Skip Navigation

Johns Hopkins International Injury Research Unit

A World Health Organization Collaborating Center for Injuries, Violence and Accident Prevention

Bookmark and Share

News

Date: Nov 2012

According to the World Health Organization’s World Report on Disability, more than one billion people live with disabilities worldwide, the majority of whom reside in low- and middle-income countries. A significant percentage of those disabilities are caused by injuries, many of which are the result of road traffic crashes, falls, burns and acts of violence.

In 1992, the United Nations proclaimed 3 December of each year as International Day of Disabled Persons with the aim of promoting a better understanding about disability issues and increasing awareness of gains to be derived from the integration of persons with disabilities in every aspect of political, social economic and cultural life.

The Johns Hopkins International Injury Research Unit (JH-IIRU) understands that the growing burden of disability significantly affects the health and social impact of communities around the world. JH-IIRU is dedicated to identifying effective solutions to the burden of injuries and the resulting disabilities in low- and middle-income populations, influencing public policy and practice, and advancing the field of injury prevention throughout the world.

That is why JH-IIRU supports the United Nations’ Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, and believes the one billion people worldwide living with disabilities have the right to participate fully in their societies.

To find out more about the International Day of Disabled Persons, click here: http://www.un.org/disabilities/default.asp?id=1597

For more disability-related information:

Injury patterns in long-term refugee populations: a survey of Afghan refugees
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19276769

Unintentional injuries: magnitude, prevention, and control
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22224893

MENTOR-VIP: Piloting a global mentoring program for injury and violence prevention
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19474562

Patterns of pediatric injury in South Africa: an analysis of hospital data between 1997 and 2006
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22710788

Since 1999, November 25 has been designated by the United Nations as the International Day for the Elimination of Violence Against Women.

From intimate partner violence and sexual assault, to “honor killings” and female genital cutting, violence against women crosses every boundary. It is not limited to a particular culture, or region, or society.  According to World Bank data, women aged 15-44 are more at risk from rape and domestic violence than from cancer, car collisions, war and malaria.  

The Johns Hopkins International Injury Research Unit believes it is the right of every woman and girl to live a life free of violence. That is why we stand with the United Nations and the UNiTE to End Violence Against Women campaign to prevent and eliminate violence against women and girls in all parts of the world.

To find out more about UNiTE to End Violence Against Women, visit the website: http://endviolence.un.org/

Sunday, November 18, marked the World Day of Remembrance for Road Traffic Victims, a worldwide acknowledgement of the 1.3 million people killed annually by road traffic crashes and a call for action to address this global epidemic.

The Johns Hopkins International Injury Research Unit (JH-IIRU) offers its deepest sympathies to those most affected by road traffic crashes—not only those who have lost their lives, but to the 20-50 million who are severely or permanently injured as a result of road collisions—and we reassert our commitment to reducing the number of needless injuries and deaths on the world’s roads.

JH-IIRU is currently working with a consortium of partners on the Road Safety in 10 Countries project (RS-10), a five-year initiative that draws on support from Bloomberg Philanthropies to implement road safety solutions where they are needed most. While there is still much work to be done, JH-IIRU is dedicated to RS-10 and proud to join with global partners in this effort.

In addition, JH-IIRU is working with partners in low and middle income countries – such as Pakistan, South Africa, Uganda – to help build capacity and develop data systems to address the growing burden of road injuries. Through research, training and partnerships, JH-IIRU hopes fewer and fewer people around the world will become victims of road traffic injuries.

For more information on the World Day of Remembrance for Road Traffic Victims, visit the website: http://www.worlddayofremembrance.org/

For more information on the Road Safety in 10 Countries project, visit us at: http://www.jhsph.edu/research/centers-and-institutes/johns-hopkins-international-injury-research-unit/rs10.html

 

Since 1991, the total number of motor vehicles has more than doubled in Russia. But with rapid motorization comes an increase in road traffic injuries (RTIs). In 2009, there were more than 250,000 RTIs and more than 26,000 deaths resulting from RTIs.

Russia’s high instance of injuries from road traffic collisions has been attributed in part to low rate of seatbelt use (the estimates of which vary across the Federation from 15-33 percent). Previous research has shown the use of seatbelts is an important means of reducing the risk of death or serious injury in a crash by almost 50% for both drivers and front seat passengers and by 25% for rear seat passengers. Because of these statistics, the Russian federal government has taken steps to improve overall road safety and by extension, increase seatbelt wearing rates, by instituting programs such as the Federal Targeted Program for Ensuring Road Traffic Safety. Despite these efforts, there has been no study published in English to examine their impact.

It is for this reason that JH-IIRU team members, including affiliated faculty Sai Ma,  along with RS-10 consortium partners from Lipetsk State Technical University and the World Health Organization, recently published “Seatbelt and Child Seat Use in Lipetskaya Oblast, Russia: Frequencies, Attitudes, and Perceptions.” This article, the first study published in English, describes, in detail, the patterns of seatbelt use and attitudes among drivers and passengers toward seatbelt use in Russia.

As part of the Road Safety in 10 Countries project (RS-10), in 2012, JH-IIRU published “Public Health Burden of Road Traffic Injuries: An Assessment from Ten Low- and Middle-Income Countries,” a special issue of Traffic Injury Prevention. This landmark publication includes 11 scientific papers jointly authored with 50 colleagues from JH-IIRU and their in-country collaborators that contribute much-needed new knowledge to the burgeoning issue of road traffic injuries in low- and middle- income countries.

You can access the full article along with the entire special issue here.

To find out more about JH-IIRU and road safety, contact us at IIRU@JHSPH.edu

In 2009, Bloomberg Philanthropies launched the Road Safety in 10 Countries project, a five-year, $125 million effort to reverse global deaths and injuries from road traffic crashes.  The initiative is implementing 12 different road safety interventions in specific sites within 10 low- and middle-income countries.  As part of the project, which is the largest international road safety initiative undertaken to date, JH-IIRU has been tasked with monitoring and evaluating the interventions in all participating countries. Part of this responsibility includes examining the economic impact of the project, because, while it’s well-established that road traffic injuries (RTIs) are one of the leading causes of death and disability in the developing world, what is often overlooked is the economic cost of such a high burden of injury.

“Projecting the Health and Economic Impact of Road Safety Initiatives: A Case Study of a Multi-Country Project,” JH-IIRU senior technical advisor, David Bishai, along with colleagues from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, examined how many lives RS-10 can potentially save in selected sites, using two different economic approaches: Investment per life-years saved ($/LYS) and value of statistical life (VSL). $LYS calculations reflect traditional cost-effectiveness estimates. VSL calculations estimate how much society would be willing to pay to achieve the risk reductions promised by the RS-10 interventions.

The results of the study indicate that RS-10 benefits would have to be 20-fold less than those projected for its costs to outweigh the benefits and given such a high margin, it is very likely that RS-10 will be worth the money invested.

To read the full article and learn more about the methods used, click here: http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/gcpi20/13/sup1

As part of the Road Safety in 10 Countries project (RS-10), in 2012, JH-IIRU published “Public Health Burden of Road Traffic Injuries: An Assessment from Ten Low- and Middle-Income Countries,” a special issue of Traffic Injury Prevention. This landmark publication includes 11 scientific papers jointly authored with 50 colleagues from JH-IIRU and their in-country collaborators that contribute much-needed new knowledge to the burgeoning issue of road traffic injuries in low- and middle- income countries.

©, Johns Hopkins University. All rights reserved.
Web policies, 615 N. Wolfe Street, Baltimore, MD 21205