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Johns Hopkins International Injury Research Unit

A World Health Organization Center for Injuries, Violence and Accident Prevention

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Date: Jul 2014

Student Research Assistant: Road traffic injuries in Karnataka, India

Research Assistant (RA) is needed to assist in a project that will assess the health impacts of highway development in Karnataka, India. The RA will work closely with Dr Kavi Bhalla and Dr Krishna Rao to identify suitable data sources (hospitals, police, ambulance, etc), collect data, conduct analysis, and write project reports.

- Duration of project: 8 months (September 2014 - April 2015)

- The student must be fluent in Hindi or Kannada 

- The student must be able to be based in Karnataka for a 2 month period 

- The following are helpful but not essential: experience or coursework in burden of disease methods, road traffic injury research, measurement and evaluation

- Pay: $20/hour; 19 hours/week; 8 months.

Please send CV to kbhalla@jhsph.edu

For more information, please contact

Kavi Bhalla, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor
Leon Robertson Faculty Development Chair
Johns Hopkins International Injury Research Unit 
Department of International Health
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health
615 N. Wolfe Street, E8138
Baltimore, Maryland 21205
Phone: 954.849.8692

Email: kbhalla@jhsph.edu

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Student Research Assistant: Helmet testing and evaluation

 

Research Assistant (RA) is needed to assist in a project that aims to test the impact protection offered by helmets sold in Low- and Middle- Income countries. The RA will be expected to help in conducting experiments (helmet drop tests), and analyzing results.

- Duration of project: 1.5 year (August 2014 - December 2015)

- The researcher should feel comfortable performing basic statistical analysis as well as working with their hands in a laboratory setting. The student will be expected to run helmet drop tests under the supervision and guidance of other researchers.

- The following are helpful but not essential: experience or coursework in burden of disease methods, traumatic brain injuries research, measurement and evaluation

- Pay: $20/hour; 10 hours/week

Please send CV to kbhalla@jhsph.edu

For more information, please contact


Kavi Bhalla, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor
Leon Robertson Faculty Development Chair
Johns Hopkins International Injury Research Unit 
Department of International Health
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health
615 N. Wolfe Street, E8138
Baltimore, Maryland 21205
Phone: 954.849.8692

Email: kbhalla@jhsph.edu

Each year, the Global Emergency Medicine Literature Review (GEMLR) searches peer-reviewed and grey literature on emergency medicine to find the most important and upcoming research in the field.

This year, of the several thousand articles reviewed, “The cost of injury and trauma care in low- and middle-income countries: a review of economic evidence,” published in the journal Health Policy and Planning, was selected as one of the top global emergency medicine articles of 2013.

Written by JH-IIRU team members Hadley Wesson, associate director Abdul Bachani and director Adnan Hyder, as well as colleagues Nonkululeko Boikhutso and Karen J. Hofman, the paper suggests that while there is an urgent need to push injury prevention to the forefront of public health initiatives and to understand the costs associated with injury, there is a lack of injury-related economic evidence from LMICs. The paper goes on to summarize the body of economic evidence on injury in LMICs; assess the quality of cost-effectiveness studies using standard methods to highlight the role of economic data as a tool for injury-prevention advocacy; and provide recommendations regarding economic evaluations in LMICs.

“We are delighted to have one of our publications selected by GEMLR this year,” said Hyder. “Emergency medicine, especially in low-income settings, is vitally important and we hope this distinction will help guide policy makers when prioritizing public health funding and initiatives.

Formed in 2005, GEMLR seeks encourage the development of the field of emergency medicine globally by providing clear and accessible scientific literature. The review searches thousands of peer-reviewed and grey literature, and selects those of the highest quality to illustrate best practices and encourage additional research in the field of global emergency medicine.

Last month, Johns Hopkins International Injury Research Unit (JH-IIRU) team members traveled to Matlab, Bangladesh, for the Saving of Lives from Drowning (SoLiD) project, an implementation study established to test the effectiveness of interventions to prevent and reduce the burden of childhood drowning in Bangladesh.

JH-IIRU is working with two in-country collaborators, the Centre for Injury Prevention and Research (CIPRB) and the International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh (icddr,b), to test two interventions: community daycare centers (sometimes referred to as "crèches" or "Anchals") and playpens. Attendance in Anchals during the period when drowning injury is most likely to occur reduces the risk of drowning by both supervising the child and removing the child from the hazard. Similarly, playpens, which are being locally manufactured, restrict child mobility thus creating a barrier between the child and the hazard. They are also an aid to adult supervision, which in turn minimizes exposure to the risk of drowning. The interventions are being implemented along with family education and community awareness on drowning prevention.

Program manager and JH-IIRU assistant scientist Olakunle Alonge met with CIPRB and icddr,b to discuss progress on the rollout of the two interventions for the project, as well as the status of surveillance and compliance assessment data collection. The group was also there to review any challenges in both the field operation and data collection. JH-IIRU research associate, Siran He, was also on hand to participate in both household visits (for playpen observation and data collection monitoring) and visits to established Anchals. She also observed distribution of playpens and training for the Anchal Mas (on-site caregivers).

playpen
Playpen distribution demonstration.      

Dr. Alonge reports that the Anchal rollout is on track and CIPRB is set to enroll all eligible children and begin distribution of the wooden playpen on schedule; however, there were production delays with the plastic playpens. At icddr,b sites, surveillance data collection is going according to plan with collectors using Samsung tablets with a special SoLiD application that allows for efficient data collection and the instant uploading of information. The team was happy to report that collection is on track for all data streams, this includes surveillance data as well as compliance assessment data collection, which had previously been delayed.

worker with tablet
Surveillance worker with tablet.

creche song
An Anchal Ma leads children in song.

Dr. He reported that approximately 160 playpens were available for pickup at a venue in Matlab during the visit.  While there, mothers and/or caregivers were given a demonstration on how to assemble. In some cases, children were able to be put in playpens to test.  She also observed training for approximately 60 Anchal Mas in Matlab South site during the visit.

 boy in playpen
A young boy testing plastic playpen       

The goal of the project is to monitor and evaluate the effectiveness of these interventions for up to 80,000 children, 1-4 years of age over a two-year period. So far, about 40,000 children have been recruited into the study.

For more information on the project, click here.

On June 25 – 26, 2014, Johns Hopkins International Injury Research Unit (JH-IIRU) director, Adnan Hyder, and associate director, Abdul Bachani, participated in the Research Week 2014 Summit at the Universiti Putra (UPM) in Putrajaya, Malaysia. The two-day summit, organized by the Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences at the university, featured discussions ranging from clinical trials to responsible conduct of research. 

Dr. Hyder gave a plenary talk, “Global Road Safety: Evaluation Strategies in 10 Countries,” in which he discussed the work of the Bloomberg Philanthropies Global Road Safety Program.

Drs. Hyder and Bachani met with UPM leadership, including vice chancellor Dr. Mohd Ramlan, deputy vice chancellor Professor M. Nasir Shamdsudin and deputy dean of research, Dr. Zamberi Sekawi to discuss collaborations on projects such as child injuries in the home. They also met with longtime collaborator, Dr. Kulanthayan KC Mani from the Road Safety Research Center at UPM to discuss mutual collaborations.

Tahir Malaysia
Dr. Hyder (right) with Dr. Tahir (left), Director for the Institute for Public Health in Malaysia
Hyder UPM
Dr. Adnan Hyder speaks at the plenary session, Global Road Safety: Evaluation Strategies in 10 Countries
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