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Johns Hopkins Alzheimer's Disease Resource Center for Minority Aging Research

Welcome Three New RCMAR Scientists

The JHAD-RCMAR is pleased to announce the selection of three new 2021-2022 Johns Hopkins University RCMAR Scientists. Each scientist received a Pilot Project Award in the amount of $30,000 for a one-year period. The three awardees are:

Bruce

Marino A. Bruce, PhD, MSRC, MDiv for his project entitled "Place, Faith and Cognitive Status among Middle and Old Age Black Men." The specific aims are to: 1) Determine urban-rural differences in the independent and interdependent associations of religiosity and spirituality on biological and behavioral responses to stress and cognitive status; and 2) Estimate structural equation models to examine the impact of place on the association of religiosity and spirituality with biological markers to elucidate how geography influence potential basic mechanisms through which they mediate the relationship between stress and cognitive status.

 

Wong

Roger Wong, PhD, MPH, MSW for his project entitled "Mediating and Moderating Effects of Modifiable Lifestyle Behaviors on Dementia Risk Among White and Hispanic Older Adults." The specific aims of the proposed study are to 1) To determine how modifiable lifestyle behaviors (physical activity, smoking, social contacts) mediate the relationship between race/ethnicity and dementia risk among White and Hispanic older adults, and 2) To determine how race/ethnicity moderates the relationship between modifiable lifestyle behaviors (physical activity, smoking, social contacts) and dementia risk among White and Hispanic older adults. 

 

Taylor

Harry Taylor PhD, MSW, MPH for his project ‚ÄúLongitudinal Trajectories of Social Isolation and Loneliness among Black Older Adults." The aim of the proposed study are therefore: 1) To determine longitudinal trends of social isolation and loneliness among Black older adults, and 2) To determine which sociodemographic factors influence longitudinal trends of social isolation and loneliness among Black older adults.