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Johns Hopkins International Injury Research Unit

A World Health Organization Collaborating Center for Injuries, Violence and Accident Prevention

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Keyword: traffic injury prevention

 

Contributing to nearly 2.0% of all deaths, road traffic injuries (RTIs) are a major public health threat in the Republic of Turkey.  Unfortunately, major gaps in data collection, particularly with respect to RTIs, continue to exist in the country, despite the significance of this growing epidemic.

Because of this, a team--including Johns Hopkins International Injury Research Unit (JH-IIRU) associated faculty, Prasanthi Puvanachandra and research assistant Connie Hoe, as well as colleagues from the Middle Eastern Technical University (METU) in Ankara, Turkey-- have analyzed available secondary data sources and completed a comprehensive review of scientifically published studies in order to present an overview of the epidemiology of RTIs in Turkey.

Their findings, published in the paper, “Burden of Road Traffic Injuries in Turkey,” reveal the burden of RTIs on the health of the Turkish population.  Despite new technologies such as the novel digital recording systems to record pre-hospital services and GPS tracking of road traffic crashes by police, which have allowed for a more accurate picture of the burden of RTIs in Turkey, there are still considerable gaps and limitations within the data systems. Incorporation of standardized definitions, regular data audits and timely review of collected data will improve the utility of RTI data and allow it to be used to influence policy.

As part of the Road Safety in 10 Countries project (RS-10), in 2012, JH-IIRU published “Public Health Burden of Road Traffic Injuries: An Assessment from Ten Low- and Middle-Income Countries,” a special issue of Traffic Injury Prevention. This landmark publication includes 11 scientific papers jointly authored with 50 colleagues from JH-IIRU and their in-country collaborators that contribute much-needed new knowledge to the burgeoning issue of road traffic injuries in low- and middle- income countries.

You can access the full article along with the entire special issue here: http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/gcpi20/13/sup1

To find out more about JH-IIRU and road safety, contact us at IIRU@JHSPH.edu

The World Health Organization estimates that road traffic injuries (RTIs) account for approximately 1.2 million deaths annually around the globe, with the majority occurring in low- and middle-income countries. In countries like Cambodia, motorcycles are a common form of transportation, and their popularity is predicted to increase.

Head injuries are a main cause of disability and death in motorcycle crashes, but helmet use in Cambodia remains relatively low, despite the fact that helmet-wearing is a proven injury prevention intervention .
 
In order to assist with better planning and implementation of injury prevention strategies, JH-IIRU team members, including Associate Director Abdulgafoor M. Bachani, along with colleagues from Handicap International, Belgium and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention published, “Helmet Use Among Motorcyclists in Cambodia: A Survey of Use, Knowledge, Attitudes and Practices.” The goal of the study was to assess the current status of helmet use in five districts in Cambodia as well as knowledge, attitudes and practices related to helmet use. 

As part of the Road Safety in 10 Countries project (RS-10), in 2012, JH-IIRU published “Public Health Burden of Road Traffic Injuries: An Assessment from Ten Low- and Middle-Income Countries,” a special issue of Traffic Injury Prevention. This landmark publication includes 11 scientific papers jointly authored with 50 colleagues from JH-IIRU and their in-country collaborators that contribute much-needed new knowledge to the burgeoning issue of road traffic injuries in low- and middle- income countries.

You can access the full article along with the entire special issue here.

To find out more about JH-IIRU and road safety, contact us at
IIRU@JHSPH.edu

Typical of many developing countries, Vietnam’s burden of road traffic injuries (RTIs) is high—about half of all injury-related fatalities are from RTIs-- and as the population has increased, the number of motor vehicles has risen proportionately as well. And despite Vietnam having one of the strictest alcohol legislations in the region, a recent study concluded that more than 10% of all road traffic crashes were caused by alcohol.

Recently, members of the Johns Hopkins International Injury Research Unit (JH-IIRU), including associate faculty member Nhan T. Tran, associate director Abdulgafoor M. Bachani and Jeffrey C. Lunnen, along with their colleagues from the Hanoi School of Public Health and the World Health Organization, Vietnam, published a study aimed at illustrating the knowledge, attitudes and practices (KAPs) around alcohol use and drinking and driving by age and sex in three provinces in Vietnam.

The study, entitled “Drinking and Driving in Vietnam: Public Knowledge, Attitudes and Practices,” which appears in the special issue of Traffic Injury Prevention, concluded that in order to effectively reduce the prevalence of drinking and driving in Vietnam, first understanding the prevailing attitudes surrounding the practice is essential.  The study found that an increased enforcement-based, multifaceted approach, which may include enhanced enforcement of existing legislation, increased social marketing and programs that provide alternatives to drinking and driving, is needed.

In the spring of 2012, The JH-IIRU published “Public Health Burden of Road Traffic Injuries: An Assessment from Ten Low- and Middle-Income Countries,” a special issue of Traffic Injury Prevention as part of theRoad Safety in 10 Countries project (RS-10). This landmark publication includes 11 scientific papers jointly authored with 50 colleagues from JH-IIRU and their in-country collaborators that contribute much-needed new knowledge to the burgeoning issue of road traffic injuries in low- and middle- income countries.

You can access the full article along with the entire special issue here.

Road traffic crashes in India are the highest in the world, with more than half a million road traffic injuries and 120,000 related deaths each year. Because of these shocking figures, it is imperative that road safety policies and control programs are implemented at both the national and state levels as quickly as possible.

In order to effectively evaluate current policies, as well as formulate and implement new ones for the prevention of road traffic crashes, researchers must have good quality road traffic data.  John Hopkins International Injury Research Unit (JH-IIRU) team members, including Dr. Shivam Gupta and Shirin Wadhwaiya, along with colleagues from the National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences, India, address this issue in “Evidence-Based Road Safety Practice in India: Assessment of the Adequacy of Publicly Available Data in Meeting Requirements for Comprehensive Road Safety Data Systems.”

The researchers used the recently published good practices manual on data collection from the World Health Organization (WHO) to compare current publicly available data sources from the National Crime Records Bureau (NCRB) and the Ministry of Road Transport and Highways (MORTH).  The study found that while data at the national level was more comprehensive than at the state level, there is still an urgent need to improve data collection and documentation at all levels, which will make possible continued effective road safety research.

“Evidence-Based Road Safety Practice in India: Assessment of the Adequacy of Publicly Available Data in Meeting Requirements for Comprehensive Road Safety Data Systems,” is part of “Public Health Burden of Road Traffic Injuries: An Assessment from Ten Low- and Middle-Income Countries,” a special issue of Traffic Injury Prevention published by the JH-IIRU as part of the Road Safety in 10 Countries project (RS-10). This landmark publication includes 11 scientific papers jointly authored with 50 colleagues from JH-IIRU and their in-country collaborators that contribute much-needed new knowledge to the burgeoning issue of road traffic injuries in low- and middle- income countries.

You can access the full article along with the entire special issue here.

To find out more about the Johns Hopkins International Injury Research Unit, contact us at IIRU@jhsph.edu.

While it’s well-known that road traffic injuries (RTIs) are one of the leading causes of death and disability worldwide, estimates on the burden of injury in specific countries, especially those in the developing world, are often inaccurate or insufficient.  This is true in Kenya, where estimates quantifying the burden of road traffic injuries exist, but are more than 10 years old, making it difficult to demonstrate the magnitude of the problem to decision-makers in the country. What’s more, as countries like Kenya develop, the number of vehicles increase with the enhancement of road infrastructure. This increase often leads to higher rates of speed which then leads to more RTIs.

In the paper “Road Traffic Injuries in Kenya: The Health Burden and Risk Factors in Two Districts,” members of the JH-IIRU team, including associate directors Abdulgafoor M. Bachani and Kent Stevens, as well as Hadley Herbert, along with colleagues from the Department of Public Health at Kenyatta University in Nairobi and the Ministry of Public Health and Sanitation aim to address this issue.

The goal of the paper was to assess the current status of RTIs in Kenya using police and vital registration records. The team also conducted observational studies of three risk factors—speeding, helmet use and reflective clothing use—in two districts, Naivasha and Thika.

The assessment revealed that the burden of RTIs continues to increase, highlighting the necessity of a renewed effort to address this burden with a focus on incr
easing helmet and reflective clothing use, while enforcing speed limits.

As part of the Road Safety in 10 Countries project (RS-10), in 2012, the Johns Hopkins International Injury Research Unit (JH-IIRU) published “Public Health Burden of Road Traffic Injuries: An Assessment from Ten Low- and Middle-Income Countries,” a special issue of Traffic Injury Prevention. This landmark publication includes 11 scientific papers jointly authored with 50 colleagues from JH-IIRU and their in-country collaborators that contribute much-needed new knowledge to the burgeoning issue of road traffic injuries in low- and middle- income countries.

You can access the full article along with the entire special issue here.

To find out more about JH-IIRU and road safety, contact us at IIRU@JHSPH.edu

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