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Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

Johns Hopkins University

The Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and the
Johns Hopkins Center on School, Family and Community Partnerships

School Connectedness

 

There are approximately 1.5 million children and youth today in US public schools whose parents are in the military.  A high degree of mobility is demanded of these children and of their parents.  Complicating relocation is the reality that significant numbers of these young people are separated from at least one parent due to overseas deployment.  While these circumstances are unique, there are other populations of vulnerable and mobile youth whose lives are complicated by analogous factors. 

There has been a generation of research that has identified the highly protective role schools can play in moderating the academic, social and health behavior risks of youth.  Johns Hopkins University researchers have been studying school climate, academic expectations, student connectedness and school, family and community partnerships for more than 20 years.  We have worked in school-based violence prevention, pregnancy prevention and drug use prevention. 

The Military Child Initiative is based on the empirical research evidence of what works for these populations of young people.  Our goal is to move research-based practical approaches into schools and school districts so that all children and youth can thrive, especially those who are most socially mobile and emotionally vulnerable.

Please visit the following website for information on the longitudinal study of deployment and military familes, http://sites.google.com/site/militaryfamiliesdeployment/

lab photo

MILITARY CHILD INITIATIVE FINDINGS!

Our three-year study is coming to an end and we are happy to present our findings and our final report. We had the opportunity to brief senior military leadership based in Hawaii on the "Military Child in Hawaii" study. We presented both findings and recommendations. The feedback was very positive and we left with a sense that there is a new era of collaboration between the military and the Department of Education that is encouraging and exciting.

 The "Best Practices: Building Blocks for Enhancing School Environment" report and accompanying DVD, released May 22, 2007, examine the impact that the school environment has on children, offer recommendations for educators and administrators, and highlight several schools across the country that have put steps in place to create a supportive environment.

The Value of Connections

There has been a generation of research that has identified the highly protective role schools can play in moderating the academic, social and health behavior risks of youth. However, all too often, schools exacerbate the stress experienced by military youth and their families through social isolation, due, in part, to the lack of caring programs for students and well-planned strategies for family and community involvement.




Military Child Initiative
615 North Wolfe Street, E4527
Baltimore, Maryland 21205
www.jhsph.edu/mci