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A World Health Organization Collaborating Center for Injuries, Violence and Accident Prevention

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Keyword: decade of action for road safety

 

On April 3, 2013, JH-IIRU director, Adnan Hyder and research assistant, Connie Hoe, attended the opening ceremony for the “Road Safety Platform of Turkey” in Ankara, Turkey. The event also marked the launch of the “Decade of Action for Road Safety 2011-2020” in the country.

Turkish Prime Minister, Recep Tayyip Erdo?an was honored at the ceremony by JH-IIRU, as well as other RS10 consortium partners, for his support of road safety in Turkey. Dr. Hyder presented him with a certificate of appreciation.  The Prime Minister pledged to continue the work in Turkey, suggesting more precautions against drunk driving in the country.

Also on hand for the ceremony were Road Safety in 10 Countries (RS10) consortium partners, including Dr. Etienne Krug, WHO Director, Violence and Injury Prevention and Disability, Ms. Rochelle Sobel, General Director of the Association for Safe International Road Travel (ASIRT), as well as the Turkish Minister of Health and Minister of the Interior.

For more information, click here.

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Dr. Adnan Hyder (right) presents Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdo?an, with a certificate of appreciation.

 

This week, two important global safety meetings will take place at the World Health Organization (WHO) headquarters in Geneva, Switzerland.  

The first will be to address effective coordination and implementation of activities for child injury prevention in low- and middle-income countries and the second will be to launch the Global Status Report on Road Safety 2013. The director of the Johns Hopkins International Injury Research Unit, Dr. Adnan Hyder, will be attending both.

As part of the UN’s Decade of Action for Road Safety 2011-2020, the Global Status Reports on Road Safety will serve as monitoring tools to measure the impact of the Decade on stabilizing and then reducing the level of road traffic deaths around the world.

 Road traffic injuries kill nearly 1.3 million people annually and if current trends continue, road crashes are predicted to become the fifth leading cause of death by 2030.

Follow Dr. Hyder on Twitter for live coverage of the events: https://twitter.com/ahyder1 and check our Twitter page for updates, too! https://twitter.com/HopkinsINJURIES.

And stay tuned for more in-depth coverage of the launch of the Global Status Report. 

In September 2011, the Sixty-sixth session of the United Nations General Assembly acknowledged Bloomberg Philanthropies’ donation of US$ 125 million to improve global road safety. This contribution has supported the implementation of a five-year project in 10 low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) to prevent road traffic injuries, which coincides with the Decade of Action for Road Safety 2011-2020. The multi-million dollar contribution is considered the largest donation to global road safety by far.The recipients of the donation represent a global consortium on road safety. Since 2009, The Johns Hopkins University International Injuries Research Unit (JH-IIRU) has partnered with five other international institutions: the World Health Organization, the World Bank Global Road Safety Facility, the Global Road Safety Commitment, EMBARQ - the World Resources Institute Center for Sustainable Transport, and the Association for Safe International Road Travel. To date JH-IIRU has closely monitored road safety interventions in each RS-10 country and collected several rounds of primary data as regards targeted risk factors: motorcycle helmet use, seatbelt and child restraint use, speeding and drunk driving.

On Wednesday, May 11, 2011, a series of events around the world marked the launch of the Decade of Action for Road Safety 2011-2020. The Johns Hopkins International Injury Research Unit was proud to join our partners in several of these events in Washington, DC, including the Decade of Action for Road Safety Expo and Congressional briefing.

The expo, organized by the National Organizations for Youth Safety, provided an opportunity for organizations to share information and materials related to global road safety.

The Congressional briefing, organized by the Association for Safe International Road Travel and the U.S. Congressional Caucus on Global Road Safety, featured remarks by Thomas Frieden, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Dr. Adnan Hyder, director of the Johns Hopkins International Injury Research Unit, and Stephen Hargarten, chairman of the Department of Emergency Medicine at the Medical College of Wisconsin.

The Decade of Action for Road Safety comes at a time of great promise and opportunity. Building on a solid foundation of research, and support from politicians, philanthropists and celebrities, the Decade is the culmination of years of collaboration and planning. It is also the start of an unprecedented worldwide partnership and commitment to reverse the trend in global road traffic crashes, make road safety a public health priority and save up to 5 million lives by 2020.

The Johns Hopkins International Injury Research Unit supports these important goals, most recently leading the evaluation effort for the Road Safety in 10 Countries project, a five-year initiative supported by Bloomberg Philanthropies.

For more information about the Unit’s work in road safety, please contact us.

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Thomas Frieden, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, speaks during the Congressional briefing on May 11.

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Stephen Hargarten, Cathy Silberman of ASIRT and Dr. Adnan Hyder address the audience during the Q&A portion of the briefing.

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Dr. Adnan Hyder answers questions for attendees during the briefing.

On May 11, the World Health Organization launched its global Decade of Action for Road Safety awareness campaign to build on the momentum of governments, industries, nongovernmental organizations and research institutions in preventing injuries from road traffic crashes. The Decade of Action aims to save 5 million lives from road traffic injuries over the next ten years.

Road traffic injuries are a global epidemic that reaches far and wide – from the busy streets of Baltimore to dimly lit alleys of Mumbai. More than two people die every minute on the world’s roads, which amounts to 1.3 million people every year. Although road traffic injuries have received little attention as a global public health problem, WHO predicts that road traffic injuries will become the world’s fifth leading cause of death by the year 2030.

Although the majority of these tragedies occur in low- and middle-income countries, the problem itself has no borders. According to the U.S. State Department, road traffic injuries are the top killer of healthy Americans traveling abroad. Here in the United States, motor vehicle crashes are the leading cause of death for people ages 5 to 34.

For years, research has focused on the benefits of road safety solutions and interventions around helmet wearing, speeding, drunk driving and seat belts. The Johns Hopkins International Injury Research Unit, whose faculty have been leaders in exploring the burden of road traffic injuries and potential interventions in developing countries, has made significant strides in these areas, most recently having joined the global community of World Health Organization Collaborating Centers. The Johns Hopkins International Injury Research Unit is also part of a the Road Safety in 10 Countries project, a five-year, $125 million initiative supported by Bloomberg Philanthropies that aims to improve road safety in 10 low- and middle-income countries.

The Johns Hopkins Center for Injury Research and Policy has a 25 year history of addressing road traffic injuries as a public health problem in the United States. Because of the Center’s emphasis on translation, the consequences of this research on practice and policy are considerable. For example, Center research demonstrated the significant reduction in crash risks as a result of stringent Graduated Driver Licensing (GDL) programs, information that has been used by state policymakers across the country to inform their novice driver policies. Center faculty were also among the first to demonstrate the safety impact of bicycle helmet laws and related education programs, and have developed programs designed to help senior drivers better self-regulate their driving, keeping them safer on the roads. Center programs also provide low-cost car safety seats to families in need.

For more information about the Bloomberg School’s continuing work in road safety, please contact the Johns Hopkins International Injury Research Unit and the Johns Hopkins Center for Injury Research and Policy.

*Click here to view this article on the Bloomberg School's website.

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