Skip Navigation
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health
Johns Hopkins Vaccine Initiative
Collaborating Center for Vaccine Epidemiology and Evaluation
Make this my homepage

Email to a friend
Site map
Join JHVI
Submit ideas
Feedback
Corrections
Image Credits

Print this page

2009 Vaccine News from JHSPH

Ruth Karron, MD responds in The Washington Post to the public's questions on the WHO declaration of a full scale swine flu pandemic... Read more.

The Washington Post invites Ruth Karron, MD to discuss the latest news on swine flu... Read more.

JHVI and CIR Director Ruth Karron, MD and Executive Director of the Johns Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioethics, Ruth Faden, PhD, MPH stress the importance of staying informed during the preparation of a possible swine flu pandemic... Read more.


The Economist quotes Neal Halsey, MD, on the strategic use of IPV in the efforts to eradicate polio... Read more.

Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation funds new research to determine the causes of childhood pneumonia

To help overcome the incomplete understanding of the causes of childhood pneumonia, JHSPH investigators have received three grants from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation totaling more than $40 million dollars over 5.5 years.   Orin Levine will lead the core initiative, called PERCH (Pneumonia Etiology Research for Child Health).  This initiative aims to build a new, rigorous evidence base by studying the causes of pediatric pneumonia in 5 to 10 countries across the developing world using state-of-the-art diagnostics.

Two additional studies will strengthen the initiative’s fight against pneumonia and related diseases. Hope Johnson will project the burden of disease in adolescents and adults attributable to two dangerous bacteria–the pneumococcus and the meningococcus–that together cause many cases of pneumonia and other life-threatening illnesses such as meningitis. Jennifer Moïsi will undertake an evaluation of diagnostic methods for pneumococcal disease, a major cause of childhood pneumonia, particularly in the developing world.

Together these projects will influence the development and deployment of life-saving vaccines throughout the world.

To view a New York Times article about PERCH, click here.

Spark Award Supports JHSPH Seminars

The Johns Hopkins Vaccine Initiative supported two International Health seminars at the School of Public Health featuring Dr. Brian Ward from McGill University.

Dr. Ward presented on Tuesday March 9, 2010 "High-throughput proteomics in infectious diseases: a new way to look at the host-microbial interface" and on March 10, 2010 to the Vaccine Science and Policy Seminar Series "Virus-Like Particle (VLP) vaccines made in plants: a solution to the need for inexpensive vaccines for all?"

Seminar

IVAC Seminar

The Johns Hopkins Vaccine Initiative inaugurated the Spark Award by providing support to the JHSPH International Vaccine Access Center. IVAC held its launch seminar "Innovative Approaches to Understanding Vaccine Policy Decisions" on Thursday February 18, 2009.

IVAC Seminar Sessions included:

  • Frameworks for Building Political Will
  • Social Network Mapping to Improve Vaccine Policy Processes
  • Identifying Vaccine Adoption Influencers Through Statistical Modeling
  • Beyond Cost Effectiveness: Establishing the Value of Vaccination


    CIR faculty awarded NIH funding to evaluate new vaccines.

    Ruth Karron and Anna Durbin will lead the evaluations of new live viral vaccines for adults and children through an NIH award of more than $31 million dollars.  The NIH contract, titled “Operation of a Facility for the Study of Infectious Agents, Vaccines and Antimicrobials in Adult and Pediatric Human Subjects”, will support phase I and II clinical trials of live attenuated vaccines, including vaccines for dengue, a mosquito-borne disease that is a leading global cause of hospitalization and death in children, and vaccines for respiratory syncytial virus, parainfluenza viruses, and human metapneumovirus, which are important causes of ALRI (pneumonia, croup, and wheezing) in children.


    Click here to read more recent vaccine news from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.


Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation funds new research to determine the causes of childhood pneumonia

To help overcome the incomplete understanding of the causes of childhood pneumonia, JHSPH investigators have received three grants from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation totaling more than $40 million dollars over 5.5 years.   Orin Levine will lead the core initiative, called PERCH (Pneumonia Etiology Research for Child Health).  This initiative aims to build a new, rigorous evidence base by studying the causes of pediatric pneumonia in 5 to 10 countries across the developing world using state-of-the-art diagnostics.

Two additional studies will strengthen the initiative’s fight against pneumonia and related diseases. Hope Johnson will project the burden of disease in adolescents and adults attributable to two dangerous bacteria–the pneumococcus and the meningococcus–that together cause many cases of pneumonia and other life-threatening illnesses such as meningitis. Jennifer Moïsi will undertake an evaluation of diagnostic methods for pneumococcal disease, a major cause of childhood pneumonia, particularly in the developing world.

Together these projects will influence the development and deployment of life-saving vaccines throughout the world.

To view a New York Times article about PERCH, click here.



CIR faculty awarded NIH funding to evaluate new vaccines.

Ruth Karron and Anna Durbin will lead the evaluations of new live viral vaccines for adults and children through an NIH award of more than $31 million dollars.  The NIH contract, titled “Operation of a Facility for the Study of Infectious Agents, Vaccines and Antimicrobials in Adult and Pediatric Human Subjects”, will support phase I and II clinical trials of live attenuated vaccines, including vaccines for dengue, a mosquito-borne disease that is a leading global cause of hospitalization and death in children, and vaccines for respiratory syncytial virus, parainfluenza viruses, and human metapneumovirus, which are important causes of ALRI (pneumonia, croup, and wheezing) in children.


Click here to read more recent vaccine news from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

Vaccine Day 2009
Injecting Hope: How Vaccines Save Children from Pneumonia

On October 9th, 2009, the Johns Hopkins Vaccine Initiative (JHVI) hosted the second annual Vaccine Day at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and were pleased to host special guest, Dr. Brian Greenwood, Manson Professor of Clinical Tropical Medicine at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine.

Vaccine Day 2009 Dr Greenwood

Read more about Vaccine Day or view photos of the event (photos coming soon).

Vaccine Day 2009 Poster Session
Following the presentation and panel discussion, Vaccine Day moved to Feinstone Hall for the faculty, staff and student poster session and reception. 32 posters were submitted by students, faculty and staff for Vaccine Day 2009, showcasing work from four departments. The posters highlighted the breadth of vaccine research being conducted at the School, and described pre-clinical studies, phase I and II clinical trials, cost effectiveness studies, policy analysis, and implementation studies.

Vaccine Day Poster Session 2009

Read more about the poster session, including winning posters and a list of all posters.

vaacine day 2009

 


 

Vaccine Day 2009
Injecting Hope: How Vaccines Save Children from Pneumonia

On October 9th, 2009, the Johns Hopkins Vaccine Initiative (JHVI) hosted the second annual Vaccine Day at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and were pleased to host special guest, Dr. Brian Greenwood, Manson Professor of Clinical Tropical Medicine at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine.

Vaccine Day 2009 Dr Greenwood

Read more about Vaccine Day or view photos of the event (photos coming soon).

Vaccine Day 2009 Poster Session
Following the presentation and panel discussion, Vaccine Day moved to Feinstone Hall for the faculty, staff and student poster session and reception. 32 posters were submitted by students, faculty and staff for Vaccine Day 2009, showcasing work from four departments. The posters highlighted the breadth of vaccine research being conducted at the School, and described pre-clinical studies, phase I and II clinical trials, cost effectiveness studies, policy analysis, and implementation studies.

Vaccine Day Poster Session 2009

Read more about the poster session, including winning posters and a list of all posters.

vaacine day 2009
 


 

2008 Vaccine News from JHSPH

JHSPH virologist Andy Pekosz, PhD, and JHVI and CIR Director Ruth Karron, MD discuss past, present and future influenza vaccines... Read more.
A series of posters were presented by PneumoADIP at the ISPPD conference in  Iceland  addressing the perceived affordability, impact and demand of the pneumococcal  conjugate vaccine…Read more

Nancy Kass, SD, of the Berman Institute of Bioethics has been elected to Institute of Medicine... Read more.

NPR News interviewed Neal Halsey, MD on the slow HPV vaccination rates, parental doubt and the consequences of waiting... Read more.

According to JHSPH researchers, newborns can be protected from seasonal flu when their mothers are vaccinated during pregnancy.... Read more.

The Johns Hopkins Vaccine Initiative and Vaccine Day festivities are highlighted in the 2008 Fall JHSPH Department of International Health Newsletter, The Globe... Read more.

Katherine L. O'Brien, MD, MPH, Associate Professor, International Health, was the recipient of the 2008 Sabin Young Investigator Award for her many contributions to the field of vaccines and her commitment to life-saving medical discoveries... Read more.

JHSPH researchers collaborate with IOMAI and UTSPH to show that use of a  patch containing heat-labile toxin from Escherichia coli against travelers' diarrhea  is safe and efficacious.
ETEC is a major cause of diarrhea in travelers in endemic areas and to young children  living in developing countries…Read more

JHSPH researchers evaluate vaccine knowledge and practices of primary care  providers of exempt vs. vaccinated children.
Comparisons of vaccine knowledge, attitudes and practices of primary care  providers for fully vaccinated children and children who are exempt from school  immunization requirements were made...Read more

Click here for news from 2007, 2006 and 2005.

Vaccine Day 2008; a day to honor David Heymann and to launch the JHVI

vaccine day

On September 19th, 2008, the Johns Hopkins Vaccine Initiative (JHVI) hosted the first annual Vaccine Day at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Festivities began at 12:30 in Sommer Hall with a keynote address by David Heymann, WHO Assistant Director-General for Health Security and the Environment, and Representative of the Director-General for Polio Eradication. Dr. Heymann's talk was entitled: Diplomacy: Improving Global Access to Vaccines and Good Health.

Read more or view pictures from Vaccine Day 2008.


David Heymann receives the Dean's Medal

deans medalOn September 19th, 2008, Dr. David Heymann was awarded the Dean's Medal for leadership in the global public health effort to control infectious diseases.The Dean's Medal is the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health's highest honor and recognizes individuals who have made a significant contribution to the field of public health.Dean Michael J. Klag, MD, MPH stated, "Throughout his career, David Heymann has demonstrated exemplary leadership in the global fight against infectious disease. David brings both intelligence and compassion to his work and it is a great privilege to award the Dean's Medal to David." Read more.

To watch a video of David Heymann's keynote address and Dean Klag awarding the Dean's medal to Dr. Heymann, click here.


Vaccine Day Poster Session
poster session

47 posters were submitted by students, faculty and staff for Vaccine Day, showcasing work from 4 departments.Topics ranged from preclinical vaccine development to cost effectiveness of vaccinations in the developing world. Prizes were awarded to three students for outstanding posters: first place went to third-year International Health PhD candidate Julia Driessen, second place went to Epidemiology PhD candidate Chuka Anude, and third place went to Morgan Marks, who is a dual degree candidate in Epidemiology (PhD), and Molecular Microbiology and Immunology (ScM). To see a list of all posters, and abstracts from the prize-winning posters, click here.


 

2007 Vaccine News from JHSPH

Vaccines for the Vulnerable around the World
Orin Levine and Michael Klag
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health
January 3, 2007

It's flu season, and many Americans have been to the doctor or school clinic  for a flu shot…Read more.

Hib Vaccine: A Critical Ally in Asia’s Effort to Reduce Child Deaths
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health
June 27, 2007

New Study Shows Hib Vaccine Protects Children from Significant Burden  of Life-Threatening Pneumonia and Meningitis…Read more.

PneumoADIP and Hib Initiative’s Pilot Child Pneumonia Prevention Africa Regional Advocacy Workshop a Success 
PneumoADIP and Hib Initiative
October, 2007

GAVI’s PneumoADIP and the Hib Initiative hosted their first Child Pneumonia Prevention Africa Regional Advocacy Workshop in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, October 23-25, 2007. Twenty-one prominent child health experts from eight African countries—Kenya, Uganda, Malawi, Zimbabwe, Democratic Republic of Congo, Nigeria, Ethiopia and Tanzania—took part in the event...Read more.

Study conducted by Dr William Moss, MD, MPH, and colleagues reveals that measles vaccinations need to be repeated to protect HIV-infected children.
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health
July, 2007

HIV-infected children may require repeat measles vaccination for protection, according to new research from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and other institutions...Read more.


 

2006 Vaccine News from JHSPH

Ruth Karron Named Chair of FDA Advisory Committee
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health
April 28, 2006

Ruth Karron, MD, professor in the Bloomberg School's Department of  International Health, was named chair of the U.S. Food and Drug  Administration's Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee…
Read more.

HPV Vaccine Holds Promise for Preventing Cervical Cancer
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health
May 26, 2006

On May 18, an advisory committee recommended that the U.S. Food and Drug   Administration grant approval of a new vaccine, Gardasil™, which was shown   to prevent infection from human papillomaviruses (HPVs) that cause cervical cancer…Read more.

 


 

2005 Vaccine News from JHSPH

Refining the Malaria Vaccine Agenda
February 14, 2005
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

Usually when malaria scientists gather to discuss vaccines, their conferences are  heavy on vaccinology but light on the foundation of vaccine development: the  body's immune response to the parasite…Read more.

Vaccine Has Potential for Prevention of Respiratory Papillomatosis 
December 13, 2005
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

The arrival of an FDA-approved human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccine in  summer 2006 is expected to not only decrease the incidence of cervical cancer  and indicators of cervical cancer, but it will also positively impact a less known  disease.…Read more.

Find Faculty

To find faculty working in a specific vaccine-related discipline, select from the list below:

Global Project Map

JHVI Global Project Map

JHSPH Faculty members are engaged in vaccine-related research projects around the world. Click here or on the map to learn more about these projects.

Johns Hopkins University

©, Johns Hopkins University. All rights reserved.
Web policies, 615 N. Wolfe Street, Baltimore, MD 21205