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Mental Health

Related Faculty

Leslie Adams, PhD
Assistant Professor
Dr. Adams’ research uses latent variable methods (e.g. factor analyses, latent class/profile analysis, etc.) to examine relationships between discrimination, psychiatric disorders, and health services utilization across sociodemographic groups. Dr. Adams also uses mixed methods and community-engaged study designs to explore mental health disparities in marginalized populations.

Sachini Bandara, PhD
Assistant Professor
Dr. Bandara’s research focuses on evaluating mental health and substance use policy. She applies causal inference methods using complex surveys and administrative data to evaluate policy outcomes. She also conducts policy communication research by designing public opinion polls, analyzing news media content and fielding  randomized survey experiments.

Joseph Gallo, MD, MPH
Professor
Dr. Gallo’s research focuses on mental health in community settings including primary care, with a focus on mixed methods, which utilize strengths of both anthropology and epidemiology.

Nicholas Ialongo, PhD
Professor
Dr. Ialongo’s research focuses on preventive interventions, particularly those carried out in schools.  Methodologically Dr. Ialongo has interests in the design and analysis of evaluations and in methods that help assess complex relationships over time, such as growth mixture models.

Renee M. Johnson, PhD
Associate Professor
Dr. Johnson uses existing data to answer new and emerging questions about adolescent substance use. Her current projects include integrating adolescent health surveillance data across states and cities to determine how macro-level factors (e.g., policy, population-level economic factors) shape risk for substance use. She also uses advanced LCA techniques to examine how drug policy is associated with polysubstance use across population subgroups.

Jeannie-Marie Leoutsakos, PhD
Associate Professor
Dr. Leoutsakos’ work focuses on latent variable methods and measurement challenges in mental health research (substantive areas of interest include dementia and substance use), as well as in the design and analysis of psychiatric clinical trials, including methods of randomization and sample enrichment.

Sabriya Linton, PhD
Assistant Professor
Dr. Linton’s research focuses on the measurement and identification of social and structural determinants of substance use and related sequelae. She applies multiple methodologies to this line of research, including geospatial methods, psychometrics, longitudinal and multilevel modeling, and qualitative methods.

Brion Maher, PhD
Professor
Dr. Maher is a geneticist with expertise in genetic and epigenetic data analyses measured using array-based and sequencing technologies. Dr. Maher’s research focuses on genetic and environmental contributions to psychiatric and substance use disorders, epigenetic consequences of substance use, and statistical methods to assess those associations.

Ramin Mojtabai, MD
Professor
Dr. Mojtabai's work focuses on mental health services research including analysis of complex survey data related to treatment for depression, other common mental and substance use disorders.

Sarah M. Murray, PhD
Assistant Professor
Dr. Murray's research focuses on using mixed-methods to understand the multifaceted relationship between violence, stigma, and common mental disorders to inform the development of effective strategies to promote the mental health and psychosocial well-being of women and children living in situations of complex adversity in high-, middle- and low-income country contexts.

Rashelle J. Musci, PhD
Assistant Professor
Dr. Musci is a developmental methodologist with methods expertise in latent variable modeling, randomized control trials, integrating biological data into longitudinal models, and statistical data harmonization techniques. Her substantive focus is on prevention science and adolescent mental health, including suicide, externalizing behaviors, and substance use.

Trang Q. Nguyen, PhD
Assistant Scientist
Dr. Nguyen's research focuses on causal inference using both observational and experimental data, with work on propensity score methods, missing data, measurement error and latent variables, mediation analysis, generalizability, and treatment effect heterogeneity. Broad application scope with focus on health and social justice: mental health, substance use, HIV, sexual and gender minority health and health disparities. More details can be found on Dr. Nguyen’s personal website.

Elizabeth A. Stuart, PhD
Professor
Dr. Stuart’s work focuses on the development of statistical methods for estimating causal effects and for handling data complexities such as missing data and multilevel data structures. This includes methods for non-experimental studies, as well as methods for designing and analyzing randomized experiments, as well as methods for combining the benefits of both types of studies to facilitate the generalization of randomized trial results to target populations.

Ryoko Susukida, PhD
Assistant Scientist
Dr. Susukida’s work focuses on evidence synthesis in mental and behavioral health research with method expertise in data harmonization and individual-level meta-analytic techniques. Her substantive areas of interest include treatments for substance use disorders and preventive interventions for suicide.

Johannes Thrul, PhD
Assistant Professor
Dr. Thrul's work focuses on mobile health (mHealth) research to study substance use behavior based on event-level data. He also uses technology, including smartphones, text messaging, and social media, to develop, test, and deliver evidence based cognitive behavioral interventions to prevent and treat substance use disorders.

Tiara C. Willie, PhD, MA
Assistant Professor
Dr. Willie’s research focuses on the distribution, determinants and health consequences of gender-based violence (e.g., intimate partner violence, reproductive coercion). Her research aims to inform, develop and evaluate trauma-informed interventions, practices and policies in order to reduce the social and health impacts of gender-based violence. Therefore, Dr. Willie’s research draws from both quantitative and qualitative methodologies such as latent variable modeling, causal inference, thematic analysis and grounded theory.