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Johns Hopkins International Injury Research Unit

A World Health Organization Collaborating Center for Injuries, Violence and Accident Prevention

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Keyword: road safety

The Johns Hopkins International Injury Research Unit (JH-IIRU) and the Global Road Safety Partnership (GRSP), with support from Bloomberg Philanthropies, are delighted to jointly offer the new “Global Road Safety Leadership Course” (GRSLC). The two-week training program will take place this fall (Oct-Nov 2016) in Baltimore, Maryland. The course aims at building leadership capacity to design, advocate for, and implement effective road safety programs and policies. The GRSLC will include, among others, modules on the following topics:

  • Road safety management
  • Safer roads and mobility
  • Safer vehicles
  • Safer road users
  • Post-crash response
  • Advocating for road safety policy passage and implementation

There will be over 60 course participants from more than 15 different countries. In addition to their coursework, the participants will travel to New York City to visit Bloomberg Philanthropies, and Washington D.C. to visit the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA).

Key features of this program will include:

  • Active engagement among a wide variety of international participants from different settings and backgrounds, including government and civil society
  • Delivery of the program through a diverse, experienced international faculty who aim to challenge and inspire participants
  • Thematic emphasis on leadership across a range of road safety issues, irrespective of participants’ positions in their organizations
  • Certification from a leading university and global road safety set of partners

The goal of the course is to enhance effective leadership capacity to optimally address road safety in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) in order to reduce deaths and serious injuries around the world. 

On June 15 - 17, 2016, Johns Hopkins International Injury Research Unit’s Assistant Scientist, Dr. Connie Hoe, traveled to Santiago, Chile, to participate in the Second International Child Road Safety Forum (FISEVI). The event was organized by the Gonzalo Rodriguez Foundation and hosted by Chile’s National Traffic Commission and the Automobile Club of Chile. The main objective of the forum was to share knowledge, experiences, best practices and ideas related to road safety. The forum was opened by Andrés Gómez-Lobo, Minister of Transport and Telecommunications of Chile, and attended by more than 30 safety experts from around the world.

Connie Hoe
Photo courtesy of Gary Smith

Dr. Hoe participated in the “Public Policies Related to Road Safety” workshop with several other road safety experts from the National Road Safety Agency in Argentina, the National Road Safety Agency in Colombia, the National Road Safety Committee in Chile, the National Road Safety Unit in Uruguay, and the Gonzalo Rodríguez Foundation. She also served as a speaker for Pillar 1 – Road Safety Management where she highlighted the need for lead agencies that are empowered to implement good practice guidelines and coordinate road safety stakeholders. Dr. Hoe also discussed the importance of establishing and supporting data systems for on-going monitoring and evaluation of road safety in low- and middle-income countries.

To learn more about the forum, please click here.

Photo courtesy of Lorrie Walker
 Photo courtesy of Lorrie Walker

May is Global Youth Traffic Safety Month (GYTSM), and the Johns Hopkins International Injury Research Unit (JH-IIRU) supports the National Organizations for Youth Safety (NOYS) in their efforts to address the issue of road safety among young people. We encourage a worldwide conversation to call attention to road traffic fatalities not only in the United States, but around the world, especially in low- and middle-income countries, were nearly 95% of youth road traffic fatalities occur.

According to the World Health Organization’s (WHO) World report on child injury prevention, 2008, more than 260,000 children die as a result of road traffic crashes each year, with an estimated 10 million more sustaining non-life threatening injuries. Road traffic injuries (RTIs) are the global leading cause of death for children 15-19 years, and the second leading cause of death for children 5-14 years.  What’s more, RTI’s rank within the top 15 causes of disease burden worldwide for children under 14.

National Youth Global Youth Traffic Safety Month® (GYTSM) was formed in partnership with the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration to support the United Nations 2007 Global Road Safety Week.

To find out more about GYTSM, visit the NOYS site: http://www.noys.org/default.aspx

To read the WHO’s World report on child injury prevention, click here: http://www.who.int/violence_injury_prevention/child/injury/world_report/en/

To find out more about JH-IIRU’s global road safety work, visit our publication list here, as well as our special issues on the Bloomberg Philanthropies Global Road Safety Program: http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/gcpi20/13/sup1#.U3DLooFdXh4

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/journal/00201383/44/supp/S4

Recent studies have shown considerable undercounting of bicyclist mortality rates in police-reported data in China. Comparisons between the Ministry of Health’s vital registration data and the Disease Surveillance Points data (DSP) show significant disparity in rates from that of the official, police-reported rates.

JH-IIRU team members, including associate faculty Sai Ma and research assistant Qingfeng Li, recently published a study addressing this disparity in Injury Prevention. “Bicyclist mortality between 2006 and 2010 in China: Findings from national Disease Surveillance Points (DSP) data,” examines the trend in bicycle mortality using DSP data.

The study found that, between 2006 and 2010, the mortality rate for bicyclists increased from 1.1 to 1.6 per 100,000 population, according to DSP data, and more than 90% of bicyclist deaths were undercounted by police compared to DSP data during the same time period. However, because the police-reported statistics are regarded as the official data source, bicyclist injury and mortality rates may suffer from under-reporting.

This paper suggests the importance of using health sector data to compliment the reporting of traffic bicyclist injuries, as well as the need to improve police reports in China to more accurately reflect mortality rates.

These findings have several important policy implications: including health sector data can improve the quality of the data, as well as influence the implementation of interventions, such as promoting helmet use, mass media campaigns and legislation to curb the recent increase in mortality.

You can access the paper here: http://injuryprevention.bmj.com/content/early/2013/05/24/injuryprev-2012-040510.long

 

As part of the Bloomberg Philanthropies Global Road Safety Program, the Johns Hopkins International Injury Research Unit (JH-IIRU) and collaborators from the Middle East Technical University (METU) recently hosted a road safety training workshop in Ankara, Turkey.

The two-day workshop, “Monitoring and Evaluation Methods for Road Safety,” aimed to strengthen the in-country capacity for monitoring and evaluation of road safety programs in Turkey. The more than fifty attendees included members of the Turkish National Police, faculty members from several Turkish universities, and representatives from the Ministry of Health, as well as various health professionals from across Turkey.

JH-IIRU team member, associate scientist, Dr. Shivam Gupta and METU faculty member, Türker Özkan, lead two sessions, an introduction to program evaluation and a discussion on the indicators for road safety program evaluation. Other topics of discussion included data collection methodologies and key issues and applications of road policing. In addition to Dr. Gupta, JH-IIRU research assistant, Connie Hoe, was in attendance as well.

Additional workshop collaborators included the World Health Organization (WHO), Global Road Safety Partnership (GRSP) and the Association for Safe International Road Travel (ASIRT).

Gupta
Dr. Shivam Gupta

Hoe
JH-IIRU research assistant, Connie Hoe

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