Dr. Krishna D. Rao, assistant professor, joined the Health Systems Program in 2014, bringing expertise in health systems and health economics. He received his master’s degree at Cornell University in agriculture and resource economics and his PhD in health systems from the Program.

Prior to joining the Health Systems Program, Dr. Rao worked with the Public Health Foundation of India (PHFI), where he conducted research on health systems and taught health economics. Before coming to PHFI, Dr. Rao worked in Afghanistan as part of the Johns Hopkins team supporting their Ministry of Public Health (MoH) to evaluate models of community financing of health services. Dr. Rao started his career in public health at the World Bank, working on the delivery of child nutrition and health services in India. In 2016, Dr. Rao was selected as a practitioner resident fellow to the Rockefeller Foundation Bellagio Center Residency Program.

Dr. Rao’s research focuses on three major areas – human resources for health, health financing and evaluation. He is particularly concerned with issues around strengthening primary care and nutrition services, measuring quality of care, and reducing financial hardship faced by households due to health care payments. He teaches courses in health financing in low- and middle-income countries, and the role of health in economic development. Dr. Rao also co-leads the Program’s health systems seminars.

Dr. Rao is involved with a variety of research projects. One of Dr. Rao’s key projects includes evaluation of a large-scale mentoring program for nurses at primary health centers in the state of Bihar, India. The mentoring program is funded by the Gates Foundation and provides nurses with the knowledge and skills to improve their obstetric skills. This evaluation is being conducted in partnership with the Johns Hopkins School of Nursing.

Dr. Rao is also currently working on designing a conditional cash-transfer program for improving nutrition in young children in India. The study uses a discrete choice experiment to understand the preferences of mothers for program conditionalities and cash transfer amounts. Other key projects include mentoring researchers from eight different countries to help them improve their research skills, conducting a cost-effectiveness analysis of a nutrition program in Malawi, and a previous health financing project in Kyrgyzstan that examined how health financing issues affect delivery of services.

Going forward, Dr. Rao is interested in studying conditional and unconditional cash transfer programs, aging and what implications that has for health systems and the financing of health care, and how the management and institutional structures of health services affect health worker performance and quality of care. Read more about Dr. Rao’s work in his faculty profile