Skip Navigation

Mixed Methods Research Training Program for the Health Sciences

Sarah Ronis, MD, MPH

Assistant Professor of Pediatrics, School of Medicine
Case Western Reserve University

Dr. Ronis is assistant professor of pediatrics at the Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine and a faculty member in the Division of General Academic Pediatrics and the Center for Child Health Policy and Research at UH Rainbow Babies and Children's Hospital, Cleveland Ohio. In addition to providing direct clinical care to low income inner city children and supervising pediatric trainees in the ambulatory and inpatient settings, her academic work focuses on the problem of care coordination for children with special health care needs with emphasis on the optimization of health information technology-based tools to improve communication among caregivers and healthcare providers in community settings.

To date, this work has included cross-sectional secondary analysis of a large national datasets demonstrating that the financial and employment burdens of families are likely to be reduced if their child’s care meets criteria for effective care coordination in the patient centered medical home; focused surveys of parents to explore uptake, barriers to use, and preferences regarding the use of electronic personal health records in the care of their children; and collaboration in several initiatives exploring the utility, safety, and efficacy of urban pediatric acute care telemedicine services. She holds a bachelor’s degree in biological anthropology from Harvard College (2004), doctorate in medicine from Case Western Reserve University (2008), a master’s degree in public health from the University of Rochester (2014).

Congratulations are in order!

Dr. Ronis was awarded 4 years of funding from the CTSC for her mixed methods project, “Shared Decision Making for Children with Special Health Care Needs in Pediatric Primary Care,” starting July 1, 2016. Her research seeks to optimize health information technology tools to improve communication and support coordination of care for children with special health care needs.