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Kristin M. Voegtline, PhD

  • Assistant Professor

Departmental Affiliations

Contact Information

200 N. Wolfe Street
Room 2076
Baltimore, Maryland 21287

410-614-3866

View Current Courses

Education

PhD, The Pennsylvania State University, 2010
MS, The Pennsylvania State University, 2007
BS, University of Wisconsin - Madison, 2004

Overview

My research interests lie in developmental psychobiology, with a focus on the organizing role of the maternal endocrine milieu on early human development spanning the prenatal to early childhood periods.  With receipt of a K99 award, I’m currently evaluating the prediction of self-regulation capacity and executive functions at age 5 by maternal hormones during pregnancy.  An upcoming study will extend this work to examine the functional significance of the hormonal transition associated with birth on infant reactivity and regulatory capacity, with a particular focus on the postnatal sex steroid surge observed in early infancy.

  • Fetal development
  • Infant development
  • Child development
  • Developmental psychobiology
  • Pregnancy
  • Temperament
  • Self regulation
  • Executive functions
  • Testosterone
  • Cortisol
  • Maternal-child interaction

Selected publications:

  • Voegtline, K.M. & Granger, D.A. (2014). Dispatches from the interface of salivary bioscience and neonatal research. Frontiers in Pediatric Endocrinology, 5, doi: 10.3389/fendo.2014.00025

  • Voegtline, K.M., DiPietro, J.A., Costigan, K.A., Kivlighan, K., & Henderson, J.L. (2013). Sex- specific effects of prenatal testosterone exposure on birth weight and weight gain in infancy.  Journal of Developmental Origins of Health and Disease, 4, 280-284.

  • Voegtline, K.M., Costigan, K.A., Kivlighan, K.T., Laudenslager, M.L., Henderson, J.L., & DiPietro, J.A. (2013). Concurrent levels of maternal salivary cortisol are unrelated to self-reported psychological measures in low-risk pregnant women. Archives of Women’s Mental Health,16, 101-108.

  • Ursache, A., Blair. C., Stifter, C.A., Voegtline, K.M., & the Family Life Project Investigators. (2013). Emotional reactivity and regulation in infancy interact to predict executive functioning in early childhood. Developmental Psychology, 49, 127-137.