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Institute for Global Tobacco Control

Partners and Collaborators

The Institute for Global Tobacco Control (IGTC) has received recognition for its work and achievements by being designated as: 

bloomberg philanthropies

Bloomberg Philanthropies

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world health organization

World Health Organization Collaborating Centres

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famri center of excellence

FAMRI Center of Excellence

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A Bloomberg Initiative Partner

In 2006, philanthropist and New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg launched a $125 million initiative to reduce tobacco use in low- and middle-income countries. Two years later, Mayor Bloomberg committed another $250 million to the initiative, making this the largest-ever effort to fight tobacco in low- and middle-income countries. The initiative was renewed again in 2012, with Bloomberg Philanthropies’ commitment of an additional $220 million.

IGTC at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health is a key partner in the Bloomberg Initiative to Reduce Tobacco Use, along with the World Health Organization, the CDC Foundation, Campaign for Tobacco-free Kids, Vital Strategies and the International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease.

IGTC contributes as the academic arm of the Bloomberg Initiative, conducting research, evaluation and capacity building to support the development, passage, implementation and enforcement of tobacco control policies and interventions.

Monday Campaigns

In 2012, the institute partnered with Monday Campaigns to evaluate how the "Monday concept" (using Mondays as a weekly incentive for healthy behavior) applies to tobacco cessation. Our projects with Monday Campaigns include investigating current trends in those seeking cessation and how periodic messaging increases quit success, and piloting the Quit and Stay Quit Monday messaging in Maryland state cessation classes. The Quit and Stay Quit Monday campaign encourages smokers to take advantage of all 52 Mondays in the year to quit, recommit to quitting or quit again after relapsing. 

Monday Campaigns is a non-profit public health initiative that was started in 2003 with Meatless Monday. The campaign now has programs in more than 20 countries and participation from thousands of restaurants, schools, worksites, communities and celebrities.

Robert Wood Johnson Foundation

IGTC partnered with the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation in 2015 to investigate how e-cigarettes are being regulated around the world, and to highlight the unique local-level approaches. This work created an online tool showcasing current regulations from more than 70 countries that can be used to guide future regulations on electronic nicotine delivery systems. 

WHO Collaborating Centre

In 2004, IGTC was named a World Health Organization (WHO) Collaborating Centre on Tobacco Control Surveillance and Evaluation. In consultation with PAHO, WHO and WHO Member States, the Collaborating Centre provides technical support in relation to knowledge generation, synthesis and translation, evaluation and surveillance, and capacity building. The Institute’s work is aimed at supporting multi-country research studies, developing research and evaluation tools for assessing WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC) progress and enhancing national surveillance systems.

As a Collaborating Centre, IGTC aims to facilitate the dissemination of best practices for tobacco control, strengthen national and local tobacco control research and technical capacities, and promote multi-sector, multi-disciplinary collaboration in establishing and implementing tobacco control policies consistent with the WHO FCTC.

FAMRI Center of Excellence, Translation of Evidence Core

In 2005, IGTC was designated as the Translation of Evidence Core for the FAMRI Center of Excellence at Johns Hopkins University. The FAMRI Center of Excellence encouraged collaboration among researchers working on secondhand smoke research across the Johns Hopkins University and Medical Institutions. 

The Translation of Evidence Core translated evidence on secondhand smoke (SHS) to facilitate the practical implementation of research findings generated by FAMRI investigators at Johns Hopkins University and elsewhere, and aimed to broaden the medical and public health impact of the Johns Hopkins FAMRI Center of Excellence. The center was funded by the Flight Attendant Medical Research Institute (FAMRI)