Skip Navigation

Wendy Klag Center for Autism & Developmental Disabilities

Nurturing a new generation

Internships for students

2015-2016 Bloomberg School intern

Portrait of Taylor Holroyd

Taylor Holroyd is a master's student in Global Disease Epidemiology and Control. She writes: "I was a Wendy Klag Memorial Scholar for the summer of 2016, and I worked with Dr. Smith and Dr. Stone at the Maryland Center for Developmental Disabilities (MCDD) at the Kennedy Krieger Institute.  My previous experience in intellectual and developmental disabilities was limited, so I hugely appreciated the opportunity to work with prominent leaders in the field.  I gained invaluable experience in the grant writing process, knowledge translation, curriculum writing, and statistical analysis.  I was able to work with public health experts at the MCDD to examine the availability of disability services and improve accessibility for families in Maryland.

"The MCDD staff members were incredibly warm and welcoming throughout my internship, and I was pleased to feel like I was part of the team.  Dr. Smith took the time to individually mentor me, challenge me with different tasks, and ensure that I was involved in a variety of projects.  For my primary project, I was involved in analyzing the results from a Maryland caregivers and respite care survey with the Maryland Department of Human Resources in order to better address family caregivers’ needs.  I focused on analyzing and interpreting data from this survey to determine the policy implications of improving and expanding caregiver services with a state grant.  The results of this research and analysis will be used to write a manuscript that will be submitted to a peer-reviewed journal. 

"Throughout my internship, I had the opportunity to apply the skills I have learned at Hopkins in a real-world setting and contribute to the field of developmental disability research.  I also benefitted from collaboration with PACT that enabled me to work with parents with developmental disabilities in order to gain a better understanding of family experiences.  I became aware of how policy and service delivery need to be altered to meet specific disability healthcare needs.  This internship was incredibly inspiring, and I hope to continue to work with my mentors at the MCDD." 

 

2014-2015 Bloomberg School interns

Hopkins doctoral student Lydia Stewart

Lydia Stewart is a doctoral student in the Department of Mental Health.   As a Wendy Klag Scholar, she participated in a collaborative training program between the Wendy Klag Center, Maryland Center for Developmental Disability (MCDD), and the Kennedy Krieger Institute. Lydia’s research interests include developmental disability screening and intervention in low-resource settings internationally as well as employment opportunities for adults with an Autism Spectrum Disorder. She also works as a research assistant on the EARLI and SEED II studies at the Wendy Klag Center. Lydia earned her Master of Health Science in Mental Health from Johns Hopkins University in 2014 and is an honors graduate of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Gillings School of Global Public Health. 

 She writes: "During my internship, I worked with public health and policy experts at the MCDD to map disability services across Maryland and locate community and clinical resources for families receiving a new diagnosis from Kennedy Krieger.  Working with policy and service experts at the MCDD enriched my academic and research experience by increasing my awareness of disability service availability and provision in Maryland.  I also interned at Project Heal, a unique medical-legal partnership serving patients and families of Kennedy Krieger Institute,  where I mentored a local high school student through the development of a research project examining inclusion practices in extracurricular activities.  We recently presented our findings at the 2014 Association of University Centers on Disability (AUCD) conference in Washington, D.C. Interning with the MCDD and Kennedy Krieger provided a valuable summer of experiential learning and collaboration with leaders in the field of disability research and policy." 

Amanda Wylie

Amanda Wylie is in the MSPH program at Bloomberg School, in the Department of Population, Family, and Reproductive Health.  She writes:

"As a Wendy Klag Memorial Scholar recipient and current JHSPH MPH candidate, I worked with Drs. Waylon Howard, Jacqueline D. Stone, and Christopher L. Smith at the Maryland Center for Developmental Disabilities (MCCD) at Kennedy Krieger Institute.  I am interested in working with children with special health care needs by studying the predictors of child development and disability and interventions that target early childhood. I previously earned a Bachelor of Science degree in biobehavioral health at Penn State University with a minor in health and human development. Prior to this internship, I worked as a student trainee in the Epidemiology branch of the NICHD, and I am concurrently working as a research assistant for the PICS Study at JHSPH.

"My project at the MCDD has included working with a clinical program to code, interpret and analyze data in order to answer research questions pertaining to a weight management project. I learned to use multiple techniques to further investigate trends in data, including imputation strategies and latent growth modeling. Using statistical analysis systems, SAS and MPlus, I also gained experience in advance statistical analysis to include evaluation of multiple imputations to address missing data in analysis. The outcome of this project will be a manuscript for submission to a peer-reviewed journal.

"In addition to all of the statistical research skills that I have learned, I am afforded the opportunity to gain an understanding of the trials and triumphs of individuals with disabilities and their families, and learn and work alongside professionals who are making lasting contributions to the field. I am grateful for the welcoming atmosphere that the MCDD has created for student trainees and I am already inspired by the determination of the faculty and friends of the MCDD."

2013-2014 Bloomberg School interns

Julia Baller

Julia Baller, PhD (2014), writes: "As a Ph.D candidate and Wendy Klag Memorial Scholar, I developed multiple research questions, analyzed and interpreted data related to my project with the Maryland Center for Developmental Disabilities (MCDD) at Kennedy Krieger Institute. Using the Maryland Parent Survey-Youth Transition to Adulthood, I focused on analyzing and interpreting data regarding the intersection between healthcare transition services and transition services delivered through special education. The results of my research were used to write a manuscript (pending IRB approval for submission to a peer-reviewed journal).  Our findings were that parents of youth with special healthcare needs (YSHCN), who had an IEP that addressed health care needs, were more likely to report positive health care transition measures. In summary, the results suggested that parents play an integral role in advocating on behalf of their children during the IEP and health care transition planning process. 

"Overall, my experience with the MCDD has enabled me to get a much better sense of the policies in place that both help and impede families from getting the services that they need by interacting with people with disabilities, meeting families, physicians, researchers, advocates, and lawyers in the disability field. It has helped shape my dissertation research, and I have no doubt that my experiences will continue to affect my future endeavors. Some of the greatest opportunities at the MCDD are the multitudes of meetings, webinars, grand rounds, and other resources that enable trainees to hear about a diverse set of experiences and meet people from around the state and country that are committed to a similar set of issues. It may seem overwhelming, but taking advantage of these opportunities will greatly enrich your experience. More than anything else, I now know that Maryland has an extremely knowledgeable, dedicated work force committed to improving the lives of individuals with disabilities. Finally, given the phenomenal experience I had, I have no doubt that I will continue to stay in touch and collaborate with my mentors at MCDD."

Eric Rubenstein

Eric Rubenstein, ScM (2014), writes: "I was a Wendy Klag Memorial Scholar for the spring semester of 2014. I worked with Drs. Smith and Stone at the Maryland Center for Developmental Disabilities (MCDD) at Kennedy Krieger Institute to develop and submit an NIH grant proposal that would create a data collaborative for organizations in Maryland that work with people with intellectual and developmental disabilities. I learned a great deal about the process of grant writing and the importance of collaborative research. Both Drs. Smith and Stone were phenomenal mentors in this area and I will definitely use the skills developed in my career. Additionally, I did some work with data collected by the MCDD which allowed me to become more familiar in statistical programming and data presentation. On the whole, I had a great experience at the MCDD and appreciated the welcoming and helpful MCDD team. I would strongly recommend the Wendy Klag scholar experience.

"Training at the MCDD has given me practical experience and a real world perspective of the developmental disability research field. Through my coursework, I have learned a great deal about research methods and approaches, but not until training at the MCDD had I gotten the opportunity to use my skills in real world applications. The opportunity to work on a grant, from idea formation to submission, was a great experience that engrained lessons that will follow me through my career. Additionally, seeing how the staff at the Center goes about their projects was a great example of leadership and management that I will like to replicate one day."

2014 summer intern from Montgomery Blair High School

Rona Yu of Montgomery Blair High School

Rona Yu, a rising junior at Montgomery Blair High School, interned at the Wendy Klag Center for six weeks in the summer of 2014.  Rona, who is in a math, science and computer science magnet program, is the founder and captain of the Montgomery Blair High School Therapeutic Recreation Club, which works with autistic children in local schools and raises money for nonprofit organizations.  Below, Rona explains her internship:

"I had gotten a job at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health with a main focus on autism. Under the supervision of Michelle Landrum and Jamie Dahm at the Wendy Klag Center, I got a hands-on experience with both the research and public relations work done in the EARLI and SEED studies: two large studies focusing on ASDs and other developmental disabilities. This included learning about research methods and types of data, attending meetings and conferences, shadowing through phone interviews, working on recruitment mailings, visiting labs, and completing various trainings for human research ethics.  This experience extended to various other fields of science as well. With the mentoring of Shan Andrews in the Department of Epidemiology, I worked on completing a statistical program and scientific paper for quality control of genotypes through R and PLINK. I also learned more about epigenetics by researching the Dutch Famine, prenatal infection and schizophrenia, and folic acid and neural tube defects. Additionally, I talked to many other researchers in biostatistics and epigenetic fields. By doing this, I learned about how many different fields of science can be unified to study one single topic of interest.  Through my time here at JHSPH, I expanded my interests and experiences by learning more about the science and outreach methods behind developmental disability studies in epidemiology and biostatistics. This summer internship gave me an exciting, valuable, and unique opportunity to learn about various developmental disabilities through a vast variety of fields."