Skip Navigation

Center for a Livable Future

 
FOOD FRONTIERS
1:34:19
May 3, 2016
Food Frontiers showcases six projects from around the United States that are increasing access to healthy food in varied ways – from a pioneering farm-to-school project to creative supermarket financing to cooking classes in a doctor’s office and a teen-managed grocery store. This 36-minute documentary film – produced by the Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future – is part of the FoodSpan curriculum, which provides an overview of the food system for high school students. http://www.foodspanlearning.org

5:37
May 15, 2017
Researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health’s Center for a Livable Future calculated the nutritional value of food wasted in the U.S. at the retail and consumer levels, shining a light on just how much protein, fiber and other important nutrients end up in the landfill in a single year. These lost nutrients are important for healthy diets, and some — including, dietary fiber, calcium, potassium and vitamin D — are currently consumed below recommended levels. Nutrient-dense foods like fruits, vegetables, seafood and dairy products are wasted at disproportionately high rates. Previous research estimated that as much as 40 percent of food is wasted nationally, but it wasn’t clear before this study how nutritious that food was. While not all wasted food is consumable, a sizeable amount is, leaving researchers and policymakers looking for ways to minimize the amount of good food that gets tossed as millions of Americans go hungry, do not get enough nutrients or do not have access to healthy food options. The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) and Environmental Protection Agency have set a goal of reducing food waste by 50 percent by 2030. The findings will appear online May 15 in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. “Huge quantities of nutritious foods end up in landfills instead of meeting Americans’ dietary needs,” says study lead author Marie Spiker, MSPH, RD, a CLF-Lerner Fellow at the Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future and a doctoral candidate in the Bloomberg School's Department of International Health. “Our findings illustrate how food waste exists alongside inadequate intake of many nutrients.” For their study, the researchers calculated the nutritional value of the retail- and consumer-level food waste of 213 commodities in 2012, using data from the USDA’s Loss-Adjusted Food Availability data series. The research team, looking at 27 nutrients in all, found that food wasted in the U.S. food supply that year contained 1,217 calories, 33 grams of protein, 5.9 grams of dietary fiber, 1.7 micrograms of vitamin D, 286 milligrams calcium and 880 milligrams potassium per person, per day. Nutrient loss estimates provided by this study could contribute to a baseline for measuring future progress, the authors say. The study also highlights how the amount of nutrients lost to waste compares to nutritional deficits in the typical American diet. For example, dietary fiber is important for maintaining digestive health and is found in grains, vegetables and fruits. Researchers estimate that, in 2012, food wasted each day contained upwards of 1.8 billion grams of dietary fiber, which is comparable to the full recommended intake for dietary fiber for 73.6 million adult women. American women under-consumed dietary fiber by 8.9 grams per day in 2012. The study found that the daily amount of wasted dietary fiber is equivalent to the amount needed to fill this nutritional gap for as many as 206.6 million adult women. Many factors contribute to food waste at both the retail and consumer levels, including the disposal of food due to aesthetic standards, large portion sizes, and management of perishables in fridges and pantries. There is currently great energy around efforts to address the waste of food. Preventing waste at the source is considered to be the optimal approach. Strengthening food recovery efforts that bring surplus food to food banks and pantries is also an important area of effort, innovation and impact. “This study offers us new ways of appreciating the value of wasted food. While not all food that is wasted could or should be recovered, it reminds us that we are dumping a great deal of high quality, nutritious food that people could be enjoying,” says Roni Neff, PhD, an assistant professor in the Bloomberg School’s Department of Environmental Health and Engineering who oversaw the study and directs the CLF’s Food System Sustainability & Public Health Program. “We should keep in mind that while food recovery efforts are valuable, food recovery doesn’t get to the heart of either the food insecurity problem or the waste problem. We need strategies addressing these challenges at multiple levels.” “Wasted Food, Wasted Nutrients: Nutrient loss from wasted food in the US and comparison to gaps in dietary intake” was written by Marie L. Spiker, Hazel A. B. Hiza, Sameer M. Siddiqi and Roni A. Neff. This research was funded by the GRACE Communications Foundation. M. L. Spiker and S. M. Siddiqi were also supported by the CLF-Lerner Fellowship. http://www.jhsph.edu/research/centers-and-institutes/johns-hopkins-center-for-a-livable-future/news-room/News-Releases/2017/wasted-food-means-wasted-nutrients.html
 
2:10:54
December 16, 2016
Keeve Nachman, Jillian Fry and Yukyan Lam of the Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future present the findings of their recent report, “Industrial Food Animal Production in Low- and Middle-Income Countries”, and look to the future for the next steps public health researchers, practitioners and funders can take.
 
5:56:51
December 15, 2016
Wendell Berry, award-winning author, poet and farmer from Port Royal, Kentucky, discusses his vision of an authentic land economy. The present economy, he explains, is rife with constraints and incentives that favor bad work. The consequence of this system is that we waste fertility. In other words, the land, if treated well, will give us so much, but we squander it, sometimes against our better judgment because our current economy favors waste. December 8, 2016 – 17th Annual Dodge Lecture.
 
5:59:06
December 15, 2016
Author, poet, writer and farmer Wendell Berry, in a public conversation with journalist Eric Schlosser, discusses his influences as a writer, his influences as a spiritual person, his connection to Kentucky, the land and more. He begins the conversation with Schlosser by talking about a term he’s coined—industrial fundamentalism—and continues to talk about the agrarian way of life and how to proceed in this new political era.
 
3:30:36
May 17, 2016
Michael Twitty helps us all reclaim the oft-forgotten African roots of Southern cooking — Afroculinaria, he calls it. He is a scholar of food and cooking, but he is also not afraid to expose his own raw emotions that are evoked when he visits Southern plantations to cook in the same kitchens where enslaved people once cooked.
 
47:56
May 16, 2016
Food Frontiers showcases six projects from around the United States that are increasing access to healthy food in varied ways – from a pioneering farm-to-school project to creative supermarket financing to cooking classes in a doctor’s office and a teen-managed grocery store. This 36-minute documentary film – produced by the Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future – will be part of the Foodscape online curriculum to be released in August 2016, which provides an overview of the food system for high school students.
 
0:00
May 9, 2016
For this event, the Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future (CLF) recruited an all-star cast of five Baltimore area food system players – a food czar, a community advocate, a clergyman/activist, an environmental journalist and a chicken farmer. Our five guests told tales of their food system travels and their collaborations with Johns Hopkins researchers on matters such as healthy food production and food justice. The event was CLF’s contribution to celebrating 100 years of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Polly Walker Ecology Fund The Polly Walker Ecology Fund was established at the Center for a Livable Future in November 2008 to honor Polly Walker, CLF’s first Associate Director, and to increase our understanding and application of the essential ecological perspective first promoted by Sir Albert Howard in 1939: “The whole problem of health in soil, plant, animal, and man is one great subject.” The Fund supports bringing distinguished ecologists to the Center for a Livable Future and Johns Hopkins University, enables students at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health to conduct research projects and advocacy activities focusing on ecologic issues, and supports faculty in exploring new dimensions of the ecology of soils, water and air that advance the mission of the Center. The Polly Walker Ecology Fund is supported by an anonymous donor and longtime friend of the Center.
 
1:34:19
May 3, 2016
Food Frontiers showcases six projects from around the United States that are increasing access to healthy food in varied ways – from a pioneering farm-to-school project to creative supermarket financing to cooking classes in a doctor’s office and a teen-managed grocery store. This 36-minute documentary film – produced by the Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future – is part of the FoodSpan curriculum, which provides an overview of the food system for high school students. http://www.foodspanlearning.org
 
1:51:15
April 27, 2016
The Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future and the Chesapeake Foodshed Network welcome Raychel Santo, Claire Fitch, Colleen Synk, Colleen McKinney, and Jose Oliva to speak on regional, environmentally sustainable, just, and humane practices in institutional food procurement. This webinar provides an overview of the Center for a Livable Future’s recent report, Instituting Change, which examines the benefits and barriers to increased institutional procurement of regionally and sustainably produced food. It also discusses a recent analysis of the economic potential for regional food procurement among institutions in the Chesapeake region. Finally, the webinar presents the policies and implementation of the Center for Good Food Purchasing’s standards.
 
6:10:12
March 29, 2016
The Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future and the Chesapeake Foodshed Network welcome Mark Winne, Senior Advisor for the Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future, Kathy Green, Senior Director of Advocacy and Public Policy for Capital Area Food Bank of Texas and Chair of Austin Travis County Food Policy Board, and Pam Roy, Executive Director of Farm to Table and Director of New Mexico Food and Agriculture Policy Council to discuss effective policy actions. Explore opportunities to build public support for your policy proposal and discover how to garner interest from key decision makers.
 
6:06:57
March 9, 2016
The Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future and the Chesapeake Foodshed Network welcome Harvard Food Law and Policy Clinic to share their expertise on the legal concepts of local food systems. Learn about the legal, regulatory and administrative levers that can be used to achieve effective policy change and explore emerging food policy issues being addressed by food policy councils across the nation.
 
8:23
February 19, 2016
Robert Lawrence, MD, Founding Director, Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future and Professor of Environmental Health Sciences at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health discusses how a simple dietary change can make a lasting impact on individual health and the health of the planet.