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The Next Stage of Prevention Science and Methodology:  A Festschrift in Honor of Dr. Sheppard G. Kellam

A Day of Leading Scientific Presentations on the Next Stage of Prevention Science


Thursday, March 20, 2008


Time: 8:30 am - 6:30 pm


Session I   8:30 – Noon:  Genes, Social Context, and Life Course Development

Session II   1:30 – 5:00 PM:  Going from Research to Practice with High Fidelity

Reception   5:00 – 6:30 PM

Location: Sommer Hall, The Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, 615 N. Wolfe Street, Baltimore, MD


MISSION OF THE FESTSCHRIFT
 

Major progress has been made in the field of prevention science over the last three decades.  Early risk and protective factors and developmental pathways leading to specific mental disorders and drug abuse have been identified and validated through longitudinal studies.  These specific risk and protective factors reside in the individual as well as in social fields of family, classroom and school, peer group, and in the broader community, social class, and cultural contexts.  There are now many rigorous randomized preventive trials that have confirmed that many of these early risk and protective factors can be modified by specific interventions, and that these produce beneficial outcomes throughout childhood and young adulthood.  Furthermore, many of these preventive interventions can be moved into practice when community-research partnerships are in place.  Advances in statistical designs, measurement, and analytical modeling have allowed us to carefully evaluate who benefits from an intervention, for how long, and under what circumstances.

At the same time, genetics and neurobiology have made enormous strides that now need to be integrated with the detailed knowledge that prevention science has developed regarding behavioral change in social contexts.  In addition, with the successes that prevention science has had with programs that prevent mental disorder and drug abuse as well as promote mental health, we now face the new challenge of moving these effective prevention programs into practice.   The task we now face is two-fold: 1) bringing the lessons of prevention science and genetics and neurobiology into a broader, richer shared scientific framework to organize and enhance knowledge of etiology and prevention, and 2) Bringing effective programs into practice with fidelity by institutionalizing programs within the natural cultural and institutional structures in which they must reside.  Today’s meeting is both a celebration of the progress and the laying of a base for the more integrated broader framework on which the next stage of work can be built.

Sponsored by:  

National Institute of Mental Health and National Institute on Drug Abuse

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health Center for Prevention & Early Intervention

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Department of Mental Health

Prevention Science and Methodology Group

American Institutes for Research

Robert Wood Johnson Foundation

Festschrift Chairs:

C. Hendricks Brown, Director, Prevention Science and Methodology Group and Professor, University of South Florida

Jeanne Poduska, Director, Center for Integrating Education and Prevention Research in Schools and Principal Research Scientist, American Institutes for Research

Nick Ialongo, Director, Center for Prevention & Early Intervention and Professor, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

William Eaton, Professor & Chair, Department of Mental Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

Festschrift Agenda

INTRODUCTORY REMARKS:  8:30 – 9:00 AM


William Eaton, Ph.D

Professor, Chair, Department of Mental Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health


SESSION I.  9:00 AM  – NOON


GENES, SOCIAL CONTEXT, AND LIFE COURSE DEVELOPMENT


Session Chair


Nicholas Ialongo, Ph. D.

Director, Center for Prevention & Early Intervention

Professor of Mental Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health


PRESENTERS


Judy L. Cameron, Ph. D.

Professor of Psychiatry, Neuroscience, and Cell Biology and Physiology, U of Pittsburgh

Senior Scientist - Oregon Regional Primate Research Center

Professor of Physiology and Pharmacology, Obstetrics and Gynecology, and Behavioral Neuroscience, Oregon Health & Science University


TITLE: The Role of Early Life Experience & Genetics in Shaping Anxious Behavior: Lessons from Nonhuman Primates and Implications for Prevention


Jenae Neiderhiser, Ph. D.

Professor of Psychology, The Pennsylvania State University.


TITLE: Contributions of Genetics to the Next Stage of Prevention Research and Contribution of Prevention Science to Genetics


Gene H. Brody, Ph. D. 

Regents Professor and Distinguished Research Professor of Child and Family Development, University of Georgia. Director of the Center for Family Research of the Institute for Behavioral Research


TITLE: Prevention Effects Moderate the Association of 5-HTTLPR and Youth Risk Behavior Initiation: GxE Hypotheses Tested via a Randomized Prevention Design


DISCUSSION PANEL

Stephen Suomi, Ph. D.

Chief of the Laboratory of Comparative Ethology at the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development. Research Professor at the University of Virginia, the University of Maryland, and the Johns Hopkins University

George R. Uhl, M.D., Ph.D.

Chief, Molecular Neurobiology Branch, National Institute on Drug Abuse, Associate Professor of Neurology, the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

Open Discussion

SESSION II.  1:30 – 5:00 PM

GOING FROM RESEARCH TO PRACTICE WITH HIGH FIDELITY


Session Chair, Jeanne Poduska, Sc. D.

Principal Research Scientist and Director, Center for Integrating Education and Prevention Research in Schools, American Institutes for Research

PRESENTERS

William MacFarlane, M.D.

Professor of Psychiatry, University of Vermont, Department of Psychiatry. Director of Research, Department of Psychiatry of Maine Medical Center and Spring Harbor Hospital 

TITLE: Prevention and Early Intervention for Schizophrenia in Communities

Patricia Chamberlain, Ph. D.

Senior Scientist, Center for Research to Practice, Senior Research Scientist, Oregon Social Learning Center

TITLE: Rigorous Testing of an Implementation Strategy for Evidence-Based Programs: Experience with the Multilevel Treatment Foster Care Program in California

C Hendricks Brown, Ph. D.

Professor of Epidemiology and Biostatistics and Director, Prevention Science and Methodology Group, University of South Florida

TITLE:  New Randomized Trial Designs for Evaluating Community Level Interventions: Examples from Implementing a Foster Care Program and Effectiveness of Suicide Prevention Programs

DISCUSSION PANEL

Patricia Welch, Ph.D.

Dean of the School of Education and Urban Studies, Morgan State University

Zili Sloboda, Sc.D.

Professor of Sociology and Senior Research Associate, Institute for Health and Social Policy, University of Akron. Founder and Current President, Society for Prevention Research

John B. Reid, Ph.D.

Executive Director, Center for Research to Practice. Senior Scientist, Oregon Social Learning Center

William T. Carpenter, Jr., MD

Professor of Psychiatry and Pharmacology, University of Maryland School of Medicine
Director, Maryland Psychiatric Research Center, Editor-in-Chief, Schizophrenia Bulletin   

Rico Catalano, Ph. D.

Professor and Director, Social Development Research Group, School of Social Work, University of Washington

OPEN DISCUSSION

RECEPTION   5:00 – 6:30 PM  FEINSTONE HALL (Short distannce down the hall from Sommer)

REGISTRATION

Registration is available on a first-come, first-served basis.

To register, please go t

http://commprojects.jhsph.edu/communications/Event_Signup.cfm?event_id=221

REFRESHMENTS

Coffee and soft drinks will be provided during breaks and wine and cheese during the reception, but you are on your own for lunch. Places to go for lunch will be discussed at the Festschrift.

DIRECTIONS

To retrieve 'door-to-door' driving directions, visit Mapquest and use the Bloomberg School of Public Health's postal address below.

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health
615 N. Wolfe Street, Baltimore, MD 21205

Recorded directions to the Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions are available by telephone at (410) 955-0166

East Baltimore Street Map http://www.hopkinshospital.org/directions/streetmap.html

Hospital Campus map http://www.hopkinshospital.org/directions/campusmap.html

Parking information is contained on the map.

From Washington, DC, and Virginia and from the I-95 access at Baltimore-Washington International Airport:

  • Take I-95 north to Exit 53 (I-395 north) into Baltimore. On the exit ramp, stay in the far left lane to proceed down the left fork that leads to the Inner Harbor (not towards Martin Luther King Blvd).
  • At the end of the exit ramp, proceed straight through 3 stoplights.
  • Move to the far right lane, preparing to turn right at the major intersection which is Pratt Street
  • Turn right onto Pratt Street.
  • Stay on Pratt Street for about 1.5 miles to Broadway; turn left on Broadway.
  • Stay on Broadway about 8 blocks until you reach Monument St.
  • Turn right onto Monument St.
  • Go straight to the second stoplight, which is Wolfe St.
  • The SPH building is the building at the southeast corner of Wolfe & Monument Streets (615 N. Wolfe St.).
  • Enter the SPH building on Monument Street between Wolfe and Washingon Streets

From Philadelphia, New York and Northeastern Baltimore Suburbs

  • Take I-95 south toward Baltimore to Exit 57 (O'Donnell Street)
  • Proceed west on O'Donnell approximately three-quarters of a mile to Conkling Street and turn right.
  • Follow Conkling to and turn left onto Eastern Avenue (west).
  • Continue on Eastern approximately two miles until Broadway;
  • Turn right on Broadway. Proceed north about 8 blocks until you reach Monument Street.
  • Turn right onto Monument St.
  • Go straight to the second stoplight, which is Wolfe St.
  • The SPH building is the building at the southeast corner of Wolfe & Monument Streets (615 N. Wolfe St.).
  • Enter the SPH building on Monument Street between Wolfe and Washingon Streets

From York, Central Pennsylvania and Northern Baltimore Suburbs

  • Take I-83 South (Harrisburg Expressway) into Baltimore (Note: I-83 becomes the Jones Falls Expressway as you approach Baltimore).
  • Exit at Fayette Street and turn left.
  • Take Fayette about 6 blocks to Broadway.
  • Turn left on Broadway and go a few blocks until you reach Monument Street.
  • Turn right onto Monument St.
  • Go straight to the second stoplight, which is Wolfe St.
  • The SPH building is the building at the southeast corner of Wolfe & Monument Streets (615 N. Wolfe St.).
  • Enter the SPH building on Monument Street between Wolfe and Washingon Streets

From Annapolis and Maryland's Eastern Shore

  • From Route 50, take I-97 toward Baltimore.
  • Follow I-97 to the Baltimore Beltway (I-695) toward Towson.
  • Take the Beltway to the Baltimore-Washington Parkway (I-295) North.
  • Follow I-295 into Baltimore (it becomes Russell Street).
  • Turn right at Pratt Street.
  • Stay on Pratt for about 1.5 miles to Broadway; turn left on Broadway.
  • Stay on Broadway about 8 blocks until you reach Monument St.
  • Turn right onto Monument St.
  • Go straight to the second stoplight, which is Wolfe St.
  • The SPH building is the building at the southeast corner of Wolfe & Monument Streets (615 N. Wolfe St.).
  • Enter the SPH building on Monument Street between Wolfe and Washingon Streets

From Frederick and Western Maryland

  • Take I-70 East to the Baltimore Beltway (I-695) south to I-95 North.
  • Take I-95 north to Exit 53 (I-395 north) into Baltimore. On the exit ramp, stay in the far left lane to proceed down the left fork that leads to the Inner Harbor (not towards Martin Luther King Blvd).
  • At the end of the exit ramp, proceed straight through 3 stoplights.
  • Move to the far right lane, preparing to turn right at the major intersection which is Pratt Street.
  • Turn right onto Pratt Street.
  • Stay on Pratt for about 1.5 miles to Broadway; turn left on Broadway.
  • Stay on Broadway about 8 blocks until you reach Monument St.
  • Turn right onto Monument St.
  • Go straight to the second stoplight, which is Wolfe St.
  • The SPH building is the building at the southeast corner of Wolfe & Monument Streets (615 N. Wolfe St.).
  • Enter the SPH building on Monument Street between Wolfe and Washingon Streets

Parking (Nearest to the Bloomberg School of Public Health)

·  Frequently, parallel street parking spaces can be can found on Washington and Wolfe streets. Some of these are metered spaces or free parking for up to 2 hours.

Garage Parking

·  From Monument St: Turn left onto Washington Street.  Just past the Washington/Monument St intersection, turn right into the Washington St. Garage.

·  From Broadway and coming from the south: Turn right onto Monument St.  Go 2 stop lights, then turn left onto Washington St.  The Washington St. Garage is immediately on your right.

·  From Washington St: Just past the Washington/Monument St intersection, turn right into the Washington St. Garage

Hotel Information

Listed Below is the information for 3 hotels located near the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health campus as well as a site for researching other hotels in Baltimore. You will have to pay for your transportation to the JHU campus (walk or get a cab). 

1. Henderson’s Wharf 1000 Fell Street, Baltimore, MD 21231 410-522-7777

Directions: http://www.hendersonswharf.com/directions/

2. The Admiral Fell Inn 888 South Broadway Baltimore, MD 21231 410-522-7377

Directions: http://www.tripadvisor.com/Hotel_Review-g60811-d124839-Reviews-Admiral_Fell_Inn-Baltimore_Maryland.html

3. Courtyard Baltimore Downtown / Inner Harbor  1000 Aliceanna St.  Baltimore, Maryland 21202 

1-443-923-4000

Directions: http://marriott.com/property/propertypage/BWIDT

Site for Researching Other Baltimore Hotels

http://www.tripadvisor.com/Hotels-g60811-Baltimore_Maryland-Hotels.html

Site for Researching Restaurants

http://yellowpages.baltimore.com/Restaurants.q.html

 

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