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Center for a Livable Future

 
BFED - Baltimore Food Ecology Documentary
27:52
April 16, 2013
CLF teamed up with the Video and Film Arts Department at the Maryland Institute College of Art (MICA) to produce BFED: Baltimore Food Ecology Documentary film in 2010, which explore important issues in our food system. It provides an in-depth look at the Baltimore food system. It tells this story through the eyes of numerous players, including a food warehouse worker, a grocery store owner, a local food historian, and activists trying to improve access to food in their schools and communities. Nine MICA students spent a school year working with their professor, Hugh Pocock, on BFED. CLF's staff provided technical support to the students, helping them refine their research goals and identify key informants to interview. The students' journey through their local food system -- where supermarkets are scarce and diet-related diseases common -- was an investigation of why the food system comes up short for many city residents. In the end, they find hope for a brighter food future in some unexpected places.

1:03:54
May 22, 2014
Richard J. Jackson, MD, MPH, FAAP, a professor of environmental health at UCLA, works with home builders and developers who want to design homes and communities with health in mind. Dr. Jackson gave the 14th annual Edward & Nancy Dodge Lecture on May 9, 2014. The event was sponsored by The Center for a Livable Future and the Department of Environmental Health Sciences at the Johns Hopkins School of Public Health.
 
12:43
May 21, 2014
Author Robert K. Musil, president of the Rachel Carson Council, recently published "Rachel Carson and her Sisters: Extraordinary Women who have Shaped America's Environment." He discusses Carson's legacy and her impact as someone who married science and political advocacy, while also helping to bridge the conservation and environmental health movements. He also introduces us to Sandra Steingraber, one of the many women scientists who has picked up on Carson's legacy and carried it forward.
 
2:24
May 15, 2014
Richard J. Jackson, MD, MPH, FAAP, a professor of environmental health at UCLA, works with home builders and developers who want to design homes and communities with health in mind. Dr. Jackson gave the 14th annual Edward & Nancy Dodge Lecture on May 9, 2014. The event was sponsored by The Center for a Livable Future and the Department of Environmental Health Sciences at the Johns Hopkins School of Public Health.
 
7:19
April 30, 2014
The Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future has been applying big-picture thinking to the food system since 1996, and has been educating the public, policymakers and advocates on key food system issues. The Center has focused on issues such as the overuse of antibiotics in agriculture and the resulting increase in antibiotic-resistant organisms, the public health risks of arsenic in some agricultural antibiotics, and the "food desert" phenomenon whereby some communities cannot easily access healthy foods. The Center funds research on these and other food system issues, and also tries to translate its research findings into policy. It often partners with impacted communities to both conduct the research and disseminate the findings.
 
59:36
April 16, 2014
Robert K. Musil, PhD, MPH is the President and CEO of the Rachel Carson Council, the legacy organization envisioned by Rachel Carson and founded in 1965 by her closest friends and colleagues. Dr. Musil was named President and CEO in February, 2014 and is only the third head of this historic environmental group. Musil is also a Senior Fellow and Adjunct Professor at the Center for Congressional and Presidential Studies, School of Public Affairs, American University, where he teaches about climate change and American environmental politics. He also has been a Visiting Scholar at the Churches' Center for Theology and Public Policy, Wesley Theological Seminary, where he taught about religious responses to global warming and security threats. From 1992-2006, Dr. Musil was the longest-serving Executive Director and CEO of Physicians for Social Responsibility (PSR), winner of the 1985 Nobel Prize for Peace. During his tenure, he nearly tripled PSR's membership, budget, and staff. He is a graduate of Yale and Northwestern Universities and the Johns Hopkins School of Public Health and has been a Visiting Honorary Fellow at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine and of Pembroke College, Cambridge University. Dr. Musil received an honorary Doctor of Humane Letters (LHD) from Mitchell College and joined their Board of Trustees in 2009. In spring 2011, Dr. Musil was also awarded an honorary Doctor of Science (Sc.D.) at Lincoln Memorial University. A Woodrow Wilson Foundation Visiting Fellow since 2006, he is widely sought as a campus and civic lecturer. Dr. Musil has also taught at Northwestern, Temple, St. Joseph's and LaSalle Universities.
 
41:41
February 12, 2014
On Wednesday, January 29, Conner Bailey gave a guest lecture at the CLF Aquaculture Series at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. A rural sociologist from Auburn University, Professor Bailey spoke about "Aquaculture, Ecology, and International Public Health." Sharing stories and insights from his years in South Vietnam and the U.S., he drew attention to the potential harms associated with intensive, or industrial-scale, aquaculture, in which the most popular species are salmon, shrimp, and catfish. "There are choices and decisions to be made whenever we invest in an activity," he said, cautioning about the resource conflicts around water use and the broader geopolitical consequences of, for example, farming shrimp in a desert. "You have to ask yourself what happens upstream. You have to think about agricultural runoff, stormwater runoff, industrial discharges. You have to ask where that water's coming from." Professor Bailey also cautioned about other problems associated with intensive aquaculture, namely fish disease, the introduction of exotic species in non-native habitats, and the pillaging of fish low on the food chain (such as menhaden) to feed carnivorous fish (such as salmon) in farms. Another concern he addressed was the trend by which fish, or "high-value animal protein," moves from the global south to the global north because of market forces. The global south, he said, may already be at a protein deficit and now it is exporting its home-grown protein to rich countries. In closing, Professor Bailey said, "I'm an optimist. I believe that aquaculture has the potential to feed everyone around the world. But we have the opportunity to shift our focus away from high-end consumer goods toward smaller scale production....Where we should go is small ponds and backyard ponds, especially in the developing world, where small scale fits into the economy." www.jhsph.edu/clf
 
1:07:52
January 17, 2014
Michael Taylor, deputy commissioner for foods and veterinary medicine at the Food and Drug Administration, addressed a Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health audience in December 2013, two days after the publication of FDA's Guidance for Industry #213. The event was cosponsored by the Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future and the Center for Law and the Public's Health.
 
8:05
January 14, 2014
The Center for a Livable Future Aquaponics Project at the Cylburn Arboretum is an experimental and educational project that is testing the sustainability of aquaponics and increasing awareness of this food production system. Aquaponics is a combination of aquaculture (fish farming) and hydroponics (soilless plant farming). It utilizes fish wastewater as a resource by circulating it through hydroponic grow beds where plants take up its nutrients. This differs from conventional closed-system aquaculture where fish wastewater is treated using various types of bio-filtration and then either returned to the fish-rearing tanks or discarded. In aquaponics, a symbiotic relationship is formed between fish and plants. The fish provide most of the plants' required nutrients and the plants clean the water for the fish. For more information... Visit the CLF Aquaponics blog: http://www.livablefutureblog.com/category/aquaponics-2 Visit the project website: http://www.jhsph.edu/clf/aquaponics Music can be found here: http://freemusicarchive.org/music/zmi/Consciousness_Dr/02_fall_in_-_zmi
 
1:30:36
October 28, 2013
The Symposium event celebrated the 10-year anniversary of the Meatless Monday campaign and a decade of effective collaboration with the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health as scientific advisor. Many JHSPH faculty members joined in panels with marketing experts from the Monday Campaigns to discuss and share the latest research on the impacts of a high meat diet and the behavior change principles behind the success of Meatless Monday.
 
1:23:00
May 21, 2013
"There can be no food justice without social justice," says Malik Yakini, the founder and executive director of the Detroit Black Community Food Security Network during the Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future 13th Annual Dodge Lecture. Addressing the broken food system, sharp class division, and the imbalance of policies that benefit the rich, he stated his position clearly: capitalism is not a good system for human beings. "In the food movement, nothing is more important than justice and equity," he said. http://www.jhsph.edu/research/centers-and-institutes/johns-hopkins-center-for-a-livable-future/news_events/dodge_lecture/malik.html http://www.jhsph.edu/clf
 
27:52
April 16, 2013
CLF teamed up with the Video and Film Arts Department at the Maryland Institute College of Art (MICA) to produce BFED: Baltimore Food Ecology Documentary film in 2010, which explore important issues in our food system. It provides an in-depth look at the Baltimore food system. It tells this story through the eyes of numerous players, including a food warehouse worker, a grocery store owner, a local food historian, and activists trying to improve access to food in their schools and communities. Nine MICA students spent a school year working with their professor, Hugh Pocock, on BFED. CLF's staff provided technical support to the students, helping them refine their research goals and identify key informants to interview. The students' journey through their local food system -- where supermarkets are scarce and diet-related diseases common -- was an investigation of why the food system comes up short for many city residents. In the end, they find hope for a brighter food future in some unexpected places.
 
44:38
December 13, 2012
Description: Allison Righter, MSPH, RD, Eating for the Future Program Officer, was invited to give a continuing education webinar about Meatless Monday to Registered Dietitians through the Public Health and Community Nutrition Dietetic Practice Group of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. This webinar, performed on two separate occasions in November and December 2012, reached over 430 dietitians in diverse practice settings across the country. While continuing education credits are no longer available for watching this recorded version, it is a great resource for dietitians and other health professionals.