Pneumonia & Diarrhea Progress Reports

2019 Pneumonia & Diarrhea Progress Report Card

The 10th annual Pneumonia & Diarrhea Progress Report Card from the International Vaccine Access Center highlights increases in immunization coverage—but a universal failure to meet targets across 23 countries with the greatest burden of disease

The Pneumonia and Diarrhea Progress Report, issued annually for a decade, finds as in past years that immunization coverage—the most frequently updated indicators in the report—generally makes up the highest scores. Use of exclusive breastfeeding continues to lag behind, as does access to treatment, particularly zinc supplements for diarrhea.

Access the full report and supplementary materials here

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2018: Pneumonia and Diarrhea Progress Report

A new report finds health systems are falling woefully short of ensuring the most vulnerable children have sufficient access to prevention and treatment services in 15 countries that account for 70% of global pneumonia and diarrhea deaths in children under five.

Globally, pneumonia and diarrhea together led to nearly one of every four deaths that occurred in children under five years of age in 2016. The 2018 Pneumonia & Diarrhea Progress Report—released ahead of the 10th annual World Pneumonia Day, on November 12, by the International Vaccine Access Center (IVAC) at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health—describes efforts to fight pneumonia and diarrhea in 15 countries with the greatest number of deaths from these illnesses.

Access the full report and supplementary materials here

Updated final report 12.28.18

Pneumonia and Diarrhea Progress Report 2018
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2017: Driving Progress through Equitable Investment and Action

IVAC’s eighth annual report marks our ongoing commitment to monitor country progress toward child health goals. As you will read in this year’s report, progress and opportunities for action align across several cross-cutting themes, including the need for: better methodologies and approaches to scale up interventions that work; bold vision and leadership that address cross-cutting challenges and put focus on the least advantaged; and continued partnership of countries and donors to ensure funds and evidence to support programs that prevent disease and promote health.

Read the full report and supplementary materials here:

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2016: PNEUMONIA AND DIARRHEA PROGRESS REPORT

The 2016 Pneumonia and Diarrhea Progress Report evaluates the annual progress implementing high impact interventions outlined in the Global Action Plan for the Prevention and Control of Pneumonia and Diarrhea (GAPPD), among the 15 countries with the greatest number of under-5 pneumonia and diarrhea deaths. 2015 marked the end of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), prompting us to examine the substantial progress made in implementing GAPPD interventions since the year 2000. The analysis highlights the need to accelerate uptake of select interventions for countries to reach both the 2025 GAPPD goals and the 2030 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Innovations in pneumonia and diarrhea disease management that may accelerate the pace of progress are discussed.

Read the 2016 Pneumonia and Diarrhea Progress Report here.

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2015: PNEUMONIA AND DIARRHEA PROGRESS REPORT

The 2015 Pneumonia and Diarrhea Progress Report evaluates the progress of the 15 countries with the greatest burden of under-five pneumonia and diarrhea deaths in implementing 10 high-impact interventions outlined in the Global Action Plan for the Prevention and Control of Pneumonia and Diarrhea (GAPPD), where data are available, and evaluates the need to accelerate the implementation of select interventions and assure sustainability of that progress.  The 10 interventions scored include vaccination, exclusive breastfeeding, access to care, and use of antibiotics, oral rehydration solution, and zinc to treat the illnesses.

Read the 2015 Pneumonia and Diarrhea Progress Report here.

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2014: PNEUMONIA AND DIARRHEA PROGRESS REPORT

Between 2000 and 2013, the global health community succeeded in decreasing the number of deaths due to pneumonia and diarrhea in children under the age of five years by 44% and 54%, respectively. However, reductions in annual child mortality rates for pneumonia and diarrhea, the leading killers of children under five, have continued to be only modest. The 15 countries with the greatest number of under-five child deaths from pneumonia and diarrhea in 2013 bore 71% of the global burden of child deaths from these two diseases in spite of accounting for only 56% of the world’s under five-year-old population. The 2014 Pneumonia and Diarrhea Progress Report evaluates the progress of these 15 highest-burden countries in implementing high-impact interventions outlined in the Global Action Plan for the Prevention and Control of Pneumonia and Diarrhea (GAPPD) relative to GAPPD coverage targets, where data are available.

Read the 2014 Pneumonia and Diarrhea Progress Report here.

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2013: PNEUMONIA AND DIARRHEA PROGRESS REPORT

In 2013, the Global Action Plan for the Prevention and Control of Pneumonia and Diarrhea (GAPPD) was developed and issued by the World Health Organization (WHO) and UNICEF, outlining key interventions that should be universally adopted, with the goal of ending preventable pneumonia and diarrhea mortality in children by 2025. GAPPD set forth coverage targets of 90% for vaccinations, 90% for access to pneumonia and diarrhea treatments, and 50% for exclusive breastfeeding of children during their first six months of life. The 2013 Pneumonia and Diarrhea Progress Report evaluates the 15 countries with the highest numbers of child deaths from pneumonia and diarrhea, based on UNICEF’s latest 2013 estimates, and reports on their progress in implementing GAPPD interventions with respect to coverage targets.

Read the 2013 Pneumonia and Diarrhea Progress Report here.

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2012: PNEUMONIA AND DIARRHEA PROGRESS REPORT

This Pneumonia Progress Report monitors coverage of the three GAPP interventions in the 15 countries with the highest absolute number of child pneumonia deaths in 2010.

The report reveals continued progress in some areas, along with setbacks and challenges. Nigeria, India, and the Democratic Republic of Congo continue to suffer from low vaccination coverage and high child mortality. Bangladesh and Tanzania, formerly 12th and 14th, respectively, in childhood pneumonia deaths, are no longer in the top 15 worldwide, having been replaced by Mali and the aggregated Sudan and South Sudan. Tanzania and Bangladesh remain high mortality countries, at 16th and 17th worldwide.

Read the 2012 Pneumonia and Diarrhea Progress Report here.

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2011: PNEUMONIA AND DIARRHEA PROGRESS REPORT

Pneumonia killed more children than any other disease in 2008, according to the World Health Organization (WHO). This report examines steps being taken to prevent this illness in the 15 countries with the highest pneumonia death toll among young children. Together, these countries account for approximately 75 percent of the global toll of child pneumonia.

The pages that follow reveal encouraging results, promising forecasts and some remaining challenges. Significant progress toward GAPP targets has been made this year in the area of vaccination. Within the last year alone, 10 of the 15 profiled countries have either introduced the newest-generation pneumococcal vaccines (PCV10 or PCV13), have been approved for introduction, or have applied to the GAVI Alliance for introduction support. This rate of new vaccine rollout in the developing world is unprecedented.

Read the 2011 Pneumonia and Diarrhea Progress Report here.