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Johns Hopkins International Injury Research Unit

A World Health Organization Collaborating Center for Injuries, Violence and Accident Prevention

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Keyword: road traffic injuries research network
The Road Traffic Injuries Research Network (RTIRN) is a partnership of several individuals and institutions that collaborate to further research on the impact, causes and strategies for the prevention of road traffic injuries (RTIs) in low- and-middle income countries (LMICs). The current secretariat team have been delighted to work with the entire RTIRN community, but now, after four years, the RTIRN is please to a announce a call for proposals to host the RTIRN secretariat. 
 
In accordance with the decision of the RTIRN board to have a rotating secretariat, this “Request for Proposals” invites institutions in LMICs (as defined by the World Bank) to express their interest in hosting the network’s secretariat following the completion of the current secretariat’s term ending February 2014. 
 
For complete information and guidelines, please go to http://www.rtirn.net/ and follow the link on ther homepage. Deadline for proppsals is February 1, 2014. (23:59hrs Mexico time). Please note that there will be no extension granted.
 
Proposals should be submitted with cover letter electronically to secretariat@rtirn.net as either a Word document or PDF attachment. Please indicate in the subject line of the email “Proposal to host RTIRN Secretariat.”
 
For any additional questions regarding eligibility or program requirements, please contact the RTIRN Coordinator at: administrator@rtirn.net. Please do not send applications to this address. 
 
 

About 50% of the motorcycle helmets being worn in many low and middle-income countries (LMICs) are not likely to provide the protection needed to prevent injury and death, according to the findings of a study undertaken in nine LMICs in Africa, Asia and the Americas, coordinated by the Road Traffic Injuries Research Network (RTIRN), and supported by the World Bank Global Road Safety Facility and the World Health Organization (WHO) Department of Violence and Injury Prevention.  More than 5,000 motorcyclists were included in the study, which showed that about half the helmets being worn by these motorcyclists did not conform to national and international standards.
Those purchasing lower cost helmets were most likely to be wearing poor quality helmets. Market surveys of retailers in each of these nine countries uniformly showed that these poor quality helmets sell for about a third of the price of high quality helmets.  The study also showed that legislation prohibiting the use, sale and manufacture of these helmets was absent in many of these countries and where such legislation existed, it was not supported by enforcement strategies.
 “Many governments around the world, supported by the WHO, are recognizing the importance of implementing helmet wearing campaigns, given the proven effectiveness of helmets in reducing deaths and serious head injuries.  However these findings are very concerning.” said Professor Robyn Norton, RTIRN Chair Emeritus and Principal Director of The George Institute for Global Health.

The results suggest that the introduction of helmet wearing campaigns need to also focus on strategies aimed at reducing the costs of “standard” helmets, as well as both legislation and enforcement to ensure that poor quality helmets are not being used. 
“This multi-country study has provided very useful evidence base for policy and decision makers in order to strengthen their national strategies and their work aimed at preventing injuries in these vulnerable road users” said Dr. Adnan Hyder, RTIRN board chair and director of the Johns Hopkins International Injury Research Unit (JH-IIRU).

The RTIRN has supported research and research capacity in LMICs for a decade, thanks to the funds received by different partners, such as the Global Road Safety Facility of the World Bank, as well as the Global Forum for Health Research, the World Health Organization and the George Institute for Global Health, among others.
During the past decade, the RTIRN has developed strategic activities that contribute significantly to both capacity development and research promotion in the field of RTIs. In the past five years, RTIRN supported nine young researchers in their work on road safety and funded four sabbaticals for senior researchers. The RTIRN also supported nine research centers that participated in this multi-country research study.

“The Use of Non-Standard Motorcycle Helmets in Low- and Middle-Income Countries: A Multi-Centre Study,” is published online first on the Injury Prevention website.

Access the full paper here: http://injuryprevention.bmj.com/content/early/2012/11/08/injuryprev-2012-040348.short?rss=1

This week marks the opening of Safety 2012, the 11th World Conference on Injury Prevention and Safety Promotion in New Zealand, but JH-IIRU team members have been busy participating in several pre-conference meetings.

On September 29, JH-IIRU director, Adnan Hyder, participated in a workshop aimed at training journalists in health and scientific reporting. Organized by the World Health Organization (WHO), the panel discussion Dr. Hyder participated in --along with Etienne Krug from WHO--focused mainly on the use of data in reporting and the challenges this presents to journalists.

Dr. Hyder also participated in the Safekids Global Summit on September 30th, where he presented on the critical role of utilizing data to address childhood unintentional injuries.??

On October 1, JH-IIRU associate director, Kent Stevens, presented a session at the Road Traffic Injuries Research Network (RTIRN) Regional Workshop on trauma care in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), and Dr. Hyder, presented on capacity development for RTIs.

There’s more to come from the conference, so make sure to follow us on Facebook and Twitterto keep up with the latest JH-IIRU news out of New Zealand this week!

Safety 2012 World Conference on Injury Prevention is a biennial meeting that brings together world leaders in scientists, researchers and academics from all over the world in an effort to strengthen the field of injury prevention and safety promotion.

The Road Traffic Injuries Research Network (RTIRN) received the 2010 Prince Michael International Road Safety Award during the UN Road Safety Collaboration meeting in London this week. HRH Prince Michael of Kent presented the award to Margie Peden of the World Health Organization who is a board member for RTIRN, and Dr. Adnan Hyder, director of the Johns Hopkins International Injury Research Unit, who serves as board chairman for RTIRN.

The award, administered by Road Safe, recognizes important achievements and innovations in road safety. RTIRN’s vision is to reduce the burden of road traffic injuries in low and middle-income countries through the promotion, conduct and utilization of road safety research.

For more information on partnership opportunities, please contact the Johns Hopkins International Injury Research Unit.

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Margie Peden of the World Health Organization, HRH Prince Michael of Kent, and Dr. Adnan Hyder of the Johns Hopkins International Injury Research Unit

The Johns Hopkins International Injury Research Unit congratulates our partner, the Road Traffic Injuries Research Network, on receiving the prestigious 2010 Prince Michael International Road Safety Award. The award, administered by Road Safe, recognizes important achievements and innovations in road safety. It will be presented during the UN Road Safety Collaboration meeting in April to Dr. Adnan Hyder, director of the Johns Hopkins International Injury Research Unit. Dr. Hyder also serves as board chairman for the Road Traffic Injuries Research Network.

In addition, the Johns Hopkins International Injury Research Unit was featured in the Road Traffic Injuries Research Network’s first quarter newsletter, announcing the Unit’s designation as a World Health Organization Collaborating Center for Injuries, Violence and Accident Prevention.

For more information on partnership opportunities, please contact the Johns Hopkins International Injury Research Unit.

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Johns Hopkins International Injury Research Unit featured in the Road Traffic Injuries Research Network's newsletter.

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