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Course Catalog

380.755.81 Population Dynamics and Public Health

Department:
Population, Family and Reproductive Health
Term:
1st term
Credits:
2 credits
Academic Year:
2019 - 2020
Location:
Internet
Auditors Allowed:
No
Grading Restriction:
Letter Grade or Pass/Fail
Contact:
Mary Hughes
Course Instructors:
Resources:
Prerequisite:

Introduction to Online Learning is required prior to participating in any of the School's Internet-based courses. None

Description:

Public Health is a population science, and gaining an understanding of how trends and patterns of births, deaths and migrations determine the size, age-sex structure and location of populations is a critical foundation for all work in the other public health disciplines.

Provides an introduction to population dynamics, the processes by which populations change, as a foundation for understanding population health. Students learn how births, deaths, and migrations determine the size, growth, age-sex structure, and geographic location of populations. Students review the proximate and indirect causes of population change and assess their socioeconomic, environmental, and public health consequences. Students calculate and interpret basic measures used to describe populations and measure population dynamics, and learn the main sources of population data and their strengths and limitations.

Learning Objectives:

Upon successfully completing this course, students will be able to:

  1. Describe global and nation-specific trends in population size, age-sex structure, and geographic distribution
  2. Describe global and nation-specific trends in fertility and discuss the proximate determinants and most important indirect determinants of these trends
  3. Describe global and nation-specific trends in mortality and discuss some of the factors that explain mortality differentials among populations
  4. Explain how changes in fertility, mortality, and migration determine population growth and age-sex structure
  5. Summarize the interrelationships among economic development, population and health policies, and population dynamics
  6. Recognize the impact of population growth on the global environment
  7. Calculate and interpret the basic measures used to describe populations and measure population dynamics
  8. Identify selected sources of population data and describe their strengths and limitations
Methods of Assessment:

The grade in this course will be determined by the following: Six weekly online quizzes will count 12 points each - 72 points. Final examination - 28 points. Total - 100 points

Enrollment Restriction:

None

Instructor Consent:

No consent required