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Johns Hopkins International Injury Research Unit

A World Health Organization Collaborating Center for Injuries, Violence and Accident Prevention

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Keyword: margie peden

On April 18th, as part of the effort to draw attention to the growing burden of road traffic injuries, the Johns Hopkins International Injury Research Unit (JH-IIRU) launched “Public Health Burden of Road Traffic Injuries: An Assessment from Ten Low- and Middle-Income Countries,” a special issue of Traffic Injury Prevention. A noontime seminar at the Bloomberg School of Public Health in Baltimore, which featured panelists from the World Health Organization (WHO) and the Global Road Safety Partnership (GRSP), two of the Road Safety in 10 Countries project consortium partners, marked the occasion.
Guest panelists Margie Peden from WHO and Gayle DiPietro from GRSP joined JH-IIRU Director Adnan Hyder and Senior Technical Advisor, David Bishai to announce the special issue, which highlights the work the RS-10 Project is doing.  This landmark publication includes 11 scientific papers jointly authored with 50 colleagues from JH-IIRU and their in-country collaborators that contribute much-needed new knowledge to the burgeoning issue of road traffic injuries in low- and middle- income countries.

L-R: Gayle DiPietro, Adnan Hyder, Margie Peden and David Bishai

Gayle DiPietro

Margie Peden

To read more about the event, click here.

To access the special issue of Traffic Injury Prevention, click

To find out more about the Johns Hopkins International Injury Research Unit and the Road Safety In 10 Countries Project, contact us at

Johns Hopkins International Injury Research Unit (JH-IIRU) director, Adnan Hyder, and colleagues from the World Health Organization, including health economist Dan Chisholm and coordinator of unintentional injuries, Margie Peden, recently published an article in the prestigious British Medical Journal, entitled "Cost Effectiveness of Strategies to Combat Road Traffic Injuries in sub-Saharan Africa and South East Asia: Mathematical Modelling Study." In it, the research team set out to identify and estimate population level costs of five intervention strategies for reducing road traffic injuries. 

Although there is wide variation across the globe in the way that roads are used and injuries are caused, the study attempted to understand the underlying patterns of road use and injury burden in order to estimate the potential impact of different road safety measures on the health of associated populations.

Dr. Hyder and his colleagues concluded that their findings, which maintain that a combination of strategies (e.g. the joint enforcement of speed limits, drink-driving laws and helmet use) are expected to be the most cost effective, can provide a useful analytical baseline against which more country-specific assessments can be made. This analysis can provide an important basis for decision making and resource allocation in global road safety.

Read the complete article

For more information on JH-IIRU's work in road safety, such as the Road Safety in 10 Countries project (RS-10),
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