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Johns Hopkins International Injury Research Unit

A World Health Organization Collaborating Center for Injuries, Violence and Accident Prevention

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This week, two important global safety meetings will take place at the World Health Organization (WHO) headquarters in Geneva, Switzerland.  

The first will be to address effective coordination and implementation of activities for child injury prevention in low- and middle-income countries and the second will be to launch the Global Status Report on Road Safety 2013. The director of the Johns Hopkins International Injury Research Unit, Dr. Adnan Hyder, will be attending both.

As part of the UN’s Decade of Action for Road Safety 2011-2020, the Global Status Reports on Road Safety will serve as monitoring tools to measure the impact of the Decade on stabilizing and then reducing the level of road traffic deaths around the world.

 Road traffic injuries kill nearly 1.3 million people annually and if current trends continue, road crashes are predicted to become the fifth leading cause of death by 2030.

Follow Dr. Hyder on Twitter for live coverage of the events: and check our Twitter page for updates, too!

And stay tuned for more in-depth coverage of the launch of the Global Status Report. 

Unintentional injuries are a major cause of death and disability worldwide, especially among children. Each year, more than 875,000 children die from preventable injuries, with millions more injured or permanently disabled.  These injuries disproportionately affect children in low- and middle-income countries.  While significant progress has been made over the last several decades to understand the epidemiology of injuries in children, implementing effective solutions remains a global challenge.

Recently, members of the Johns Hopkins International Injury Research Unit (JH-IIRU), along with colleagues from the World Health Organization (WHO), published a study that estimates between 8,000 and 80,000 lives could potentially be saved each year if certain injury prevention interventions are implemented.

In “Saving 1000 Children a Day: The Potential of Child and Adolescent Injury Prevention,” published in the International Journal of Child and Adolescent Health, JH-IIRU faculty members worked with colleagues in the WHO’s Department of Violence and Injury Prevention and Disability to estimate the total number of children’s lives that could be potentially saved worldwide through the implementation of interventions that have been shown to be effective.

The results of the team’s extensive literature review and analysis of existing interventions suggests that there might be tremendous benefits—up to 1000 children per day—that may be realized through enhanced coverage of existing interventions which have already been tried and tested.

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On April 18th, as part of the effort to draw attention to the growing burden of road traffic injuries, the Johns Hopkins International Injury Research Unit (JH-IIRU) launched “Public Health Burden of Road Traffic Injuries: An Assessment from Ten Low- and Middle-Income Countries,” a special issue of Traffic Injury Prevention. A noontime seminar at the Bloomberg School of Public Health in Baltimore, which featured panelists from the World Health Organization (WHO) and the Global Road Safety Partnership (GRSP), two of the Road Safety in 10 Countries project consortium partners, marked the occasion.
Guest panelists Margie Peden from WHO and Gayle DiPietro from GRSP joined JH-IIRU Director Adnan Hyder and Senior Technical Advisor, David Bishai to announce the special issue, which highlights the work the RS-10 Project is doing.  This landmark publication includes 11 scientific papers jointly authored with 50 colleagues from JH-IIRU and their in-country collaborators that contribute much-needed new knowledge to the burgeoning issue of road traffic injuries in low- and middle- income countries.

L-R: Gayle DiPietro, Adnan Hyder, Margie Peden and David Bishai

Gayle DiPietro

Margie Peden

To read more about the event, click here.

To access the special issue of Traffic Injury Prevention, click

To find out more about the Johns Hopkins International Injury Research Unit and the Road Safety In 10 Countries Project, contact us at

Johns Hopkins International Injury Research Unit (JH-IIRU) director, Adnan Hyder, and colleagues from the World Health Organization, including health economist Dan Chisholm and coordinator of unintentional injuries, Margie Peden, recently published an article in the prestigious British Medical Journal, entitled "Cost Effectiveness of Strategies to Combat Road Traffic Injuries in sub-Saharan Africa and South East Asia: Mathematical Modelling Study." In it, the research team set out to identify and estimate population level costs of five intervention strategies for reducing road traffic injuries. 

Although there is wide variation across the globe in the way that roads are used and injuries are caused, the study attempted to understand the underlying patterns of road use and injury burden in order to estimate the potential impact of different road safety measures on the health of associated populations.

Dr. Hyder and his colleagues concluded that their findings, which maintain that a combination of strategies (e.g. the joint enforcement of speed limits, drink-driving laws and helmet use) are expected to be the most cost effective, can provide a useful analytical baseline against which more country-specific assessments can be made. This analysis can provide an important basis for decision making and resource allocation in global road safety.

Read the complete article

For more information on JH-IIRU's work in road safety, such as the Road Safety in 10 Countries project (RS-10),
contact us, or visit

The “Expert Consultation on Motorcyclist Injury Prevention in the Americas” was held at the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) Headquarters in Washington, D.C. on 15-16 November 2011. The meeting was co-hosted by PAHO, the World Health Organization (WHO) and the Johns Hopkins University International Injury Research Unit (IIRU). Dr. Abdul Bachani, the associate director for training and capacity development, and Jeffrey Lunnen, research program coordinator, attended the meeting on behalf of the unit.

Experts from nine countries in the region, including Argentina, Brazil, Colombia, Guatemala, Mexico, and Venezuela, attended the meeting to discuss the emerging issue of motorcycle-related injuries in the Americas. Participants from organizations such as EMBARQ, the Inter-American Development Bank, Mexico’s National Institute of Public Health, and the Universidade de São Paulo analyzed current interventions from several sectors designed and implemented to address this issue. A draft document to summarize the group’s main recommendations is expected to be developed by PAHO. Upon the completion of the drafting of these recommendations, a policy brief and regional strategy will be developed. For more information please contact:

Participants at the two-day experts' meeting on motorcycle-related injuries in the Americas co-hosted by PAHO, WHO and IIRU.
Photo rights belong to PAHO.

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