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Wendy Klag Center for Autism & Developmental Disabilities

Early Autism Risk Longitudinal Investigation (EARLI)

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EARLI autism pregnancy study logo with text

The EARLI Study is a national research study of risk factors for having another child with autism in families already affected by the disorder.  We will identify possible causes, which could be genetic, environmental or a combination of both. Information is collected regularly from the mother during the study, and the new child will receive free developmental assessments until 3 years of age.

EARLI - Northeast Maryland

The Northeast Maryland EARLI Study site is a unique collaboration between Johns Hopkins University and the Kennedy Krieger Institute (KKI), in partnership with local organizations that help us contact eligible families including the Maryland State Department of Education.

Activities at the Northeast Maryland EARLI Early Autism Risk Longitudinal Investigation Site are under the direction of Dr. Daniele Fallin of Johns Hopkins University‚Äôs Bloomberg School of Public Health. All clinic study assessments take place at the Kennedy Krieger Institute under the supervision of EARLI Site Clinical Director Dr. Rebecca Landa, who directs the Center for Autism and Related Disorders (CARD) at Kennedy Krieger Institute.  (If you are an enrolled family and have a question about a clinic visit or developmental assessment, contact Abbey Herringshaw by email or call 443-923-7695.)

As of summer 2012, EARLI is no longer enrolling new families because of funding considerations, but our staff continues to actively work with the previously enrolled families and their new babies.

The Johns Hopkins / KKI EARLI Study Coordinator, Michelle Landrum, is available to answer questions about the study:

Michelle Landrum
Phone: (443) 287-2769 or (877) 868-8014
Email: EARLI@jhsph.edu

About EARLI

EARLI is a national research study of risk factors for having another child with autism in families already affected by the disorder. Note: Because of funding cuts, two clinic visits mentioned in the video have been replaced by mail-in assessments. EARLI babies now have clinic visits at 12 and 36 months, with mail-in surveys at 6, 18, 24 and 30 months.