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2010 Vaccine News from JHSPH

gavi

BRIEFING ON NEW GLOBAL CHILD MORTALITY DATA AND LOCAL PROGRESS, AND IMMUNIZATION SITE VISITS
(Reception to follow)

A Breakthrough for Child Survival in the Poorest Nations and America's Cities: The GAVI Alliance and Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health laud the success of vaccines to staunch child mortality, and applaud Baltimore's efforts to Immunize Every Child.

Thursday, July 22, 2010
10:00 a.m. to 11:45 a.m.

Over the last 15 years, there has been tremendous progress in immunizing the world's children, resulting in a dramatic drop in child mortality since the 1990s in America and around the world. Yet, new data confirms that just two vaccine-preventable diseases account for almost 40% of child deaths globally.

According to a recent study in the Journal of Urban Health, Baltimore is one of six American cities that have been the most successful in improving childhood immunization rates. According to the authors of that study, "The huge gains [in immunization rates] demonstrated by the cities of Baltimore and Chicago...attests to the power of cities to help their families overcome barriers to timely immunizations."

And, at the same time, Baltimore is leading the charge against diseases that kill millions of children under the age of five in the rest of the world with new vaccines like one targeting pneumococcal disease, developed in part by Baltimore's own Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, a major global center of vaccine research.

In this event, sponsored by the GAVI Alliance, Peter Beilenson, MD, MPH, Health Officer of Maryland's Howard County, will deliver a keynote address on Baltimore's incredible progress in saving the lives of the city's children through immunization, and what its success means for some of the world's poorest nations. Robert Black, MD, MPH, Chair of the Department of International Health at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, will then lead an expert panel on the lifesaving power of immunization at both local and global levels, as well as new evidence supporting the introduction of new vaccines, in particular those for rotavirus and pneumococcal disease: the biggest killers of children worldwide.

For more information and to RSVP, please contact Katy Lenard at klenard@burnesscommunications.com or +1-301-652-1558 or click here.



gavi

BRIEFING ON NEW GLOBAL CHILD MORTALITY DATA AND LOCAL PROGRESS, AND IMMUNIZATION SITE VISITS
(Reception to follow)

A Breakthrough for Child Survival in the Poorest Nations and America's Cities: The GAVI Alliance and Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health laud the success of vaccines to staunch child mortality, and applaud Baltimore's efforts to Immunize Every Child.

Thursday, July 22, 2010
10:00 a.m. to 11:45 a.m.

Over the last 15 years, there has been tremendous progress in immunizing the world's children, resulting in a dramatic drop in child mortality since the 1990s in America and around the world. Yet, new data confirms that just two vaccine-preventable diseases account for almost 40% of child deaths globally.

According to a recent study in the Journal of Urban Health, Baltimore is one of six American cities that have been the most successful in improving childhood immunization rates. According to the authors of that study, "The huge gains [in immunization rates] demonstrated by the cities of Baltimore and Chicago...attests to the power of cities to help their families overcome barriers to timely immunizations."

And, at the same time, Baltimore is leading the charge against diseases that kill millions of children under the age of five in the rest of the world with new vaccines like one targeting pneumococcal disease, developed in part by Baltimore's own Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, a major global center of vaccine research.

In this event, sponsored by the GAVI Alliance, Peter Beilenson, MD, MPH, Health Officer of Maryland's Howard County, will deliver a keynote address on Baltimore's incredible progress in saving the lives of the city's children through immunization, and what its success means for some of the world's poorest nations. Robert Black, MD, MPH, Chair of the Department of International Health at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, will then lead an expert panel on the lifesaving power of immunization at both local and global levels, as well as new evidence supporting the introduction of new vaccines, in particular those for rotavirus and pneumococcal disease: the biggest killers of children worldwide.

For more information and to RSVP, please contact Katy Lenard at klenard@burnesscommunications.com or +1-301-652-1558 or click here.

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