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Global Mental Health

Courses

330.620.01 ISSUES IN MENTAL HEALTH RESEARCH IN DEVELOPING COUNTRIES
Mental Health - 2nd term (3 credits)

Introduces mental health as an integral part of global health research, including conducting needs assessments and intervention monitoring and evaluation. Presents and critiques strategies for integrating local cultural perspectives into research models. Examines methods of adapting psychiatric assessment tools for use cross-culturally and presents challenges for developing interventions for use in low-resource contexts. Encourages use of critical and creative thinking skills throughout to discuss the issues involved in this relatively new area of study.

224.694.01 MENTAL HEALTH INTERVENTION PROGRAMMING IN LOW AND MIDDLE INCOME COUNTRIES
International Health - 3rd term (3 credits)

Introduces students to mental illness symptoms and syndromes found across contexts and the variety of strategies used to treat such symptoms. Discusses mental health services as an integral part of global health program development. Addresses methods of adapting and developing interventions in low-resource countries and humanitarian contexts, as well as research designs used to evaluate these interventions. Challenges students to use critical and creative thinking skills throughout to discuss the issues involved in this relatively new field. Focuses on cross-cultural challenges in conducting mental health research in these settings. Topics covered include an overview of mental health issues in low-resource countries and humanitarian contexts; cross-cultural challenges; developing, modifying and disseminating prevention and intervention strategies; and the interplay between mental health and related topics such as nutrition, fitness and diabetes; HIV; substance abuse; and violence.

330.680.81 PROMOTING MENTAL HEALTH AND PREVENTING MENTAL DISORDERS IN LOW AND MIDDLE INCOME COUNTRIES
Mental Health - 4th term (3 credits)

Focuses on research and intervention approaches in low- and middle-income countries in the field of mental health prevention and promotion. Particularly emphasizes populations exposed to adversity, and challenges students to bridge the gap between research and practice in this area. Discusses the determinants of mental health, and how they can be targeted: at different life stages and different socio-ecological levels (e.g., family, school, and neighborhood). Addresses such questions as ‘What is resilience, and how can it be promoted?’, ‘How can interventions prevent depression in women exposed to intimate partner violence?', and ‘How do poverty, violence and malnutrition impact mental health?‘. Uses real-world examples, and follows a case method approach.

330.630.89 STIGMA AND MENTAL HEALTH: ISSUES AND INTERVENTIONS
Mental Health - Summer Institute (1 credit)

Provides a broad understanding of the interrelationship between stigma and mental health. Focuses on health consequences of stigma for individuals living with mental health disorders. Introduces students to intervention strategies for reducing mental health-related stigma at different health systems and ecological levels, with a focus on the role of mental health service users in stigma reduction. Prepares students to incorporate anti-stigma approaches into their own work.

330.681.89 MENTAL HEALTH AND PSYCHOSOCIAL NEEDS OF REFUGEES AFTER RESETTLEMENT IN HIGH INCOME COUNTRIES
Mental Health - Summer Institute (1 credit)

Provides a broad understanding of the refugee resettlement process and presents data on the epidemiology of mental health and psychosocial problems among refugees resettled in high income countries like the U.S. Introduces methods for measurement and evaluation of these problems and prepares students to be able to design mental health studies among this population. Explores mental health treatment options and service utilization among resettled refugees in high income countries.

330.658.89 MENTAL HEALTH AND PSYCHOSOCIAL SUPPORT IN INTERNATIONAL HUMANITARIAN SETTINGS
Mental Health - Summer Institute (2 credits)

Explores key issues in the development and evaluation of mental health and psychosocial support interventions with populations affected by humanitarian crises, such as natural disasters and armed conflicts. Discusses such questions as: ‘how do populations in diverse socio-cultural settings define mental health in the context of humanitarian crises?’; ‘How can we build on existing resources and practices that promote mental health in humanitarian crises?’; ‘What is known from epidemiological and intervention studies about common mental health problems and effective interventions in humanitarian settings?’. Challenges participants to reflect on translating science to practice, and vice versa. Course methods entail a mix of multimedia presentations and case discussions, focusing on real-world experiences.