Skip Navigation

Course Catalog

340.721.60 Epidemiologic Inference in Public Health I

Department:
Epidemiology
Term:
1st term
Credits:
5 credits
Academic Year:
2016 - 2017
Location:
East Baltimore
Class Times:
  • M W,  10:30 - 11:20am
Lab Times:
  • Monday,  8:30 - 10:00am (01)
  • Monday,  8:30 - 10:00am (02)
  • Monday,  8:30 - 10:00am (03)
  • Wednesday,  8:30 - 10:00am (04)
  • Wednesday,  8:30 - 10:00am (05)
  • Wednesday,  8:30 - 10:00am (06)
Auditors Allowed:
No
Grading Restriction:
Letter Grade or Pass/Fail
Contact:
Allyn Arnold
Course Instructors:
Resources:
Prerequisite:

None

Description:

Introduces principles and methods of epidemiologic investigation of disease and other health states. Presents different types of study designs, including randomized trials, cohort and case-control studies; measurement of exposures and outcomes; risk estimation; surveillance; program evaluation; and causal inference. Links epidemiologic inferences with the development of policy. Activities provide experience in applying epidemiologic methods, interpreting findings, and drawing inferences.

Learning Objectives:

Upon successfully completing this course, students will be able to:

  1. Define epidemiology, describe how it is used in public health, and recognize how exposure, disease and health states may vary based on person, place and time
  2. Identify, calculate and interpret measures of disease frequency, validity and reliability, and associations (relative and absolute) as appropriate to the research question and study design
  3. Describe and compare and contrast the strengths and weaknesses (biases) of epidemiologic study designs, including ecologic, cross-sectional, case-control, cohort, and clinical trials
  4. Explain the role of epidemiologic methods and inferences in determining the etiology of disease and other health states (e.g., aging, injury, mental health) in preventing disease and improving health
  5. Summarize how epidemiologic methods and inferences are used in public health practice, including in conducting outbreak investigation and surveillance, evaluating screening programs and health interventions, and in developing health and environmental policy
Methods of Assessment:

Assignments 50%; Mid-term Examination 25%; Final Examination 25%

Instructor Consent:

No consent required

Special Comments:

This class blends traditional classroom time and outside-of-class activities with a corresponding reduction in class sessions. This class will meet 2 times per week. Students are expected to spend 1.25 hours per week on class work, in addition to regular homework.