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1619 to 2019:
Confronting the Legacy of Slavery for Health Equity in Baltimore and Across the United States

The Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health hosted a forum to examine the complex history of slavery and its impact on health equity in Baltimore, Maryland, and across the United States.

The event was co-hosted by the Center for Health Equity and Urban Health Institute at Johns Hopkins University; Office of Public Health Practice and Training and SOURCE at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health; and the Department of the History of Medicine at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. 

There were two panel discussions: The first focused on the historical legacy of slavery for health equity, and the second focused on Baltimore.

Archived webcast:

 

Panel #1:
Embodying the Health Legacies of Slavery

Panelists

  • Jessica Marie Johnson
    Assistant Professor
    Department of History
    Johns Hopkins University
  • Elizabeth O'Brien
    Assistant Professor of the History of Medicine
    Johns Hopkins School of Medicine
  • Deirde Cooper Owens
    Charles and Linda Wilson Professor in the History of Medicine
    University of Nebraska-Lincoln
  • Alexandre White
    Assistant Professor of Sociology and the History of Medicine
    Johns Hopkins University Krieger School of Arts and Sciences and Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

Moderator

  • Jeremy A. Greene
    William H. Welch Professor of Medicine and the History of Medicine
    Johns Hopkins School of Medicine

Panel #2:
Slavery and Health Equity in Baltimore

Panelists

  • Janice V. Bowie
    Professor
    Department of Health, Behavior, and Society
    Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health
  • Rev. Debra Hickman
    President/CEO, Sisters Together And Reaching, Inc (STAR)
  • Lawrence Jackson
    Bloomberg Distinguished Professor of English and History
    Johns Hopkins University
  • Bishop Douglas Miles
    Pastor, Koinonia Baptist Church
    Co-chairman, Baltimoreans United in Leadership (BUILD)
  • Karen Kruse Thomas
    Historian, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

Moderator

  • Lisa A. Cooper
    Bloomberg Distinguished Professor, Health Equity
    Johns Hopkins Schools of Medicine, Nursing, and Public Health