Two weeks ago, the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health’s Center on Alcohol Marketing and Youth published a study that looked at violent crimes in relation to alcohol outlets in Baltimore. While previous research studies have looked at the correlation between crime and alcohol access, there is disagreement on whether or not on-premise (such as a bar or restraint) and off-premise (stores that sell alcohol but do not allow for consumption on the property) outlets have a stronger association with violent crime. This study used advanced methods and considered the number of alcohol outlets and the location of the outlets to better understand the association with violent crime.

The study, led by former post-doctoral fellow Pamela Tragnestein, PhD, found that a 10 percent increase in access to liquor stores and beer and wine stores had a 37 percent greater association with violent crime than on-premise outlets. They also found the type of violent crime was different for on-premise outlets than the off-premise outlets. The third important finding was that disadvantaged neighborhoods have a higher access to off-premise outlets.

The study, Outlet Type, Access to Alcohol, and Violent Crime, was published on September 26 in the journal Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research.