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Keyword: financing

By Chizoba Wonodi, IVAC Nigeria Country Director and WAVA National Convener.

In March we celebrate International Women’s Day, when the world recognizes the achievements and contributions of women of all colors, creeds and credentials. This spirit of empowerment resonates in Nigeria, where the Women Advocates for Vaccine Access (WAVA) are equipping members with small grants to conduct advocacy for sustainable immunization financing.

WAVA is a cross-sectoral coalition of women and women-focused civil society organizations. Members span the length and breadth of the six geo-political zones of Nigeria. While addressing a diverse range of developmental issues, WAVA members make a commitment to advocating for immunization access for all women and children. I’m honored to serve as their national convener.

The first-ever small grants contest was designed to encourage WAVA members to develop and carry out bold, new and exciting strategies to galvanize action, specifically for vaccine financing at all levels. If the plan could get people to listen to our cause and act on it, the idea was considered—even if it sounded crazy.

We could not have anticipated the spectacular array of creative proposals when we launched the small grants program, on the heels of our inaugural investiture ceremony for WAVA Vaccine Champions in December 2016. Ideas ranged from engaging youth in immunization financing discussions to hosting weekly radio shows on immunization.

To provide each proposal a fair review, we assembled a crack team of internal and external reviewers in Abuja and Baltimore. Over a six-week period, five Abuja and Baltimore-based internal reviewers poured through the pages, weighing the pros and cons of one idea against its ability to contribute to our mission. Proposals that scored 70% or higher in the initial review were then sent to at least two out of the three external reviewers.

A well-deserved shout-out goes to our able and excellent external reviewers, Hon. Usman Mohammed, WAVA Champion extraordinaire; Mr. Edwin Ikhuoria, advocate par excellence; and Dr. Francis Ohanyido, jack of all trades and master of all.

Out of sixteen submissions, seven made it to the final round. From this crop, the reviewers chose the top three entries based on their average scores and a qualitative agreement in ranking by both internal and external reviewers. In the end, there were only three winners and I believe the reviewers made the best choices.

To all that participated, know that I am proud of the efforts you put forth in this round. I hope that in the subsequent rounds we will see the same level of enthusiasm—or even higher. Be assured you will get constructive feedback from us that you can use to improve your proposal and grant writing skills for other opportunities. Our unflinching commitment to the growth and success of our members demands that we don't just say, “Sorry, better luck next time.” Rather we feel obligated to give a thoughtful review of the strengths and weaknesses of your submissions.

Our vision is that WAVA members become not only top notch advocates, but also successful and sustainable organizations. Nigeria continues to need our help to ensure vaccine access for women and children everywhere.

By Dr. Dagna Constenla and Samantha Clark

For many people throughout the world, the bite of a mosquito is nothing more than a common annoyance. But for individuals living in dengue endemic countries such an annoyance can quickly turn into a life threatening condition. Patients who get sick with dengue fever often experience excruciating headaches, skin rash, and debilitating muscle and joint pains. In severe cases, it can lead to circulatory failure, shock, coma, and death. Though early and effective treatment can ease symptoms, there is no specific cure available for dengue. Efforts to control dengue through preventing mosquito bites and breeding have proven to be largely ineffective due to the mosquito’s tendency to feed throughout the day and ability to breed in even small bits of stagnant water. 

Mosquito

The good news is a vaccine is forthcoming. After more than 60 years, the development of dengue vaccines has accelerated dramatically. Today, several vaccines are in various stages of advanced development, with clinical trials currently underway on five candidate vaccines. While it is difficult to predict the introduction date of a new dengue vaccine, it is expected that one will be available by 2017.

Unlike a new iteration of an existing vaccine, this is uncharted territory. Even if a dengue vaccine is successfully developed, a number of issues remain. How do we predict its use? Its costs? Its cost-effectiveness and affordability? How will countries introduce it?

Perhaps the greatest challenge facing countries will be how to finance the addition of a dengue vaccine to the national vaccine schedule. Vaccine price, availability of funding, and ability to negotiate pricing will all play a critical role in the ability of a country to finance a dengue vaccine. In the Americas, one of the regions where dengue is endemic, a key mechanism for introducing new vaccines has been PAHO’s Revolving Fund. This, along with other options such as pooled procurement, regional and domestic taxes, and low interest multilateral loans are all potential sources of funding.

These and other funding topics will be on the agenda at a workshop starting today and hosted by IVAC, a core partner in the Dengue Vaccine Initiative, in partnership with the International Vaccine Institute, the Sabin Vaccine Institute and the Pan-American Health Organization. The dengue finance workshop will bring together more than 30 experts from the Latin America and Caribbean region, including academics, representatives from bilateral organizations, international public health agencies, nonprofit organizations, international financial institutions, and government agencies. They will convene in Washington, D.C. on July 22-23, 2013 to discuss the challenge of vaccine finance in countries throughout the region.

This workshop will be critical to laying the groundwork for countries to establish a viable financing plan that can be immediately implemented following the introduction of a dengue vaccine. Stay tuned to the IVAC website for more information following the workshop.

 

Dagna Constenla, PhD, is the Director of Economics & Finance at IVAC. Samantha Clark is a Health Economist at IVAC.