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Keyword: vaccines

GUEST BLOGGER

Matt Coles

MattColesMatt Coles serves as the Senior Program & Contract Analyst for IVAC. Prior to IVAC, he worked for the National Foundation for the Centers for Disease Control & Prevention and served as a US Peace Corps Volunteer in West Africa from 2000-2003.

This post is part of the #ProtectingKids blog series. Read the whole series here.PATH2015_BlogSeries

By: Matt Coles

This is not a not a sports article, I promise.  On Sunday, February 1st, millions of people tuned into the Super Bowl to watch the New England Patriots and Seattle Seahawks duke it out, including an incredible 4th quarter catch by Jermaine Kearse of the Seahawks and a goal line interception by Malcolm Butler to clinch the Patriots win.  One of my passions is football, but I was unable to watch the last quarter of that game.  Our three month old son was having trouble breathing.

As a parent, there are two situations in which you always take your child to the hospital – when their fever is over 100°or they are having trouble breathing.  The cough started small on Friday and only worsened over the weekend.  Finally, on Sunday night, we made the decision to head to the hospital.  My wife hurriedly made her way to the hospital, trying to beat the snow that was coming down, while I stayed back to call the neighbors to watch our daughter, who was fast asleep. 

MattsBaby
Matt's baby in the hospital

Later at the hospital, we discovered our son had Respiratory Syncytial Virus, or RSV.  This is a virus that affects breathing and, in infants, secondary infections such as bronchiolitis and pneumonia can make it more serious.  According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), almost all children will have an RSV infection by their 2nd birthday.  Here in the United States, approximately 100,000 - 126,000 infants and children under the age of two are hospitalized from RSV.

RSV was new to us and, aside from short-acting prophylaxis for at-risk children, there is no vaccine on the market to prevent RSV.

I am well-informed about respiratory infections in children such as pneumonia, whooping cough, influenza, croup, and Hib.  I’m very fortunate to work at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and its International Vaccine Access Center (IVAC) – a place where I can ask my colleagues questions on childhood diseases, both from an academic and parental standpoint. Not all parents are this lucky.

As parents, we sometimes question our decisions for our children, especially when they get sick.  Should we have called the pediatrician earlier?  Will the medicine work?  Will the fever break?  It goes with the territory.

One thing we do not question is the benefits of vaccines.  I have seen firsthand the benefits of vaccines in The Gambia, where I served as a Health Volunteer with the Peace Corps from 2000-2003.  During my Peace Corp service, I worked with the Ministry of Health National Immunization Days for Polio.  We went house to house helping to vaccinate children with the oral polio vaccine (OPV) and providing Vitamin A supplementation for infants during week-long vaccine campaigns.  More than a decade later, our son’s brief battle with RSV only helped to reinforce the value I place on vaccines and the need for more, effective vaccines.

When we came home from the hospital, we also had to do breathing treatments four to five times a day to continue to loosen the mucus.  There were some sleepless nights that week, but we got through it.  The cough dissipated and like the Patriots victory, my family was also able to celebrate duking it out with RSV.  The victory photo says it all...

MattsBaby2

This post is part of the #ProtectingKids blog series. Read the whole series here.PATH2015_BlogSeries

GUEST BLOGGER

Huma Khawar

Huma Khawar is a freelance journalist and IVAC advocacy and communications consultant working in close coordination with the Expanded Programme on Immunization (EPI) in Pakistan.

By: Huma Khawar

“I don’t have any children of my own, but after 12 years as a lady health worker (LHW) all the children here in my village are my own children,” she explains as we sit together in a small village 150 kilometers outside Pakistan’s capitol of Islamabad. Rukhsana is a young woman in her early thirties with a distinct mission and a packed schedule. She is one of over 100,000 LHWs that go door-to-door every day to educate families – particularly women of child-bearing age – on health topics such as pregnancy, nutrition, hygiene, family planning, and immunization.

In Pakistan, LHWs play an integral role in providing essential health services to communities, especially in rural areas that are difficult to reach. According to local medical experts, the households visited by LHW have 15% more fully-immunized children than households that are outside the LHW catchment area. This is an important outcome as Pakistan is one of three countries that contributes nearly half of the 21.8 million children worldwide that did not receive routine immunization services and where outbreaks of childhood vaccine-preventable diseases, such as measles, are common.

Rukhsana recently earned her official certification as a LHW. She regularly leads immunization sessions, where she vaccinates children and provides basic health care. “When the vaccinator announces their arrival in an area every month, I go door-to-door to bring out children that are due for their shots. I encourage the remaining children to go to the nearest health center so they do not delay their immunization,” Rukhsana reports. “But still, some families hide their children or say that they are visiting relatives in adjoining villages,” she shares openly. These ploys do not deter Rukhsana, who accepts the challenge and is determined to improve the well-being of women and children in her own village.

Pakistan_LHW

She does admit, however, that misconceptions about vaccines are pervasive. “Some parents argue that the injection gives their children fever. I tell them these are common side effects that can be treated with 1-2 doses of pain killers. I give them paracetamol,” Rukhsana shares. She feels that arguments, refusals, and misconceptions can be countered with education and appropriate interventions.

Rukhsana distinguishes herself as a LHW because she establishes excellent rapport with community members. She often pleads with elders who are reluctant to vaccinate their children. “I make sure that all children in my villages are vaccinated,” she states proudly.

Rukhsana reaches 15-20 households each day. This year, Pakistan will provide specialized training for 14,000 LHWs on vaccine administration. It is no doubt that LHWs form the backbone of basic health care for this country and will be instrumental in administering vaccines that are a foundation for protection throughout a child’s life. Vaccines help children grow to reach their full potential.

With her shawl covering her gentle frame, leaving only her eyes to be seen by those she encounters, and a black bag of basic medicines resting comfortably on her shoulder, Rokhsana walks out of her home today, ready to tackle her first visit for the day, feeling ever confident to meet with all the families on her list.

Huma Khawar is based in Pakistan and works for the International Vaccine Access Center (IVAC) at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Support for this project was provided by Gavi, The Vaccine Alliance, for the Vaccine Implementation Technical Assistance Consortium (VITAC). The views expressed by the author does not necessarily reflect the views of Gavi and/or VITAC partners.

This post originally appeared on the Nigeria Health Watch and is cross-posted here with permission.

By Chizoba Wonodi

Nigeria launched the introduction of the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV)into its childhood immunization schedule in Lokoja, on December 22nd 2014. PCV prevents one of the deadliest bacterial causes of pneumonia, meningitis, blood infections and middle ear infections in children. Before now, only parents with the means could afford to vaccinate their children for thousands of naira in private clinics. But now, government is offering it for free to all kids. This is a big deal, so get excited!

PCV_launch_Nigeria

 Launch of PCV Vaccination in Lokoja

A journey that began 6 years ago has finally come to a successful end. But it was not an easy ride. As I think about the road to this introduction, I remember all the twists and turns along the way and marvel at the tenacity and perseverance of the chief actors in this story.

In 2008, I was working for a Johns Hopkins project called PneumoAdip, which was set up to accelerate the introduction of PCV into African and Asian countries. You may wonder why anyone needs a project to do that, right? Well, it turns out that having a vaccine that works is not enough to get countries to use it, unless the vaccine is for Ebola. I bet countries will scramble for an Ebola vaccine, if it comes. But then most diseases are not like Ebola. For more silent diseases like pneumonia, it takes concerted effort to make the decision makers recognize the burden of the disease, the value of the vaccine and the actions to take on it. For example, it took Nigeria 21 years to adopt the Haemophilus Influenza b (Hib) vaccine into our routine system. The first country to use Hib vaccine in their national program started in 1991, we started 2012.

I remember sitting in the Premier Hotel Ibadan during the 39th Annual General and Scientific Conference of the Paediatric Association of Nigeria (PANCONF) in January 2008. The halls were packed, the place was buzzing, the energy was infectious, pediatricians were milling around discussing how to save babies. I had come from Baltimore to field test a pneumonia diagnostic tool and discuss the prospect of Nigeria introducing PCV into the national immunization program.

At one of the session breaks, I cornered Dr. Abanida, then Director of Immunization at NPHCDA and asked him, “Doc, when are we going to introduce penta and PCV?” “Very soon” he replied, “We will apply for both vaccines this year”. This was an unexpected and pleasant surprise. I had predicted he would commit to only penta, but PCV as well? That was great. You see, it was no coincidence that we were coming late to the penta party when countries like Kenya had introduced the vaccine 8 year before. As a country, we had been preoccupied with battling polio, especially after the major polio vaccine rejection of 2004. In addition, our systems were weak. Indeed, before 2005, we would not have been able to apply for Gavi support for new vaccines even our immunization coverage was less than 50%, less than the required threshold. To get Gavi’s help, countries have to meet certain eligibility criteria and they have to formally apply and be approved for support.

Just as Dr. Abanida had declared, in April 2008, Nigeria tendered their first Gavi application for penta and PCV introduction support. In June 2008, the reviewers granted the application a conditional approval.

Disappointed but not deterred, in September 2008, the new vaccine application team led by Dr. Oteri, then Gavi desk officer at NPHCDA, responded to the conditions and queries from Gavi. But the second submission was rejected and the country was asked to re-apply.

Three things then happened that delayed the process for the next two and half years. First, Gavi suspended all new vaccine applications due to internal processes and funding constraints. No country could apply for new vaccine support in 2009. Second, Gavi revised their new vaccine application policy, now requiring an immunization coverage rate of at least 70% instead of 50%. Third, Nigeria’s vaccine coverage dropped below 50% to 42% according to WHO-UNICEF estimate released in June 2010. This new drop caused Dr. Dorothy Esangbedo, then the President of the Pediatric Association of Nigeria, to lament bitterly and call for stronger action to shore up routine immunization.

Under the new policy and with the lower coverage, Nigeria could not re-apply in 2010. In fact, a workshop in August 2010 convened by NPHCDA to develop the third submission was truncated by the twin news that our coverage rate had dropped and Gavi coverage requirement had increased.

When Gavi began revising their policy, there had been talk and expectation in some quarters that countries such as Nigeria, who were already in the application process before the policy change, would be “grandfathered in”. That did not pan out. To help matters, Gavi delayed the implementation of the new coverage requirement by one year, which left Nigeria with one window of opportunity to apply in May 2011.

But there was one more hurdle to scale. Coverage estimates for 2010 had to be 50% or better. The National Immunization Coverage Survey (NICS), showed coverage to be 71% for 2010, but Gavi only recognizes the WHO/UNICEF estimates, which was still 42% and would only be updated in July. Nigeria needed the updated estimates to apply in May. The update would be two months late. What to do?

The emails and phone calls started going back and forth advocating for a solution. At IVAC we pushed for different options: allow Nigeria use the NICS to apply, allow a phased introduction, so that states that meet the coverage criteria can be supported to introduce the vaccine, while effort be made to raise coverage in the other states. Dr. Mohammad Ali Pate, then Minister of State for Health, was very vocal in his advocacy to find a solution. Eventually and exceptionally, Gavi allowed Nigeria to apply for penta and PCV in May 2011. Then in July 2011, penta was approved and PCV was conditionally approved. All decisions were subject to the 2010 WHO/UNICEF DTP3 coverage estimates being >50%.

After the July 2011 conditional approval for PCV, Nigeria worked on responding to the conditions attached to the approval by strengthening the cold chain system. Then, 15 months later, in October 2012, Gavi gave the final approval for a phased roll out of PCV to begin in 2013. However, due to global supply constraints and other operational issues such as strikes in the Nigerian health sector, the first child could not be vaccinated till December 2014.

I didn’t go for the launch, but my colleagues went, and it was gratifying to see the culmination of everyone’s effort. Big thanks should go to the NPHCDA, GaviUNICEFWHOPediatric Association of NigeriaCHAI and all other groups who have pushed hard to see this happen.

1stChild_PCV_in_Nigeria

First Nigerian Child to receive the Free Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine

As I look at the grainy picture of baby Collins, who is the first child to be vaccinated, cry out in pain from the shots of the first PCV vaccination, I wish I could tell him,

“Baby, don’t cry, laugh instead, even though that injection is painful. You are getting a shot a life. Something that babies before you did not get, but thankfully those after you will receive. If we are able to immunize 87% of your fellow babies every year with this vaccine, we can save about 200,000 lives by 2020. Isn’t that something to laugh or even rejoice about? Yes indeed, it is cause for celebration. I only wish it didn’t take six long years for this to happen. Think of all the babies we could have saved in that time. Anyway, you are too young to understand all this. After all, what do you know? You are just a baby. You probably just want to suck you mother’s breast right now, forget all this noise and go to sleep. So I’ll let you be.”

 

Dr. Chizoba Wonodi (MBBS, MPH, DrPH), 
Nigeria Country Programs Lead, Johns Hopkins International Vaccine Access Centre,  
Advisor, Saving One Million Lives Initiative,  
Advisor, Gavi’s Strategic Demand Forecast for vaccines.

By Lois Privor-Dumm

It’s the time of year where many of us spend the days marking celebrations and pausing to reflect on the past year and hopes for the year to come. Today, the International Vaccine Access Center (IVAC) at the Johns Hopkins School of Public Health is joining over 500 organizations to call for universal health coverage (UHC) to be a cornerstone of the sustainable development agenda and a priority for all nations. December 12 was chosen to mark the anniversary of a landmark United Nations resolution urging all countries to provide universal access to health care without financial hardship. 

UHC logo

Universal health coverage means that all people have access to quality, effective, affordable health services. UHC is critical because 1 billion people lack access to basic health care, and another 100 million fall into poverty trying to access it, according to a World Health Organization report. Health care is a basic right, not a privilege; quality health services should be available and affordable for all.

UHC complements our mission here at IVAC, which is to accelerate global access to life-saving vaccines through development and implementation of evidence-based policies.

Without UHC, it is difficult to win the fight against disease. Although we focus on prevention through vaccines, access to treatment for diseases such as pneumonia and diarrhea (two of IVAC’s priorities), and many other diseases, are a critical part of the equation. We believe countries should prevent as much disease as possible and ensure that there is a safety net should people fall ill. When that doesn’t exist, the situation can become dire – we’ve heard too many stories of families falling into poverty because they get sick and need health care or need to take care of a sick child and as a result can no longer work. UHC is essential for making progress on access to health services – and for creating a fairer, more resilient society. Prevention and care together make good health, social, and economic sense, and all countries should adopt principles that help end the vicious cycle of poverty.

UHC is crucial as we move to a post-2015 development agenda. Great achievements have been made, but there’s more work to do. There are more diseases to avert, more lives to save. UHC focuses on a big piece of the puzzle – it’s grounded in strengthening health systems and equity as is the agenda on universal immunization. If the global community can focus on bringing UHC and the immunization agenda into reality we have the potential to make a large-scale difference. Please join me and my team in supporting a push for equitable vaccine access and Health for All. You can join the movement and learn more, here.

 

Lois Privor-Dumm, MIBS, is Director of Policy, Advocacy & Communications.

 
MS_RotaSymp2014

Mathu Santosham speaking at the Eleventh International Rotavirus Symposium in India.

This post originally appeared on the Impatient Optimists blog and is cross-posted here with permission. 

Heading to New Delhi, India recently for the Eleventh International Rotavirus Symposium, I knew that this meeting would be different. Over the past couple of years, notable advancements against rotavirus disease have occurred, including the development of a new indigenously developed vaccine in India, an enormous mass of studies with positive safety and effectiveness results, and many introductions of vaccines into national immunization programs, giving promise that we can beat this leading killer of children.

In the very first moments of my arrival, I learned that my expectations were right.

Never before have more people gathered at this symposium. An astounding 650 experts from 56 countries —more than 16 times as many people who attended our first meeting thirty years ago — came to the conference, themed, “Building on evidence: the case for rotavirus immunization.”

The sheer number and diversity of people are true testaments to the increasing awareness of rotavirus and the essential role of vaccines in reducing the suffering this disease causes.

Pediatricians, epidemiologists, researchers, policy makers, immunization program implementers, government officials and pharmaceutical representatives presented on and heard about a number of important topics. Panels ranged from the Latin American and African experience with vaccines and post-licensure impact and safety of vaccination, to immunity and new insights in strain diversity.

In addition, we discussed the critical policy challenges remaining and advocacy efforts needed to help overcome them. Advocacy among policy-makers, championed by my dear colleague and friend, the late Dr. Ciro de Quadros, along with groundbreaking vaccine development efforts and public-private partnerships are leading to greater prioritization of rotavirus; however, more must be done.

But what also stood out was the excitement of convening this biannual event in India. The new government has made laudable commitments to tackling the burden of rotavirus, and other leading childhood diseases, that will save lives and give all Indian children a chance at being healthy and productive.

Just two months ago, Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi announced that the Government of India would provide a rotavirus vaccine to all Indian children through the Universal Immunization Program. At the same time, the government has redoubled efforts to improve access to oral rehydration solution (ORS) and other key diarrhea control interventions through its Intensified Diarrhea Control Fortnight. All of these efforts are positive signs for the children of India.

At the symposium, Dr. Harsh Vardhan, India’s Union Minister of State for Health and Family Welfare, spoke about the importance of delivering vaccines to all those in need. Too many children have lost their lives, and too many families are bearing tremendous economic consequences as a result of hospitalizations due to rotavirus. In India, rotavirus is estimated to cause more than 78,000 deaths, 800,000 hospitalizations and three million outpatient visits each year.

However, even with this momentum, we must not become complacent in addressing rotavirus disease, the leading cause of severe and fatal diarrhea in children under five years of age worldwide, killing between a quarter and a half million children each year. While children everywhere are at risk of infection, the majority of deaths occur in South Asia and Sub-Saharan Africa, where children do not have good access to care.

Yet, despite the World Health Organization’s (WHO) recommendation for all countries to introduce rotavirus vaccines in their national immunization programs, only 35 percent of countries worldwide (69) have done so. The most disappointing statistic for me is that only one country in Asia — The Philippines — has introduced the vaccine nationally.

Additionally, while vaccination is the best way to protect children from rotavirus, a comprehensive approach will best protect child health and boost immunity. Vaccination should be part of a broad strategy that includes improved water, sanitation and hygiene; good nutrition; breastfeeding; ORS; and zinc supplementation.

I am hopeful that when we meet again for the next symposium, two years from now, we’ll have even more scientific and policy progress to celebrate and build on. Thanks to all of the dedicated rotavirus experts who participated and whose work is making a lasting difference in the health and well-being of children everywhere.

Thanks also to the conveners and funders: the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Christian Medical College Vellore, Indian Council of Medical Research, National Institutes of Health Fogarty International Center, PATH, ROTA Council, Sabin Vaccine Institute, Bharat Biotech, GlaxoSmithKline, Merck Pharmaceuticals, Serum Institute of India, Ltd. and WHO.

Learn more about how rotavirus vaccines can improve health and save lives at www.ROTACouncil.org.