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Peter Winch, MD

  • Professor

Departmental Affiliations

Center & Institute Affiliations

Contact Information

615 N. Wolfe Street
Room E5533
Baltimore, Maryland 21205

410-955-9854
410-502-6733

Social and Behavioral Interventions Program
Johns Hopkins Alliance for a Healthier World
JHU undergraduate program in Public Health Studies

View Current Courses

Education

MPH, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, 1988
MD, Queen's University, 1985

Overview

I am Professor in the Social and Behavioral Interventions (SBI) Program in the Department of International Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. I have a longstanding commitment to training of public health professionals. I have been teaching since 1988, have served as academic advisor for over 100 graduate students, and teach courses on global health, qualitative and formative research, design of facility and community-based behavior change interventions for health and environmental sustainability, and applied medical anthropology. The main focus of my work is community engagement in health, behavior change interventions, and qualitative and formative research. My current areas of research include 1) Behavior change interventions for infectious diseases, environmental sustainability, and water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH); 2) Interventions for facility and community-based health care providers to improve quality of assessment, treatment and adherence to testing and treatment recommendations; 3) Implementation of facility and community-based maternal, newborn and child health interventions, maternal mental health; 4) Community and policy interventions to reduce greenhouse gases and criteria air pollutants; and 5) Youth opportunities, outdoor education and delinquency prevention.

I am co-chair of the university-wide Sustainability Leadership Council (SLC). The charge of the SLC is to provide advice and recommendations to the Provost on policies, programs, and other initiatives that will build a greater role for Johns Hopkins in teaching, research, and leadership on environmental sustainability, both locally and globally. It is also tasked with amplifying the University’s research and practice around environmental sustainability, through fostering academic collaboration and supporting the work of the Office of Sustainability. For more information, see https://sustainability.jhu.edu/about/sustainability-leadership-council/

Honors and Awards

The Dory Storms Child Survival Recognition Award, awarded by the CORE Group (www.coregroup.org), October 2011

Golden Apple Award for Teaching Excellence for online version of the course Introduction to International Health for academic year 2005-2006 (School of Public Health) and 2014-2015 (Krieger School of Arts and Sciences)

Advising, Mentoring and Teaching Recognition Award (AMTRA) for academic years 1992-1993, 1998-1999, 2003-2004, 2017-2018 Student Assembly, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

James H. Nakano Citation of the National Center for Infectious Diseases of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for outstanding paper published in 2002

  • Qualitative Research
  • Health Behavior Change
  • Environmental Sustainability
  • Water, Sanitation and Hygiene
  • Maternal and Child Health

My research is grouped into 5 topical areas: (1) Applied social science and vector-borne disease control - I have examined the application of social science theory and methods to the control of infectious diseases, especially vector-borne diseases such as malaria, dengue hemorrhagic fever and schistosomiasis. (2) Community health workers - I have a long-standing interest in community health workers (CHWs) as a strategy for delivering interventions to populations living far from health facilities. (3) Implementation of maternal, newborn and child health interventions - Building on Topic 1, I have examined the application of social science theory and methods to the design and evaluation of maternal and newborn health interventions. (4) Behavior change interventions for water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) - Building again on Topic 1, I have examined the application of social science theory and methods to the design and evaluation of interventions to promote WASH behaviors including handwashing with soap at key times, home water treatment, and latrine use. (5) Climate change adaptation - I am highly engaged in efforts to respond to climate change as a faculty member at Johns Hopkins University. I serve as Co-Coordinator of the MPH Concentration in Global Environmental Sustainability and Health, an academic track which offers a comprehensive set of courses on climate change, food security, energy policy and the built environment, and work closely with the JHU Energy, Environment, Sustainability and Health Institute (e2shi.jhu.edu).

  • Rothstein JD, Caulfield LE, Broaddus-Shea ET, Muschelli J, Gilman RH, Winch PJ. "The doctor said formula would help me": Health sector influences on use of infant formula in peri-urban Lima, Peru. Soc Sci Med. 2020 Jan;244:112324. doi: 10.1016/j.socscimed.2019.05.029.
  • Searle AR, Hurley EA, Doumbia SO, Winch PJ. "They Merely Prescribe and I Merely Swallow": Perceptions of Antenatal Pharmaceuticals and Nutritional Supplements Among Pregnant Women in Bamako, Mali. Matern Child Health J. 2020 Jan;24(1):110-120. doi: 10.1007/s10995-019-02808-2.
  • Yeasmin F, Rahman M, Luby SP, Das JB, Begum F, Saxton RE, Nizame FA, Hwang ST, Alam M, Hossain M, Yeasmin D, Unicomb L, Winch PJ. Landlords’ and compound managers’ role in improving and sustaining shared latrines in three Dhaka city slums. Water. 2020 July; 12(7):2073. doi: 10.3390/w12072073.
  • Zhang LX, Koroma F, Fofana ML, Barry AO, Diallo S, Lamilé Songbono J, Stokes-Walters R, Klemm RD, Nordhagen S, Winch PJ. Food Security in Artisanal Mining Communities: An Exploration of Rural Markets in Northern Guinea. Foods. 2020 Apr 10;9(4). doi: 10.3390/foods9040479.
  • Mishra D, Digidiki V, Winch PJ. The endings of journeys: A qualitative study of how Greece’s child protection system shapes unaccompanied migrant children’s futures. Children and youth services review. 2020 July; 116:105236. doi: 10.1016/j.childyouth.2020.105236; AND Mishra D, Spiegel PB, Digidiki VL, Winch PJ. Interpretation of vulnerability and cumulative disadvantage among unaccompanied adolescent migrants in Greece: A qualitative study. PLoS Med. 2020 Mar;17(3):e1003087. doi: 10.1371/journal.pmed.1003087