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Health Policy and Management

Course Offerings

Week One, November 13-17, 2017

Climate Change Adaptation in Public Health: Large World Cities, 317.700.98

3 credits
November 13-15, 2017
Time: 830-1800 each day
Instructor: Dr. Mary Sheehan
Registration Fee: 420 Euros
JHU Academic Credit Tuition: $3273

Warmer temperatures, sea-level rise and more frequent and unpredictable severe storms brought by climate change pose major challenges for public health policy makers and practitioners. The policy challenge is to develop and implement strategies and programs to protect populations from a growing number of adverse health outcomes, including heat stress and heat stroke, injuries, and vector-borne disease. Students who are future public health policy and practice leaders will gain policy and practice tools that will help public health departments in the effort to adapt to climate change.

This course provides an overview of the science behind climate change and highlights the particular risks of global mega-cities due to their concentrated populations, urban heat-island effect, frequent proximity to coasts and rivers, and locus of transport and trade. The WHO and US CDC Guides to Vulnerability for Public Health and the UN Habitat Guide to Vulnerability Assessment for Cities will be used to identify populations at greatest risk from climate impacts. Critically evaluates through case studies actual climate and health adaptive policies as they are implemented in real-life contexts in several large, innovative world cities including San Francisco, London, Rio de Janeiro, Durban, and Copenhagen.

All students enrolled in this course are expected to complete required readings prior to the start of the course. Students will be evaluated for receipt of the certificate of participation based on class participation. Students taking this course for Johns Hopkins or UPF academic credit will be further evaluated based on a final paper proposal due December 1, 2017 and final paper due December 19, 2017.


A Built Environment for a Healthy and Sustainable Future, 188.682.98

3 credits
November 13-15, 2017
Time: 830 - 1800 each day
Instructors: Drs. Cindy Parker and Ana Novoa
Registration Fee: 420 Euros
JHU Academic Credit Tuition: $3273

This course is intended for anyone interested in learning about how the built environment affects our health and well-being. We will address some rural and agricultural land use issues but the majority of the course will focus on the urban built environment and transportation infrastructure. We will explore ways to change the urban built environment to contribute fewer greenhouse gases and also to adapt to a changing climate. With more than half of the global population now living in cities, this is a timely topic.

Addresses the role that the built environment plays in health. Specifically examines how building design, community planning and design, land use, and transportation networks contribute to energy use, water supply degradation, climate change, ecosystem degradation, and public health. Explores the contributions of suburban sprawl to adverse environmental and public health outcomes. Also examines how the built environment could and must change if we are to stabilize the climate and move into a sustainable future.

All students enrolled in this course are expected to complete required readings prior to the start of the course. Students will be evaluated for receipt of the certificate of participation based on class participation, small group work and group presentation. Students taking this course for Johns Hopkins or UPF academic credit will be further evaluated based on a final paper due no later than December 19, 2017.


Problem Solving in Public Health, 550.608.98

4 credits
November 14-17, 2017
Time: 830 -1800 each day
Instructors: Ms. Dana Sleicher and Dr. Cyrus Engineer
Registration Fee: 560 Euros
JHU Academic Credit Tuition: $4364
Note: enrollment in this course is limited to 45 students

This course serves as an integrated introduction to the field of public health, offering definitions of health and public health, a comparison of the fields of public health and medicine, and an introduction to a broad array of current public health issues. The main focus of the course is to help students develop an effective, coherent approach to solving public health problems. Public health work is rarely conducted in isolation: Students will work in teams to develop their skills in the use of a public health framework for addressing public health challenges—and opportunities.

The Problem Solving Framework used in the course contains a series of sequential steps: defining the problem; measuring its magnitude; understanding the key determinants; identifying and developing intervention and prevention strategies; setting priorities and recommending policies; implementing intervention strategies; and evaluating the interventions. Effective communication strategies are critical at all stages of the Problem Solving framework, and the human rights impact of each step is actively considered.

All students enrolled in this course are expected to complete required readings prior to the start of the course. Students will be evaluated for receipt of the certificate of participation based on class participation, small group work and group presentation. Students taking this course for Johns Hopkins or UPF academic credit will be further evaluated based on a final paper due no later then December 19, 2017.


Statistics for Research: Structural Models, 312.550.98

3 days
November 15-17, 2017
Time: 830-1800 each day
Instructors: Drs. Qian-Li Xue and Albert Espelt
Registration Fee: 420 Euros

This course will present quantitative approaches to theory construction in the context of multiple response variables, with models for both continuous and categorical data. Topics that will be covered over the three days include the statistical basis for causal inference; principles of path analysis; linear structural equation analysis incorporating measurement models; latent class regression; and analysis of panel data with observed and latent variable models. Examples from the social sciences, including the status attainment approach to intergenerational mobility, behavior genetics models of disease and environment, consumer satisfaction, functional impairment and disability, and quality of life will be presented. Students registered for this course are expected to have an advanced background in statistics or biostatistics.

All students enrolled in this course are expected to complete required readings prior to the start of the course. Students will be evaluated for receipt of the certificate of participation or UPF academic credit based on class participation and problem sets. This course is not available for Johns Hopkins academic credit.


Environmental Quality, Climate Change and Health: Current Issues in Policy, 318.864.98

2 credits
November 16-17, 2017
Time: 830-1800 each day
Instructors: Drs. Thomas Burke and Joan Ramon Villalbi
Registration Fee: 280 Euros
JHU Academic Credit Tuition: $2182

The focus of the course will be on policy issues in environmental quality, climate change, and health. A systems view will be presented demonstrating the interaction between environment and health, including the continuum from global level to the health of individuals. Central topics to be covered include an overview of the science on the public health impacts of climate, the challenges of mitigation and adaptation, and tools to assess health impacts. Real world case studies will be presented to illustrate current policy approaches and public health challenges.

This course provides policy researchers with a set of analytical frameworks to gain a greater understanding of policy issues. Explores all aspects of a topical policy issue from its origins, transformations, and impact on health and social justice. Policy topics are determined each year according to faculty interest, student need, and policy saliency. Uses case studies, policy analysis readings, and discussions to foster student learning. Some sessions focus directly on translating policy research into policy alternatives while others focus on the political and social environment.

All students enrolled in this course are expected to complete required readings prior to the start of the course. Students enrolled in this course will be evaluated for receipt of the certificate of participation based on class participation. Students taking this course for Johns Hopkins or UPF academic credit will be further evaluated by a final paper outline due December 1, 2017 and a final paper due no later than December 19, 2017.


Week Two, November 20-25, 2017

The Tools of Public Health Practice and Decision Making, 300.603.98

3 credits
November 20-22, 2017
Time: 830 -1800 each day
Instructors: Dr. Beth Resnick
Registration Fee: 420 Euros
JHU Academic Credit Tuition: $3273

This course will introduce the core functions of public health and the core competencies for public health professionals. Students will assess their strengths and academic goals while building their toolbox of public health competencies. Case studies will be used to present competencies and will include topics such as management and personnel decision making, cultural sensitivity, communicating with the media, outbreak and emergency response. Some elements of the public health problem solving approach will be presented and integrated into the case examples.

All students enrolled in this course are expected to complete required readings prior to the start of the course. Students enrolled in this course will be evaluated for receipt of the certificate of participation based on class participation and a social media exercise and assignment. Students taking this course for Johns Hopkins or UPF academic credit will be further evaluated by a take-home exam due no later than December 19, 2017.


The Political Economy of Social Inequalities and Its Consequences for Health and Quality of Life, 308.610.98

3 credits
November 20-22, 2017
Time: 830 -1800 each day
Instructor: Dr. Vicente Navarro
Registration Fee: 420 Euros
JHU Academic Credit Tuition: $3273

This course focuses on the economic, financial, political, and social causes for the growth of social inequalities, in both developed and underdeveloped countries, and its consequences for health and quality of life. A special emphasis is given to the analysis of public policies that have been developed by national and international agencies and how they have impacted the growth of those inequalities. The course also analyzes social class, race, and gender inequalities and their reproduction through national and international policies. The increasing concentration of power and the way it appears in health and vital statistics is emphasized. This course requires active participation of the students in the discussion of the issues involved.

All students enrolled in this course are expected to complete required readings prior to the start of the course. Students enrolled in this course will be evaluated for receipt of the certificate of participation based on active class participation, including position debates. Students taking this course for Johns Hopkins or UPF academic credit will be further evaluated by a final paper due no later than December 19, 2017.


SS/R: Risk Assessment and Food Production Practices, 317.860.98

2 credits
November 20-21, 2017
Time: 830 -1800 each day
Instructor: Drs. Keeve Nachman, Pere Balfagón, and Marta Villarroel Fandos
Registration Fee: 280 Euros
JHU Academic Credit Tuition: $2182

This course will focus on applying the environmental health risk assessment framework to examine food production practices and the associated public health risks and benefits. Discussions of animal and crop agriculture and food processing encompass both historical practices and modern methods, and the risks faced from the local to global levels. Lectures will present case studies which delve deeper into specific topics, including industrial food animal production, veterinary drugs and antibiotic resistance, agricultural policy, chemical exposures, rural communities and food animal worker health, and sustainable production methods. Lectures will draw from the literature and from firsthand experiences in research translation and science policy.

All students enrolled in this course are expected to complete required readings prior to the start of the course. Students enrolled in this course will be evaluated for receipt of the certificate of participation based on class participation and short in-class quizzes.  Students taking this course for Johns Hopkins or UPF academic credit will be further evaluated by a take-home final assignment due no later than December 19, 2017.


A Transdisciplinary Systems Approach to Addressing Social Determinants of Health Inequalities, 308.842.98

3 credits
November 23-25, 2017
Time: 830 -1800 each day
Instructor: Dr. Joan Benach
Registration Fee: 420 Euros
JHU Academic Credit Tuition: $3273

Although there is abundant literature on the analysis of SDHI, most research approaches are based on limited risk factor analyses and other reductionistic linear behavioral and biological perspectives. The advance of ‘complexity science’ and ‘systems thinking’ across a broad range of practices and tools (e.g., system dynamics, network analysis, and agent-based modeling) allows one to consider the causes and solutions for complex challenges such as obesity and addiction, which follow complex systems characteristics such as nonlinearity, feedback loops, or chaotic behavior.

This course introduces a novel transdisciplinary approach on Social Determinants of Health Inequities (SDHI). Provides an in-depth understanding of macro, meso and micro levels, all of which generate health inequities. Prepares students to examine the changes, causes, and potential policies to address systemic public health and equity-related subjects and the complex interactions between biology, behaviors, society and politics. Integrates a broad range of disciplines, ‘systems thinking’ practices, and methodological pluralism. Reviews research advances, including explanatory case studies and the evaluation of policies and interventions to reduce health inequities.

All students enrolled in this course are expected to complete required readings prior to the start of the course. Students enrolled in this course will be evaluated for receipt of the certificate of participation based on class participation and a group oral presentation. Students enrolled for academic credit will be further evaluated based on the submission of a final paper, due no later than December 19, 2017.


Week Three, November 27 - December 2,  2017

The Health Effects of Indoor and Outdoor Air Pollution, 183.641.98

3 credits
November 27-29, 2017
Time: 830 - 1800 each day
Instructors: Drs. Kristen Koehler, Natalia Valero and Ana Gomez Gutierrez
Registration Fee: 420 Euros
JHU Academic Credit Tuition: $3273

This course provides background on respiratory tract defense mechanism and the factors that control inhalation exposures to environmental pollutants and their influences on health and diseases. Topics that will be discussed include oxidant pollutants, sulfur dioxide and acid aerosols, particulates, bioaerosols, building-related illness, volatile organic compounds, environmental tobacco smoke and radon.  The course will also consider host susceptibility factors, risk assessment, the influence of global warming, and regulation and public policy.

All students enrolled in this course are expected to complete required readings prior to the start of the course. Students will be evaluated for receipt of the certificate of participation based on class participation, small group work and group presentation.  Students taking this course for Johns Hopkins or UPF academic credit will be further evaluated based on a final paper due no later than December 19, 2017.


Crisis Response in Public Health Practice: International Perspectives, 302.675.98

2 credits
November 27-28, 2017
Time: 830 -1800 each day
Instructor: Drs. Josh Sharfstein, Carme Borrell, and M. Isabel Pasarin Rua
Registration Fee: 280 Euros
JHU Academic Credit Tuition: $2182

Firefighters battle fires; police officers fight crime. Public health officials capture the public’s attention during crises, such as infectious disease outbreaks, panic over tainted food or other household products, weather-related disasters, and high profile disputes with regulated industries. This course brings the concept of crisis to center stage in order to prepare future and current public health officials for crisis. 

This course examines crises from the point of view of an agency leader responsible for designing and implementing an effective response while maintaining credibility and securing long-term policy change. Recent crises including the global response to Ebola and Zika, responses to regulatory failures, foodborne outbreaks, and vaccine controversies will be discussed. Students are provided an opportunity to apply their knowledge by proposing a crisis response plan for a public health agency.  Note, this is not a course in emergency preparedness or disaster planning.

All students enrolled in this course are expected to complete required readings prior to the start of the course. Students will be evaluated for receipt of the certificate of participation based on class participation, small group work and group presentation.  Students taking this course for Johns Hopkins or UPF academic credit will be further evaluated based on a final paper due no later than December 19, 2017.


Workshop: Public Health Crisis in Barcelona, 312.551.98

1 day
November 29, 2017
Time: 830 - 1800
Instructors: Drs. Carme Borrell, M. Isabel Pasarin Rua, and Josh Sharfstein
Registration Fee: 140 Euros

This workshop will work on developing a protocol to be used within the city of Barcelona to address public health crisis.  Components of the protocol would include a communication plan as well as steps to manage a crisis.  Special consideration will be made to discuss the implications of opening a new drug center, a crisis of an infectious disease, or a crisis related to air or water quality. 

Workshops are intended to be hands-on opportunities for public health professionals to examine a topic of particular interest or application to the city of Barcelona.  The workshops are open to those beyond employees and researchers of the Barcelona Public Health Agency, but no JHU or UPF academic credit will be available to participants.


Patient Safety and Medical Errors, 309.730.98

3 credits
November 29 - December 1, 2017
Time: 830-1800 each day
Instructor: Dr. Albert Wu
Registration Fee: 420 Euros
JHU Academic Credit Tuition: $3273

This course provides an introduction to the science of safety, and how it relates to problems with patient safety in health care. Explains the role of both individuals and systems in improving patient safety. Reviews institutional responses to adverse events, including the topics of risk management and medical malpractice. Emphasizes the importance of communication and teamwork. Students learn the basics of conducting an incident investigation, gain an understanding of the advantages and limitations of error reporting, learn how to disclose errors and adverse events, and learn models for improving safety in hospitals and other health care organizations from both the micro and macro points of view.

All students enrolled in this course are expected to complete required readings prior to the start of the course. Students enrolled in this course will be evaluated for receipt of the certificate of participation based on class participation. Students taking this course for Johns Hopkins or UPF academic credit will be further evaluated by a final paper outline due December 8, 2017 and a final paper that will analyze a patient-safety case study due no later than December 19, 2017.


Workshop: Evaluation of the Health Impact of Superblocks in Barcelona, 312.552.98

1 day
November 30, 2017
Time: 830 - 1800
Instructors: Drs. Catherine Perez, Maria Jose Lopez, and Keshia Pollack
Registration Fee: 140 Euros

The Superblock is a new model of mobility that restructures the typical urban road network. With its implementation, Superblocks provide solutions to the main problems of urban mobility and improves both the availability and quality of the public space for pedestrian traffic. To achieve these goals for mobility, two fundamental changes must be made: modification to the basic road network and the establishment of differentiated routes for each mode of transport. From 2017-2018 four superblocks will be implemented in Barcelona. The aim of the workshop would be to share and discuss the work done at ASPB to start the evaluation of health impacts of superblocks, and to develop new steps about the evaluation.

Workshops are intended to be hands-on opportunities for public health professionals to examine a topic of particular interest or application to the city of Barcelona.  The workshops are open to those beyond employees and researchers of the Barcelona Public Health Agency, but no JHU or UPF academic credit will be available to participants.


Workshop: Surveillance for Health Risk Assessment of Air Quality in Barcelona, 312.553.98

1 day
November 30, 2017
Time: 830 - 1800
Instructors: Drs. Gloria Perez, Ana Gomez Gutierrez, Sylvia Medina and Kristen Koehler
Registration Fee: 140 Euros

The workshop will explore different examples of surveillance systems used to monitor air pollution especially on a city level basis. Each system will be described in terms of data used both in the environmental exposure and the health outcome. The usefulness of different systems will be considered and also the strengths and weakness of each one.

The workshop will also provide a general overview of the principles used to conduct a health risk assessment (HRA) for air pollution.  We will discuss how to create clear messages to share results with policy-makers and the general public who do not necessarily have a technical background or expertise in the health impact of air.

Workshops are intended to be hands-on opportunities for public health professionals to examine a topic of particular interest or application to the city of Barcelona.  The workshops are open to those beyond employees and researchers of the Barcelona Public Health Agency, but no JHU or UPF academic credit will be available to participants. 


SS/R: Introduction to Health Impact Assessment, 305.846.98

2 credits
December 1-2, 2017
Time: 830-1800 each day
Instructor: Dr. Keshia Pollack
Registration Fee: 280 Euros
JHU Academic Credit Tuition: $2182

This course will Introduce students to health impact assessments (HIA), a systematic approach that informs decision-makers about the potential health impacts of proposed projects, programs, and policies that do not traditionally focus on health outcomes (e.g., education or housing), but are likely to affect the public’s health. Focuses on the application of HIA for policymaking, both in the U.S. and internationally. Students study the rationale for conducting HIAs, review a range of analytic methods used to conduct HIAs, analyze cases from international and domestic settings, and walk through the steps of how to conduct a HIA.

Note: This special studies is a subset of 305.684, Health Impact Assessment. This special studies will NOT meet the practicum hours requirement for JHU/MPH students.

All students enrolled in this course are expected to complete required readings prior to the start of the course. Students enrolled in this course will be evaluated for receipt of the certificate of participation based on class participation. Students taking this course for Johns Hopkins or UPF academic credit will be further evaluated by a HIA critique due to no later than December 11, 2017 and a final reflection paper due no later than December 19, 2017. 


Week Four, December 4-7, 2017

Implementation and Sustainability of Community-based Health Programs, 410.630.98

3 credits
December 4-6, 2017
Time: 830-1800 each day
Instructors: Drs. Janice Bowie, Elia Diez and Mr. Ferran Daban
Registration Fee: 420 Euros
JHU Academic Credit Tuition: $3273

This course uses current projects to illustrate and evaluate the program component delivery process and continuation or sustainability of activities and benefits of community-based disease prevention and health promotion programs after initial funding ends. The course will review  theories of innovation and organizational change; community participation and involvement; programmatic, cost-benefit, and ethical considerations related to the goal of sustainability; program characteristics associated with sustainability; and the relationships between investments in health and overall community development.

All students enrolled in this course are expected to complete required readings prior to the start of the course. Students enrolled in this course will be evaluated for receipt of the certificate of participation based on class participation and in-class exercises. Students taking this course for Johns Hopkins or UPF academic credit will be further evaluated by a final reflection paper due no later than December 19, 2017.


Workshop: Community-based Health Programs in Barcelona, 312.554.98

1 day
December 7, 2017
Time: 830 - 1800
Instructors: Drs. Elia Diez, Ferran Daban, and Janice Bowie
Registration Fee: 140 Euros

This workshop will discuss strategies for increased participation and community empowerment to improve health in some of Barcelona’s disadvantaged neighborhoods.  The workshop participants will discuss specifically issues on the prevention and management of conflict, including conflicts of interest, in the context of urban health and community health.  The workshop will also address messaging strategies to professionals and the communities within the city based on study results of the public Primary Care Centers of Barcelona.

Workshops are intended to be hands-on opportunities for public health professionals to examine a topic of particular interest or application to the city of Barcelona.  The workshops are open to those beyond employees and researchers of the Barcelona Public Health Agency, but no JHU or UPF academic credit will be available to participants.