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Center for a Livable Future

 

October 6, 2011

Announcing 2011-12 CLF Predoctoral Fellows

The Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future (CLF) has awarded doctoral fellowships to 17 Johns Hopkins University students for the 2011–2012 academic year.  CLF’s Fellowship program was established to support outstanding doctoral students at Johns Hopkins University, who are committed to the discovery and/or application of knowledge about public health challenges of current food systems, and/or about creating a healthier and more resilient food system.

Recipients of CLF Doctoral Fellowships are: Patrick Baron, a first-year doctoral student in Environmental Health Sciences; Ann Carroll, a third-year doctoral student in Environmental Health Sciences; Ricardo Castillo, a third-year doctoral student in Epidemiology; Megan Clayton, a second-year doctoral student in Health, Behavior and Society; Meghan Davis, a fourth-year doctoral student in Environmental Health Sciences; Kevin Fain, a first-year doctoral student in Epidemiology; Jillian Parry Fry, a fifth-year doctoral student in Health Policy and Management; Jennifer Hartle, a third-year doctoral student in Environmental Health Sciences; Linnea Laestadius, a third-year doctoral student in Health Policy and Management; Lisa Lagasse, a third-year doctoral student in Health, Behavior and Society; Katherine Lee, a second-year doctoral student in Health, Behavior and Society; Melissa Poulsen, a second-year doctoral student in International Health; Sarah Rodman, a first-year doctoral student in Health Policy and Management; Supriya Shah, a second-year doctoral student in Health Policy and Management; Amber Summers, a fourth-year doctoral student in Health, Behavior and Society; Patti Truant, a second-year doctoral student in Health Policy and Management; and Shaohua Zhan, a sixth-year doctoral student in the Department of Sociology. 

Each CLF Doctoral Fellowship award provides one year of support to be used for tuition, stipend, and/or research expenses, depending on individual needs. Students enrolled in all divisions of Johns Hopkins University in PhD, ScD, or DrPH programs are eligible for support during any stage of their doctoral programs. The CLF Doctoral Fellowship Program, now in its ninth year, is made possible through the generous support of an anonymous donor.

Patrick BaronPatrick Baron, MPH, is a first-year doctoral student in the Department of Environmental Health Sciences. He received his Master of Public Health degree in Environmental Health Engineering from the Bloomberg School of Public Health in 2011. He is currently conducting research on worker and community health issues related to industrial food animal production. It is his goal to more fully characterize the link between antimicrobial use in industrial food animal production and the emergence of antimicrobial-resistant bacteria, and their related health impacts in human populations. His adviser is Dr. Peter Lees, Professor in the Department of Environmental Health Sciences.

Ann CarrollAnn Carroll, MPH, is a third-year part-time DrPH student in the Department of Environmental Health Sciences and is an employee of the United States Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Brownfields and Land Revitalization. She received her BS in biology from Virginia Tech and a Master of Public Health degree in Environmental Health from the Boston University School of Public Health. Her current interests include identifying ways urban agriculture can improve food security—particularly in urban “food deserts”—and support environmental protection and sustainable development. Her adviser is Dr. Paul Locke, Associate Professor in the Department of Environmental Health Sciences.

Ricardo CastilloRicardo Castillo, DVM, is a third-year PhD student in the Department of Epidemiology. He has a long-standing interest in the relationship between food animal production, human health and the environment. He is currently studying the role of hog industrial processing plants in the risk of transmission of MRSA (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus) of animal origin, from animals, to workers, to communities. He expects his research will inform policymakers about the danger of feeding farm animals with antibiotics. His advisers are Dr. Ellen Silbergeld, Professor in the Department of Environmental Health Sciences, and Dr. William Moss, Professor in the Department of Epidemiology. He is originally from Lima, Peru, where he received his DVM degree from San Marcos University.

Megan ClaytonMegan Clayton, MPH, is a second-year PhD student in the Department of Health, Behavior and Society. She received a BS in marketing and management from University of Virginia's McIntire School of Commerce and a Master of Public Health degree from the Bloomberg School of Public Health. Her goal is to complete research in methods for communicating with the public about the environmental impacts of food, as well as investigating health communication and social marketing approaches for influencing food purchasing and diet behaviors. Her adviser is Dr. Lawrence Wissow, Professor in the Department of Health, Behavior and Society.

Megan DavisMeghan Davis, DVM, MPH, is a fourth-year PhD student in the Department of Environmental Health Sciences. She is exploring the intersection of environmental health and infectious disease. Her research examines transmission of MRSA (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus) among people, animals, and the environments in which they live. Specifically, she is interested in pathogen exposures in communities sited near industrial agricultural facilities and the role of the household environment in dissemination of bacteria resistant to antibiotics. Dr. Davis holds a Doctor of Veterinary Medicine degree from the University of California at Davis School of Veterinary Medicine and a Master of Public Health degree from Bloomberg School of Public Health. Her adviser is Dr. Ellen Silbergeld, Professor in the Department of Environmental Health Sciences.

kevin fainKevin Fain, JD, MPH, is a first-year DrPH student in the Department of Epidemiology. He previously worked as an attorney at the FDA for 15 years, where he litigated cases for food and drug safety and counseled the agency on human and animal drug legal issues. His research interests include examining FDA’s regulation of animal drugs, particularly the agency’s risk assessment standards for animal drug residues in human food. He also aims to analyze the FDA’s regulation of animal and human drug use for antibiotic resistance.  He earned his MPH and Certificate in Risk Sciences and Public Policy at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health last year. His adviser is Dr. Carlos Castillo-Salgado, Associate Professor in the Department of Epidemiology.

jillian fryJillian Parry Fry, MPH, is a fifth-year PhD student in the Department of Health Policy and Management. She received her undergraduate degree in Bio-behavioral Health from the Pennsylvania State University and her Master of Public Health degree from the University of New Mexico. Current research interests include political factors that shape the regulation of intensive food animal production in the U.S., and how current regulations affect environmental justice issues. Her doctoral adviser is Dr. Robert Lawrence, Professor in the Department of Environmental Health Sciences. Her faculty adviser is Dr. Daniel Webster, Professor in the Department of Health Policy and Management.

jennifer hartleJennifer Hartle is a third-year doctoral student in the Department of Environmental Health Sciences. She is focusing her doctoral research on issues of food justice, exploring the connection between exposures to food-based environmental contaminants and socio-economic status. She seeks to apply her research findings to determine nutrition interventions and influence food policy, especially school-funded nutrition services. Ms. Hartle earned her BA in environmental science at the University of California, Berkeley, and her MHS in Environmental Health Engineering at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. She is also a Certified Industrial Hygienist and works to apply these years of experience to her research. Her doctoral adviser is Dr. Robert Lawrence, Professor in the Department of Environmental Health Sciences.

Linnea LaestadiusLinnea Laestadius, MPP, is a third-year PhD student in the Department of Health Policy and Management. She is examining government and non-governmental organization efforts to raise public awareness of the connection between meat and dairy consumption and climate change, as well as seeking to understand what factors may be preventing further action on this issue. Her research is focused on efforts in the U.S., U.K., and Sweden. Ms. Laestadius received a BA in Economics from American University and a Master of Public Policy degree from George Washington University. Her adviser is Dr. Shannon Frattaroli, Assistant Professor in the Department of Health Policy and Management.

Lisa LagasseLisa Lagasse, MHS, is a third-year PhD student in the Department of Health, Behavior and Society. Her research focuses on the communication of food system-related risks to human and environmental health. She is currently exploring Country of Origin Labeling as a means of communicating food safety information at the point of purchase. Ms. Lagasse received a BA in psychology from Simmons College, and an MHS from the Bloomberg School of Public Health. Her adviser is Dr. Katherine Clegg Smith, Associate Professor in the Department of Health, Behavior and Society.

Katherine LeeKatherine Lee, MA, is a second-year PhD student in the Department of Health, Behavior and Society. She is seeking to adapt a behavioral economics framework, particularly loss aversion framing, to investigate approaches to facilitate the translation of dietary intention into behavior, aided by periodic messaging. She previously worked on weight management clinical trials at the Stanford Prevention Research Center, researching behavioral strategies for long-term weight change. Katherine received her MA in sociology and pursued undergraduate studies in psychology and biology, at Stanford University.  Her doctoral adviser is Dr. J. Douglas Storey, Assistant Professor in the Department of Health, Behavior and Society and Director for Communication Science and Research at the Johns Hopkins Center for Communication Programs.

Melissa PoulsenMelissa Poulsen, MPH, is a second year PhD student in the Department of International Health. Her research interests center around increasing community resilience—both in the U.S. and in developing countriesto food insecurity in light of global environmental threats such as climate change and energy scarcity.  Ms. Poulsen received her undergraduate degree in biology from Carleton College in Minnesota and her MPH from the University of Michigan. Prior to beginning her doctoral program, she worked at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention implementing behavioral interventions to prevent HIV among youth in sub-Saharan Africa. Her faculty adviser is Dr. Peter Winch, Director of the Social and Behavioral Interventions Program in the Department of International Health.

Sarah RodmanSarah Rodman, MPH, is a first-year PhD student in the Department of Healthy, Policy and Management. Her main interest is the influence of power structures on U.S. food and agriculture policies that affect social justice. She is particularly curious about the corporate-political landscape around the formation of federal agriculture and food assistance policies. Since earning her MPH, Sarah has worked at the CLF on diverse food system issues, including Baltimore City food access. She received a BA in anthropology from the University of Chicago and a Master of Public Health degree from the Bloomberg School of Public Health. Her faculty adviser is Dr. Lainie Rutkow, Assistant Professor in the Department of Health, Policy and Management.

Supriya ShahSupriya Shah, MHS, is a second-year PhD student in the Department of Health Policy and Management. She earned her MHS at the Bloomberg School of Public Health in the Department of Environmental Health Sciences. She is interested in combining the different aspects of her background, including science, risk management, bioethics, and economics to develop policies for genetically modified plants and animals, particularly since genetic modification represents a new forefront in the field of agriculture and food policy. Ms. Shah hopes to be part of the process that focuses on creating transparent policies that reflect best scientific practices, as well as social and economic concerns. Her doctoral advisor is Dr. Mary Fox, Assistant Professor in the Department of Health Policy and Management.

Amber SummersAmber Summers, MHS, RD, is a fourth-year PhD student in the Department of Health, Behavior and Society. She earned a BS in human nutrition at Winthrop University in South Carolina. After completing a dietetic internship at the National Institutes of Health and the requirements to become a registered dietitian, Ms. Summers earned a Master of Health Sciences degree in clinical epidemiology at the Bloomberg School of Public Health. She has worked in the areas of weight management and cardiovascular disease prevention. Her dissertation research focuses on the use of meat alternatives in school meal programs. Her doctoral adviser is Dr. Janice Bowie, Associate Professor in the Department of Health, Behavior and Society.

Patti TruantPatti Truant, MPH, is a second-year PhD student in the Department of Health Policy and Management. Patti received a Master of Public Health degree from the Bloomberg School of Public Health in 2009, and returned to the school after a fellowship at the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). She received a BA in journalism from the University of Maryland, and has worked for the American Public Health Association and the Center for Science in the Public Interest. While working on her MPH, she worked as a research assistant for the CLF.  Her research interests include public health risk communication strategies and the broad health and environmental impacts of the food system and the built environment. Her adviser is Dr. Thomas A. Burke, Associate Dean for Public Health Practice and Training, and Professor in the Department of Health Policy and Management and the Department of Environmental Health Sciences.

Shaohua ZhanShaohua Zhan, MA, is a sixth-year PhD student in the Department of Sociology. He worked as a researcher at the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences (Beijing) between 2002 and 2006, where he studied rural poverty and rural-urban labor migration.  His PhD dissertation, based on fieldwork in rural China, explores whether Chinese rural development in the early reform period can be characterized as an "industrious revolution,” and the extent to which this experience provides an alternative model for creating a resilient and sustainable food system and for the reduction of poverty in countries facing serious population pressure and resource scarcity. His advisers are Dr. Beverly Silver, Professor in the Department of Sociology, and Dr. Joel Andreas, Associate Professor in the Department of Sociology.