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Center for the Prevention of Youth Violence

Resources for Families

Baltimore City Healthy Start
2521 N. Charles Street
Baltimore, Maryland 21218
Phone: 410-396-7318
Fax: 410-366-2855
Email:
info@baltimorehealthystart.org
Website: http://www.baltimorehealthystart.org


*Program @ East Baltimore Collective offers home visiting for families of children 0-6 who are living within the Historic East Baltimore community.
*Program @ Greenmount-East offers home visiting for pregnant women or women with at-risk infants who are living within the Greenmount-East community. Services focus on healthy birth outcomes
*Program @ Sandtown Winchester Harlem
offers home visiting for families of children 0-6 who are living within the Sandtown Winchester/Harlem Park community.


Baltimore Families First Program
2700 N. Charles Street, Suite 200
Baltimore, MD 21218
Contact: Tonia Ferguson
Phone: 410-662-5500
Fax: 410-662-5517
Email:
tferguson@flbcinc.org
Website:
http://www.flbcinc.org

Staffed entirely by parents of children with a disability, the Baltimore Families First Program provides Information & Referral and assistance in linking with needed resources for families who are raising a child(ren) with disabilities and other special needs.


Bon Secours of Marlyand Foundation - Home Visiting Program
26 N. Fulton Avenue
Baltimore, MD
21223
Contact: Eva Austin
Phone:
410-362-3804
Email: via their website
Website: Click here
for BonSecours of Maryland Family Support Center.

Program offers home visiting services to pregnant mothers and women with high risk infants ages 0-2 residing in Southwest and West Baltimore communities.  Services focus on healthy birth outcomes.


CYFERnet
CYFERnet c/o T. Dunham
University of Minnesota Extension Center for Youth Development
490 Coffey Hall
1420 Eckles Avenue
Saint Paul MN 55108
Phone: 612-624-8181
Email:
cyf@umn.edu
Website:
http://www.cyfernet.org/

Children, Youth and Families Edcuation and Research Network (CYFERnet) provides practical research based information from leading universities. The experts database is intended to facilitate networking, collaboration and technical assistance. The site includes practical tools to evaluate community-based programs; information on how community programs can be sustained; and assessments of organizational support for work in areas of children , youth and families. The website brings together children, youth, and family resources of all the public land-grant universities in the country.


Diversity: School, Family and Community Connections
4700 Mueller Blvd.
Austin, Texas 78723
Phone: (512) 476-6861 or (800) 476-6861
TTY: (512) 391-578
Fax: (512) 476-2286
Email: info@sedl.org
Website: http://www.sedl.org/pubs/catalog/items/fam35.html

The third in a series of reports to help local school, community ,and family leaders obtain useful research-based information about key educational issues, this synthesis focuses specifically on three categories:race or ethnicity, culture (including languauge), and socioeconomic status. The report also explores barriers to involvement for minority and low-income families, strategies that have beenused to address those barriers, and recommendations that local educaitonal leaders can adapt to address their specific needs. It is based on a review of more than 64 studies.


DRU / Mondawmin Healthy Families
1200 Druid Heights Avenue 
Baltimore, MD
21217
Contact: Barbara Hughes
Phone: 410-225-3555
Website:
http://www.flbcinc.org/pi/inftod.aspx

Program implements an evidenced-based model of home visiting for children ages 0-6 in an extended Success By 6® community – Mondawmin / Druid / Reservoir Hill / Upton.


Effective Family Programs for Prevention of Delinquency
Phone: 801-581-8498
Website:
http://www.strengtheningfamilies.org/

Results of the 1999 search for "best practice" family strengthening programs by program type and age group; Prepared byThe Office of Juvenile Jusitce and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) in collaboration with the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Service's Center for Substance Abuse Prevention (CSAP). Links and two-page summaries of family-focused programs that have been proven to be effective.


Exemplary, Model, and Promising Programs to Strengthen Families
P.O. Box 42557
Washingtion, DC 20015
Phone: (800) 789-2647
TDD: (866) 889-2647 or (240) 221-4022 (International)
Fax: (240) 221-4295
Phone: (internation): (240) 221-4021

Website: http://mentalhealth.samhsa.gov

The Exemplary, Model, and Promising Programs to Strengthen Families promotes and ensures that the mental health needs of children and their families are met within the context of community-based systems of care.


"Family Strengths: Often Overlooked, But Real" (2002)
4301 Connecticut Avenue, NW
Suite 350
Washington, DC 20008
Phone: (202) 572-6000
Fax: (202) 362-8420 (third floor, Suite 350)
Fax: (202) 362-5533 (first floor, Suite 100)

Child Trends Reserch Brief that addresses the gap in understanding of strengths of families living in complex, difficult circumstances.


The Family Tree, Inc. - Home Visiting Program
2108 N. Charles Street 
Baltimore, MD
21218
Contact: Tia Blue
Phone: 410-889-2300


Program offers home visiting for pregnant women or women with at-risk infants living in the Southwest
Baltimore community. Services focus on favorable birth outcomes through the initiation and regular use
of medical, health, and social supports early in pregnancy, and by linkages to appropriate community
resources for behavioral health conditions (including maternal loss counseling).


Figure This! Mathematics Challenge for Families
Email: feedback@knownetconstruction.com
Website:
http://www.figurethis.org/

National Council of Teachers of Mathematics, in cooperation with the National Action Council for Minorities in Engineering, Widmeyer Communications, and the Learning First Alliance, launched Figure This!  The program demonstrates challenging middle school mathematics and emphasizes the importance of high-quality math education for all students.  Funding for the project was provided by the National Science Foundation and the U.S. Department of Education. Provides mathematical challenges for families provide interesting math challenges that middle-school students can do at home with their families.


Get Involved in Your Child's School
1201 16th Street, NW
Washington, DC 20036-3290
Phone: (202) 833-4000
Fax: 9202) 822-7974
Website: http://school.familyeducation.com/parents-and-teacher/school-fundraising/34542.html

National Education Association site includes guides for parents on topics such as understanding testing, helping your child with reading, math, and science,and getting involved in your child's school.


Launching Young Readers- Parents Tips
Website: http://www.pbs.org/launchingreaders/parenttips.html

Reading, and a love for reading, begins at home. The Reading Rockets team, funded by the U.S. Department of Education, put together 5 sets of tips that offer easy ways for busy parents to help kids become successful readers.


Learning Guide For Families
321N. PineStreet
Lansing, MI 48933
Phone: (571) 374-4083 or (800) 832-2464
Website: http://www.rightchoiceforkids.org/docs/FamilyGuide.pdf

The Partnership for Learning has a step-by-step guide for families looking for extra academic help during the school year, including the thousands of families eligible for tutoring scholarships under President Bush's No Child Left Behind Law. The guide includes hands-on advice to save money, identify learning disablilites, and monitor progress.


London Family Court Clinic -- Bullying: Information for Parents and Teachers
254 Pall Mall St., Suite 200
London, Ontario N6A 5P6 CANADA
Phone: 519-679-7250
Fax: 519-675-7772
Email: info@lfcc.on.ca
Website: http://www.lfcc.on.ca/bully.htm

An excerpt from A School-based Anti-Violence Program. Background information along with family and classroom prevention measures from the Center for Children and Families in the Justice System.


Mental Health Systems, Inc. – Family Recovery Program
19 E. Fayette Street, Suite 404 
Baltimore, MD
21202
Contact: Janet Neal
Phone: 410-604-0492


Program offers intensive case management and support service for parents in Baltimore City involved in
Child in Need of Assistance (CINA) proceedings. The Family Recovery Program decreases the lengths of
stay in foster care for children ages 0-5 who come before CINA Court for the first time because of their
parent’s substance abuse.


Parents Resource Institute for Drug Education
4 West Oak Street
Fremont, Michigan 49412
Phone: 231.924.1662 or 1.800.668.9277 
Fax: 231.924.5663
Email: info@prideyouthprograms.org
Website: http://www.prideyouthprograms.org

Producer of PRIDE SURVEYS Questionnaire, identifies student levels of drug use, violence, and other behaviors. Follows 2002 HR1edcuation bill report requirements on drug use and violence. Evaluates prevention strategies and effectiveness.


The Partnership for a Drug Free America
405 Lexington Avenue, Suite 1601
New York, NY 10174
Phone: 212-922-1560
Donations: 888-575-3115
Fax: 212-922-157
Press Inquiries: 212-973-3517
Website: http://www.drugfree.org/

By changing public attitudes about drugs, the Partnership seeks to "denormalize"drug use, making us less glamorous and less acceptable. Their comprehensive site includes a database of drug informaiton, tips on how to talk to kids about drug use, FAQ's (frequently asked questions), and more.


People's Community Health Center, Inc. - Home Visiting Program
2204 Maryland Avenue
Baltimore, MD 21218
Contact: Patricia Cassatt
Phone: 410-604-0492


Program offers home visiting services to pregnant women and women with at-risk infants ages 0-2 living in the Pigtown, Carroll Park, and Washington Village communities. Services focus on healthy birth outcomes.  The referral process is conducted through PCHC, and is targeted to the ob/gyn and pediatric population.


Practice What You Preach
1 Choke Cherry Road

Rockville, MD 20857
Phone: (Metal Helath Resources and Help Locator): 1800-789-2647
Phone:(Substance Abuse Resources and Help Locator): 1-800-729-6686

Children whose parents use alcohol, tobacco, or illegal durgs are at higher risk for using these substances. This article provides tips on how parents can manage their own substance use and deter their children from using also, on the SAMHSA website.


Public Eduation Network's School and Community Services Initiative
601 Thirteenth Street NW

Suite 710 South
Washington, DC 20005-3808
Phone: (202) 628-7460
Fax: (202) 628- 7460
Email:
PEN@PublicEducation.org

Addresses the challenge of meeting the non-academic needs of children ot help ensure that students are at their best, academically and socially. The initiative takes a child-centered, coordinated-services perspective that recognizes the role of schools, families, and community agencies in the lives of children.


TV Violence: How Much is There and How Does It Affect Children?
Website: http://www.aacap.org/cs/root/facts_for_families/children_and_tv_violence

Based on the cumulative evidence of studies conducted over several decades, the scientific and public health communites overwhelmingly conclude that viewing vilence poses a risk to children, but critics of the research challenge this conclusion. Decide for yourself with the help of this TV Violence Fact Sheet from the Kaiser Family Fund.


WebGuide For Parents
Website: http://www.cfw.tufts.edu/

A directory produced by Tufts University that evaluates, describes and provides links to hundreds of site containing child development research and practical advice. The WebGuide selects sites that have the highest quality child development research and that are parent-friendly. Topics are based on parent recommendations and cover all ages, from early child development through adolescence.


What Parents and Teachers Really Mean By Parental Involvement
New York Office
Public Agenda
6 East 39th Street, 9th Floor
New York, NY 10016
Phone: 212-686-6610
Fax: 212-889-3461

Washington Office
Andrew Yarrow
Vice President and Director of Washington Office
1100 New York Avenue NW, Suite 1090 East
Washington, DC 20005
Phone: 202-292-1020
Fax: 202-775-8885

Public Agenda Online looks at the ways parents and teachers agree--and disagree--about what parents should be doing in their kids' schools.


YouthARTS Toolkit for At-Risk Youth
1000 Vermont Avenue, NW
Washington, DC 20005
Phone: 202-371-2830
Email: webmaster@artsusa.org
Website: http://www.artsusa.org/youtharts/

The YouthARTS Web site is designed to give art agencies, juvenile justice agencies, social service organizations, and other community-based organizations detailed information about how to plan, run, provide training, and evaluate arts programs for at-risk youth.


Programs for School-Aged Youth

Building Blocks For Youth
Youth Law Center
1010 Vermont Avenue, N.W., Suite 310
Washington, DC 20005
Phone: 202 637-0377
Fax: 202 379-1600
Email: info.bby@erols.com
Website: http://www.buildingblocksforyouth.org/


An alliance of children and youth advocates, researchers, law enforcement professionals and community organizers that seeks to reduce over-representation and disparate treatment of youth of color in the juvenile justice system and promote fair, rational and effective juvenile justice policies. The alliance is engaged in: conducting new research; analyzing decision making in the system; advocating for minority youth; building constituencies for change; developing communication strategies.


Programs for Youth with Special and Intensive Needs

Building Blocks For Youth
Youth Law Center
1010 Vermont Avenue, N.W., Suite 310
Washington, DC 20005
Phone: 202 637-0377
Fax: 202 379-1600
Email: info.bby@erols.com
Website: http://www.buildingblocksforyouth.org/


An alliance of children and youthadvocates, researchers, law enforcement professionals and community organizers that seeks to reduce over-representation and disparate treatment of youth of color in the juvenile justice system and promote fair, rational and effective juvenile justice policies. The alliance is engaged in: conducting new research; analyzing decision making in the system; advocating for minority youth; building constituencies for change; developing communication strategies.