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Health Policy and Management

Job-Seeking Doctoral Candidates Graduating May 2020

Danielle EdwardsDanielle Edwards
Doctoral Candidate in Bioethics and Health Policy
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(202) 253-9695
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Advisor: Jeffrey Kahn, PhD, MPH

Dissertation Committee Members: Mario Macis, PhD; Roni Neff, PhD

Dissertation Title: Factors Affecting Menu Development and the Effectiveness and Ethical Considerations of ‘Nudge’ Techniques Designed to Encouraging Meatless Eating in Rural Restaurants

Dissertation Executive Summary: High meat consumption can lead to numerous chronic health conditions. Furthermore, large scale meat production has negative public health implications such as infectious diseases, occupational hazards, and climate change. This research explores how restaurant stakeholders structure customer choices and their attitudes and beliefs regarding meatless menu offerings; it tests how menus affect whether consumers order a meatless option; and it analyzes ethical considerations of nudge interventions.

Job Type Preferences: Research, professorships opportunities, program management, and consultation in academic, private, non-government and community-based non-profits, or government-run organizations.

Geographical Preferences: Baltimore-Washington Metropolitan Area


Amelie HechtAmelie Hecht
Doctoral Candidate in Health and Public Policy
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Advisor: Keshia Pollack Porter, PhD

Dissertation Committee Members: Elizabeth Stuart, PhD; Roni Neff, PhD; Alyssa Moran, ScD

Dissertation Title: Universal Free School Meals: Implementation of the Community Eligibility Provision and Longitudinal Impacts on Student Nutrition, Behavior, and Academic Performance

Dissertation Executive Summary: The Community Eligibility Provision, a federal provision of the National School Lunch and Breakfast Programs that became available nationally in 2014, allows high-poverty schools to serve universal free meals. Amelie’s mixed methods dissertation explores systematic barriers to implementation of the Community Eligibility Provision, and its longitudinal impact on student nutrition, academic, and behavior outcomes.

Job Type Preferences: Research, professorship, and consultation opportunities in academic, non-government and community-based non profits, private organizations, or government-run organizations.


Jonathan LevinJonathan Levin
Doctoral Candidate in Health and Public Policy
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Advisor: Brendan Saloner, PhD

Dissertation Committee Members: Gerard Anderson, PhD; Caleb Alexander, MD; Matthew Eisenberg, PhD

Dissertation Title: State Strategies to Improve Use of Medications for Patients with Hepatitis C

Dissertation Executive Summary: Jonathan's research focuses on understanding how payers can influence supply and demand-side factors that can improve use of effective medications, particularly for high-cost drugs that are used to treat vulnerable populations. His dissertation evaluates how state-level provider screening mandates for hepatitis C impact initial and secondary medication adherence rates for hepatitis C patients.

Job Type Preferences: Research, research services and management, and consultation in academic, non-government and community-based non-profits, private organizations, or government-run organizations.

Geographic Preferences: New England, Mid-Atlantic, Baltimore-Washington Metropolitan Area, Eastern Midwest, and Pacific regions


Ariella MessingAriella Messing
Doctoral Candidate in Bioethics and Health Policy
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Advisor: Danielle German, PhD, MPH

Dissertation Committee Members: Joanne Rosen, JD; Katherine Clegg Smith, PhD; Carolyn Sufrin, MD, PhD

Dissertation Title: Hyde and Go Seek Funding: Grassroots Abortion Funds in the United States

Dissertation Executive Summary: Because insurance coverage of abortion is severely restricted, most people must pay for this expensive care out-of-pocket. Abortion funds are activist-run organizations that provide direct funding assistance and practical support to people seeking abortions. Abortion funds play an critical role in ensuring that abortion is accessible and not merely legal, but very little is known about their work. My dissertation is a qualitative study of grassroots abortion funds in the United States.

Job Type Preferences: Research and related positions, program management, or consultation opportunities at academic, government-run, or non-government and community-based non-profit organizations.

Geographical Preferences: Mid-Atlantic or Baltimore-Washington Metropolitan Area


Christian MoralesChristian Morales
Doctoral Candidate in Bioethics and Health Policy
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(347) 878-0488
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Advisor: Brendan Saloner, PhD; Nancy Kass, ScD

Dissertation Committee Members: John Jackson, ScD; Aditi Sen, PhDAdam Spira, PhD

Dissertation Title: Measuring Disability-Related Disparities in Access to Health Care: Empirical and Normative Challenges

Dissertation Executive Summary: For policy makers, counting is political. My dissertation explores different approaches to identifying people with disabilities and measuring health inequity. I start with a normative analysis of several challenges involved in the measurement of disability-related health disparities. I then characterize the populations identified by different disability-status measures and explore the implications of these differences for measuring disability-related disparities in access to health care.

Job Type Preferences: Research, research services and management, program management, and professorship opportunities in academic institutions, non-government and community-based non-profits, and government-run organizations.

Geographical Preferences: New England, Mid-Atlantic, Baltimore-Washington Metropolitan Area, Pacific, and International


Harlan PittellHarlan Pittell
Doctoral Candidate in Health Services Research and Policy
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Advisor: Matthew Eisenberg, PhD

Dissertation Committee Members: Jodi Segal, MD, MPH; Gerard Anderson, PhD; Hadi Kharrazi, MD, PhD; Antonio Trujillo, PhD

Dissertation Title: What Can We Learn from EHR Data? New Evidence on High Deductibles and Medication Adherence

Dissertation Executive Summary: My dissertation examines whether electronic health record (EHR) data is a relatively complete source of data as compared to insurance claims. It then uses EHR data to extend prior research on high deductibles and medication adherence. Results will offer needed evidence on the suitability of EHR data for research and other applications, and will also offer actionable information to policymakers and insurers looking to improve medication adherence among enrollees with high deductibles.

Job Type Preferences: Research, research services and management, professorship, and consultation opportunities in academic institutions, government-run organizations, and private organizations.

Geographical Preferences: New England and Mid-Atlantic regions


Zachary PredmoreZachary Predmore
Doctoral Candidate in Health Services Research and Policy

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Advisor: Albert Wu, PhD

Dissertation Committee Members: Jeremy Sugarman, MD, MPH; Aaron Tobian, MD, PhD; Christine Durand, MD

Dissertation Title: Barriers to HIV+ Organ Transplantation: The Role of Organ Procurement Organizations and Donor Hospitals

Dissertation Executive Summary: The HIV Organ Policy Equity Act permits recovering organs for transplant from HIV+ donors, and transplanting HIV+ organs into people living with HIV. While 500 HIV+ donors were expected per year, in the first three years there have been only 50 HIV+ donors. This dissertation explores the barriers to HIV+ organ donation using a mixed methods approach, consisting of a series of semi-structured interviews, a survey with a discrete choice experiment, and an analysis of administrative data.

Job Type Preferences: Research, professorship, and consultation opportunities in academic, non-government and community-based non-profits, and private organizations.


Farah YehiaFarah Yehia
Doctoral Candidate in Health Services Research and Policy
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+1 (443) 800-0323
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Advisor: Gerard Anderson, PhD

Dissertation Committee Members: Jodi Segal, MD, MPH; Laura Morlock, PhD; John McGready, PhD

Dissertation Title: Coverage Restrictions and the Effect of Cost Sharing on the Use of Orphan Drugs in Medicare

Dissertation Executive Summary: Farah Yehia is interested in examining ways to provide fair and affordable access to pharmaceutical drugs locally and globally. Her dissertation focuses on the Medicare population- an understudied group of rare disease patients- and aims to answer three questions: On what basis do insurance plans impose high coverage restrictions on orphan drugs? What factors promote or hinder generic competition for orphan drugs? And does the imposition of coverage restrictions affect the use of orphan drugs?

Job Type Preferences: Research, research services and management, program management, and consultation in academic, government, non-government and community-based non-profits, and private organizations.

Geographical Preferences: Open to positions in U.S., Europe, and MENA regions