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2009 Vaccine News from JHSPH

Ruth Karron, MD responds in The Washington Post to the public's questions on the WHO declaration of a full scale swine flu pandemic... Read more.

The Washington Post invites Ruth Karron, MD to discuss the latest news on swine flu... Read more.

JHVI and CIR Director Ruth Karron, MD and Executive Director of the Johns Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioethics, Ruth Faden, PhD, MPH stress the importance of staying informed during the preparation of a possible swine flu pandemic... Read more.


The Economist quotes Neal Halsey, MD, on the strategic use of IPV in the efforts to eradicate polio...
Read more.

Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation funds new research to determine the causes of childhood pneumonia

To help overcome the incomplete understanding of the causes of childhood pneumonia, JHSPH investigators have received three grants from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation totaling more than $40 million dollars over 5.5 years.   Orin Levine will lead the core initiative, called PERCH (Pneumonia Etiology Research for Child Health).  This initiative aims to build a new, rigorous evidence base by studying the causes of pediatric pneumonia in 5 to 10 countries across the developing world using state-of-the-art diagnostics.

Two additional studies will strengthen the initiative’s fight against pneumonia and related diseases. Hope Johnson will project the burden of disease in adolescents and adults attributable to two dangerous bacteria–the pneumococcus and the meningococcus–that together cause many cases of pneumonia and other life-threatening illnesses such as meningitis. Jennifer Moïsi will undertake an evaluation of diagnostic methods for pneumococcal disease, a major cause of childhood pneumonia, particularly in the developing world.

Together these projects will influence the development and deployment of life-saving vaccines throughout the world.

To view a New York Times article about PERCH, click here.

Spark Award Supports JHSPH Seminars

The Johns Hopkins Vaccine Initiative supported two International Health seminars at the School of Public Health featuring Dr. Brian Ward from McGill University.

Dr. Ward presented on Tuesday March 9, 2010 "High-throughput proteomics in infectious diseases: a new way to look at the host-microbial interface" and on March 10, 2010 to the Vaccine Science and Policy Seminar Series "Virus-Like Particle (VLP) vaccines made in plants: a solution to the need for inexpensive vaccines for all?"

Seminar

IVAC Seminar

The Johns Hopkins Vaccine Initiative inaugurated the Spark Award by providing support to the JHSPH International Vaccine Access Center. IVAC held its launch seminar "Innovative Approaches to Understanding Vaccine Policy Decisions" on Thursday February 18, 2009.

IVAC Seminar Sessions included:

  • Frameworks for Building Political Will
  • Social Network Mapping to Improve Vaccine Policy Processes
  • Identifying Vaccine Adoption Influencers Through Statistical Modeling
  • Beyond Cost Effectiveness: Establishing the Value of Vaccination


    CIR faculty awarded NIH funding to evaluate new vaccines.

    Ruth Karron and Anna Durbin will lead the evaluations of new live viral vaccines for adults and children through an NIH award of more than $31 million dollars.  The NIH contract, titled “Operation of a Facility for the Study of Infectious Agents, Vaccines and Antimicrobials in Adult and Pediatric Human Subjects”, will support phase I and II clinical trials of live attenuated vaccines, including vaccines for dengue, a mosquito-borne disease that is a leading global cause of hospitalization and death in children, and vaccines for respiratory syncytial virus, parainfluenza viruses, and human metapneumovirus, which are important causes of ALRI (pneumonia, croup, and wheezing) in children.


    Click here to read more recent vaccine news from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.


Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation funds new research to determine the causes of childhood pneumonia

To help overcome the incomplete understanding of the causes of childhood pneumonia, JHSPH investigators have received three grants from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation totaling more than $40 million dollars over 5.5 years.   Orin Levine will lead the core initiative, called PERCH (Pneumonia Etiology Research for Child Health).  This initiative aims to build a new, rigorous evidence base by studying the causes of pediatric pneumonia in 5 to 10 countries across the developing world using state-of-the-art diagnostics.

Two additional studies will strengthen the initiative’s fight against pneumonia and related diseases. Hope Johnson will project the burden of disease in adolescents and adults attributable to two dangerous bacteria–the pneumococcus and the meningococcus–that together cause many cases of pneumonia and other life-threatening illnesses such as meningitis. Jennifer Moïsi will undertake an evaluation of diagnostic methods for pneumococcal disease, a major cause of childhood pneumonia, particularly in the developing world.

Together these projects will influence the development and deployment of life-saving vaccines throughout the world.

To view a New York Times article about PERCH, click here.


CIR faculty awarded NIH funding to evaluate new vaccines.

Ruth Karron and Anna Durbin will lead the evaluations of new live viral vaccines for adults and children through an NIH award of more than $31 million dollars.  The NIH contract, titled “Operation of a Facility for the Study of Infectious Agents, Vaccines and Antimicrobials in Adult and Pediatric Human Subjects”, will support phase I and II clinical trials of live attenuated vaccines, including vaccines for dengue, a mosquito-borne disease that is a leading global cause of hospitalization and death in children, and vaccines for respiratory syncytial virus, parainfluenza viruses, and human metapneumovirus, which are important causes of ALRI (pneumonia, croup, and wheezing) in children.


Click here to read more recent vaccine news from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

Vaccine Day 2009
Injecting Hope: How Vaccines Save Children from Pneumonia

On October 9th, 2009, the Johns Hopkins Vaccine Initiative (JHVI) hosted the second annual Vaccine Day at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and were pleased to host special guest, Dr. Brian Greenwood, Manson Professor of Clinical Tropical Medicine at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine.

Vaccine Day 2009 Dr Greenwood

Read more about Vaccine Day or view photos of the event (photos coming soon).

Vaccine Day 2009 Poster Session
Following the presentation and panel discussion, Vaccine Day moved to Feinstone Hall for the faculty, staff and student poster session and reception. 32 posters were submitted by students, faculty and staff for Vaccine Day 2009, showcasing work from four departments. The posters highlighted the breadth of vaccine research being conducted at the School, and described pre-clinical studies, phase I and II clinical trials, cost effectiveness studies, policy analysis, and implementation studies.

Vaccine Day Poster Session 2009

Read more about the poster session, including winning posters and a list of all posters.

vaacine day 2009






Vaccine Day 2009
Injecting Hope: How Vaccines Save Children from Pneumonia

On October 9th, 2009, the Johns Hopkins Vaccine Initiative (JHVI) hosted the second annual Vaccine Day at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and were pleased to host special guest, Dr. Brian Greenwood, Manson Professor of Clinical Tropical Medicine at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine.

Vaccine Day 2009 Dr Greenwood

Read more about Vaccine Day or view photos of the event (photos coming soon).

Vaccine Day 2009 Poster Session
Following the presentation and panel discussion, Vaccine Day moved to Feinstone Hall for the faculty, staff and student poster session and reception. 32 posters were submitted by students, faculty and staff for Vaccine Day 2009, showcasing work from four departments. The posters highlighted the breadth of vaccine research being conducted at the School, and described pre-clinical studies, phase I and II clinical trials, cost effectiveness studies, policy analysis, and implementation studies.

Vaccine Day Poster Session 2009

Read more about the poster session, including winning posters and a list of all posters.

vaacine day 2009




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To find faculty working in a specific vaccine-related discipline, select from the list below:

Global Project Map

JHVI Global Project Map

JHSPH Faculty members are engaged in vaccine-related research projects around the world. Click here or on the map to learn more about these projects.

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