but the modern economic system has enabled people to imagine that things can be different. The glitch, of course, is that different peoples and cultures can imagine vastly different outcomes, so that one society comes to use its wealth to care for everyone, and another to increase the disparities between the rich and the poor. How can faith communities act as a check on the tendency to use the earth and its people for purposes other than the general good? Dr. Sylvia Nasar, Professor of Business Journalism at the Columbia School of Journalism and author of Grand Pursuit, and Dr. George Fisher, Emeritus Professor of Geology at Johns Hopkins University discuss these questions. In 2012, the Baltimore Food and Faith Project (BFFP) partnered with the Institute for Christian & Jewish Studies (ICJS) to host a six-part text study series: Enoughness: How Shall We Live on God's Earth? Participants had a unique opportunity to engage in an inter-religious and interdisciplinary discussion with clergy, lay leaders and visiting scholars on the texts of various traditions, as well as the fields of public health, science, economics, agriculture and policy, to address how we use (or don't use) the Earth. The focus of the series was on food production and land use, and explored questions about how we should treat the earth and each other. Enoughness followed on the text study series the BFFP and the ICJS co-hosted in 2010. That series, Food and Faith: Cultivating the Wisdom of Our Texts, presented an overview of current food production and distribution methods, and their relation to environmental stewardship, health and nutrition, social and economic justice and animal welfare. Clergy and lay leaders came together with public health experts, a healthy school food proponent and a food anthropologist to study the texts and to learn how these might apply to our food system today. Below are the videos of each of the text study sessions, along with the readings that accompanied each session.
 
4:51
March 29, 2012
Jesse Oak Taylor on Silent Spring, DDT, and Malaria
 
0:34
March 26, 2012
Love et al. 2012. Is the three-foot bicycle passing law working in Baltimore, Maryland? Accident Analysis and Prevention Center for a Livable Future - http://www.jhsph.edu/clf/ Bike Maryland - bikemd.org
 
4:14
March 12, 2012
Farm Biill Budget Visualizer http://www.jhsph.edu/clf/visualizer To learn about how the Farm Bill Budget Visualizer was created, please visit http://www.jhsph.edu/clf/programs/methods/
 
2:59
December 21, 2011
Farm Biill Budget Visualizer http://www.jhsph.edu/clf/visualizer To learn about how the Farm Bill Budget Visualizer was created, please visit http://www.jhsph.edu/clf/programs/methods/
 
1:02
November 10, 2011
How do you reconcile the ideas of food as a right and food as a commodity? Food as a commodity is not the problem. The problem is the way the food systems have developed, increasing the power of certain actors in the food system, who are in such a dominant position that they can impose on the producers very low prices for their crops and they can impose very high prices on the food they are buying. ... We need to reduce the gap between the farmgate price received by the producer, and the price that's paid by the consumer.
 
0:31
November 10, 2011
There is controversy about the Green Revolution. I think there is general agreement that at the time it was implemented, it was necessary to rapidly scale up food production to respond to increasing demand, but there's also an increasing consensus that things have gone wrong, and we've underestimated some of the negative impacts of the choices we've made.
 
1:48
November 10, 2011
What can the UN and other large bodies do in terms of educating farmers? We often think of teaching as something that is delivered top down... But agriculture is something very specific. It depends very much on the local environments, it depends on local traditions, it depends on a variety of conditions that farmers in specific areas have to encounter, and for this reason, horizontal spread of knowledge works better. Scientists have a role in facilitating this and in working with farmers ... We need to develop these horizontal systems of exchange of knowledge to move toward knowledge-intensive ways of producing food which are much less external input-intensive ...
 
3:20
November 10, 2011
Adam Smith said that free trade is excellent, but not for food. We should be aware that trade liberalization has two potentially very negative impacts that lead me to think, like many others, that it should be treated with great caution as a solution to hunger. First, trade usually benefits in countries who export on international markets benefits the larger producers and not the small-scale farmers. ... These small-scale farmers are the first ones impacted by the import of cheap food on their local markets, when they are least competitive... And the second reason why free trade is very difficult to see as a magic bullet is that countries who depend extensively on imports to meet their consumption needs, as are many low-income countries today, these countries are in a very fragile situation... These countries should not be fed—they should feed themselves, and we should help them by providing them the possibility to feed themselves. Trade indeed is desirable in many cases, but we must be aware of the very crucial function that food fulfills, not just as a means to feed populations, but as a source of revenue for small farmers and as a source of resilience for countries' food security.
 
1:26
November 10, 2011
What is it that you're suggesting when you talk about having a calendar of actions? We have to make a transition. How to do this? Well, we have to plan this in time, for example, the developed countries should plan getting rid of fossil energies in their food systems, because in the next few years this will be a necessity. This is why national strategies are important. Planning transitions is much easier and much less costly than to have to change at the last minute when the crisis erupts. ... The right to food means, interalia, that governments should adopt strategies based on a diagnosis of what needs the food systems serve and do not serve, to identify the actions to be taken. So put these actions in a sequence, plan their adoption on a calendar, identify the responsibilities of different branches of government, and set up a system by which the government shall be monitored for its success and achieving this transition.